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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/13/18 in all areas

  1. 43 points
    Here are my two kitsune figures, painted at last! These two are available in Dark Heaven Legends as 03801 Kogo (him) and 03802 Dijoro (her). In Bones, they are 77473 and 77474. I painted the metal versions. Pathfinder has rules for kitsune and tengu characters, and they have been legal in Pathfinder Society for a couple of years, so I wanted Reaper to have miniatures available to those players. I sculpted these two in late 2015 (wow, that long ago?!). They were in the "Eastern Legends" stretch-goal of the Bones 3 Kickstarter, along with my 3 tengu figures and Tre Manor's oni. You can search for the keyword "tengu" to find my painted examples here in the Show-Off forum. And here is a link to my Show-Off thread of my conversion of an elf to a kitsune. I had chosen these general colors (green/teal for him, and pink/purple for her) at least a year ago, but not the details. I've spent 20+ hours on each of the two, including prep, priming, image-searches, painting, a few rounds of photos and touchups, and now this post. I had intended to give them quick-but-clean paint jobs (not more than 10 hours each), but the hours added up with the detailed patterns and freehand, the custom "Japanese garden" bases (his Zen garden of stones and raked gravel, and her stone and lantern), and repainting both figures' bladed weapons with simpler smooth gradients (over a very busy small-brushstroke effect the first time). I sculpted their clothes relatively simply, so you can paint them with smooth blends or give them intricate freehand patterns. I did an online image-search for "Japanese fabric patterns" and used a few that I liked most. The color and pattern of his shirt are inspired by a piece of celadon pottery with a network of fine cracks in its glaze. I expected to paint his sake bottle and cup in a lighter color (white or celadon green), but the rusty red worked better in the composition. I did an image-search for "red glazed sake cups" to assure myself of a real-world precedent. A few more notes and details: What's with her pose? I intended her to be drawing a hidden knife from her bodice, though I think I sculpted it a little too well-hidden. Her expression is devious on the right side but fake-afraid on the left. Nevermind the naginata in plain sight, it's the hidden knife that her opponent should fear!... I asked ReaperRon (art director) whether a female kitsune should have humanlike hair to be more obviously feminine, and sketched a few options. He preferred this one with the long flowing hair. I painted it with a transition from orange to dark brown so there wouldn't be an obvious hairline. I like the accidental color on his haramaki ("belly-warmer" armor) -- I couldn't decide whether to paint it green, blue, purple, or brown, and the multiple layers of paint combined in an interesting way. That smirk! I need to call them done and move on to other projects. Enjoy! Derek
  2. 38 points
    I'm sorry that I forgot the name of this mini. Here is a miniature that I finished quite a while ago, but I never got around to posting him. He's from Studio McVey's stunning LE resin line (shame we haven't seen anything new from it for a while). I painted him up for an RPG, and I think he came out rather nicely. For most of my minis, I prefer to use a black undercoat, but I decided to try white on him instead, to see how I liked it. I discovered that I didn't like it at all. While the painting over the white isn't significantly different from painting over black, I found that it was more difficult to tell if my composition was working as I went- the bright white of the unfinished areas made it very hard to tell. Conversely, with a black undercoat, I can usually tell whether I've highlighted an area light enough and if my overall composition is working out. The advantage that you get from a white undercoat is that you can more easily see the detail on the mini before you paint it, but that's not something I struggle with. While some people claim that your colors will turn out brighter if you're painting over white or black (yes, I've heard this claimed about both) I find that if you're doing enough layers to get a solid base coat, there's no way to tell if you used white or black to start from.
  3. 37 points
    Ok Reaper Buddies! Since I can't go outside on account of Monster Hurricane and I still (squee!) have power, I'm painting a bust. I thought it might be fun to try to do another "how to" hopefully to give some insight into busts and how I approach them. I may ramble a bit like usual! So, my standard bust approach to to pick something I want to work on and pick a photo to use as a guide. This bust is Athena from FeR miniatures. I can't seem to find a good unpainted example and since I'd already basecoated mine, here is the box art from Pepa: Please note- Pepa is truly awesome and the painted example above is NOT mine! As you can see, it's the Greek Goddess Athena complete with her trusty owl. I'm tired of light skin though, and I need to practice my darker skintones. I'm using this bust to do that. The bust comes in several pieces: main torso, owl, owl wing and front arm. I drill all my holes for pins and deal with my mold lines, attach her to a cork and prime. Then I find more mold lines and tackle those. I wait on assembly until most of the painting is done to make it easier. Next I pick colors I think I might use and try to remember them. If I'm smart I write them down somewhere. I highly recommend that! Hmmn. This is one where the swatches don't really reflect reality. Walnut brown is dark, and mahogany brown is a nice deep red-brown but much lighter than walnut. At any rate, I'm also using Anne's fancy red shade yellow which is like a bright golden yellow for the cloth and some ochers. I'll try to list those later when I get into the cloth. But those are the skin tones I want to use. Initially I mixed a fun shade for my basecoat thinking I wanted to go more greenish in my shadows, but I changed my mind. For completeness sake, the basecoat below is a mix of: Ends up fairly gray due to the red and green together, which is why I decided to just go warmer. I think I'd fight too much working in the green. I may just glaze it in later in certain areas, but I'll get to that. Ok, next I want to pick a light direction. This is super important on larger minis, because they add interest. It allows me to go deeper with some shadows and higher with certain highlights. This makes the viewer's eye bounce around. This is a good thing. We want to keep the viewer interested in the mini, so all out little tricks are designed to do just that! Here I've held the mini up to a bright light source and taken the pictures. I could choose to use this as a reference as I go, to make sure I make the light look natural as it flows over the form. This brings up a good point. See how certain parts of the mini are brighter? Like the SCM muscle in the neck and the collarbones? They stick out when the neck is flexed in one direction and the collarbones have very thin skin over them. They catch light. Like the nose and the cheekbones, the area above the top lip and the chin... all of these either have thinner skin or stick out farther, catching most light sources. Using the idea of "volumes" in the face helps paint it more naturally. Knowing where things go and how they fit together helps paint the larger faces. Here's an example courtesy of google: See how they've broken the surface up into geometric shapes? We can do that with painting just like drawing. I decided to play with my olive skin and disliked it immediately. At this point I was playing around, and didn't have a model to follow. I wasn't sure what skintone I wanted. But as long as I use thin layers, I can always paint over it. I decided after this to go back to google like a good Erin and pick someone to copy. Isn't she gorgeous? Naema Hossain from Bangladesh. Yay! Inspiration always helps me paint, and it's a lot easier to follow a map than to make it up as I go along. The light source in this photo is more or less what I want, and it's a high resolution photo, which means I can zoom way in to get the eyes the way I want. Now I've worked in a bunch of the mahogany brown in glazes over the basecoat and added in highlights where I see them on the photo. See how that starts to define the face more. I've also decided on painting a yellow patterned sari and I'll go with black hair. Note- I am NOT using a pure black here, just the walnut brown as my off black. puttering along, pushing and pulling. The blends don't have to be smooth and I'm really only worried about making the anatomy make sense at this point. All minis enter this weird ugly stage almost up until the point where they're finished. This is normal. It doesn't mean you're doing something wrong. I worked in some shadows and cleaned up my lines and decided her eyes were just too blank. I can only have dead eye on a mini for so long. I still have to straighten up her gaze and clean the eyes, but at least they're not staring at me anymore. I also love how gaze helps develop personality in miniatures. It really changes then feel of the piece. Not sure what I changed, but I tried to make myself stop and take photos every now and then. It's hard because I get in a groove and want to paint while I have energy and direction. When I stop I lose focus. Sigh. Ok I played with the blending and the lips for sure. Probably a bunch of layers I don't remember. The key is layering and keep referencing the photo to make certain I'm following my map. I decided to take a break from skin and work on the hair. Hair is fun! See where I've taken the walnut brown and mixed it with the olive skin? I did a stark layer to show where I'd put the highlights. When anything bends in relation to light, you'll get a highlight on the bend- more or less. This is a good rule of thumb to tackle hair. Notice, I'm not painting individual strands, but blocking out my highlights? Same on the crown of the head. I like this photo- it shows how I've blocked in a lot of volumes, but haven't bothered with the blending yet. This will keep me from getting lost later. Then I worked in some linen white. Black hair is, well, dark, but it still has high highlights. Not all of them are the same. Again- I go back to my light source. Parts that sitck out further or are close to the light get higher highlights. This is probably another one of those sneaky tricks I should mention. Varying the intensity of both shadows and highlights add interest and make the mini more natural. Sometimes when we harp on contrast, we don't mean taking everything up to white and down to black. We mean contrasting the depth of our shadows and highlights- making some pop more than others. This is a gold-level trick I think. And I started to work on the highlights on the braid. As long as most of the hair stays walnut brown, it will look black. It just has some very narrow highlights. That's all black is- being very careful with how much highlighting I do. Ok, more when I'm done with my ice cream break! Or maybe after I clean out my Diablo stash... maybe tomorrow... fingers crossed for power! Let me know if you have questions or if I can explain something better or differently to make more sense.
  4. 36 points
    One of my favorite things about my job is meeting new dogs. You can tell they're happy and excited if they beat you with their adorable tails. I love dogs! So... yeah.... have been feeling unwell lately... in a "female" way... but for longer than usual.... Just confirmed today.... I'm pregnant
  5. 35 points
    Fun Dark Sword mage that I finished recently. I painted her fairly quickly so I did not do a WIP thread. I am really happy with how her skin turned out, I think skin is finally clicking with me. Also tried NMM gold for the first time and actually really enjoyed it. Defintely will do more NMM in the future as it made painting the fiddly bits easier. TMM was a pain when I previously painted Dark Sword Miniatures with similar ornaments, it’s good for large areas not so much for tiny ones. One last thing is a slight conversion, she was sculpted with a bottle in her hand that I made into a mushroom to tie her to the base more.
  6. 31 points
    Here are the pictures of the Grudge all finished. While there were times that I hated how things looked, in the end I am extremely happy with how he turned out. WIP: http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/81903-the-grudge-30014/
  7. 29 points
  8. 28 points
  9. 27 points
    A rotting stench catches you nose. You see a creature slowly moving in your direction waving a dagger. At first, it looks like a beggar wearing rags. He utters a low moan and you realize as it's coming out of the shadows that he's missing part of its scalp and has a gaping hole in its abdomen through which you see his ribs and his petrified organs. Turning to the cleric, you scream with horror. Zombie! Here's 02102, Plague Zombie, Dark Heaven Legends sculpted by Bob Ridolfi. It's the second time i paint this model, here's the link to 02043: Undead Rising, 02102: Plague Zombie & 02157: Undead Awakening I painted 10 years ago.
  10. 27 points
    Unfortunate Cadwalon, plague infected, denizen of the sewers. Like a rat able to disappear under the rubble, without a trace. Unfortunate Cadwalon, poison merchant, burglar and opportunistic trickster. Those who know him are aware of his impulsivity and fear enchanted blade. Those who disregard him will pay bitterly for their negligence. Here's 02044, Cadwalon in all its magnificence , Dark Heaven Legends sculpted by Sandra Garrity.
  11. 26 points
    You've been groping underground for a while when you catch the sound of beating bat wings down the cavern ahead. A few steps more and the oozing walls open on a large cave. Small rusty-red creatures are flying in circle between stalactites, four pincer-like legs and a proboscis dangling under their hairy body. Abruptly, you notice a change in their behavior. They all hover in place and their yellowish eyes pierces in your direction. Before you have time to do anything, you are swarm by these bloodthirsty Stirges. Here are the 02691, Striges Dark Heaven Legends sculpted by Bob Olley.
  12. 26 points
    Presenting Farris, a former knight turned member of the Blacksmiths Guild, from the game Guild Ball. Rather pleased with this in the end, although I need more experience working on PVC minis, I missed so many mold-lines while prepping this one! As always, any comments or criticisms are warmly received.
  13. 26 points
    Can’t remember the mold, sorry...added some GW heads I had laying around. Needed an executioner for a game...seemed fitting
  14. 26 points
    I painted this one up for, again, my son, who wanted a custom mini to represent himself in whatever board game we were playing at the time. I think it captures the essence of his spirit. He's Hasslefree's HFH037: Albert Super tiny, super fast mini! -K
  15. 23 points
    Husband is sick. I am starting to feel sick too. I think he infected me i spent today with a box of tissues, green stuff, and my dragon. I am happy with my progress
  16. 23 points
    Figured I'd drop a few more unprofessional pics of the few things I've done in the last year. I painted this wizard for my son to use in a potential game of Frosthaven that we still haven't been able to play. At any rate, I like how he turned out and my son likes his owl. I really need to get my light tent set up as the simple desk light doesn't do anything for these mins.... LOL! -K
  17. 22 points
    Arkham's Finest represented by Murch's Pulp 16th Street Precinct (the set whence the hobo came), one of his Dangerous Dames, and one of his Journalists (the Kolchak-looking fellow with the jaunty tie.) "All right, men--and ladies too--keep a sharp eye out for that son o' Hell deFazio! Detective Flanagan has a tip he's over on the East Side tonight. Roz, if'n you see him, whistle, and deck him if you get the chance. O'Malley, keep your gun handy. Jaysus mary! Watch where ye're pointing that thing, O'Hanlon!" Carmine deFazio, Mob Hitman, represents their opposite number. "Nyeh! Eat lead, coppers! You'll never take me alive, see?"
  18. 22 points
    This one is from Super Dungeon Explore and was a welcome challenge to try to paint a more Toon-ish style. I think Angry Bear came out pretty good all things considered. I do recall him taking a long time to paint by brush... Rawr! -K
  19. 21 points
    I have a resin master of the Bones 4 anklyosaurus so I will be trying to do as a good a paint job as I can manage on him
  20. 21 points
    I have mad my decisions as well. First, some Bones that my kids selected out of the box. Then my selections started out with some bits. Some fairies and a Bones spider (I plan on hiding the fairies in my Mossbeard one I get him and get it painted) Some decals Then last was a gift from @buglips*the*goblin along with an awesome note. Got my donations packed in and I should have this in the mail to @Morihalda on Monday
  21. 21 points
    Salmon. Nothing fishy about that name, right? Also: Red is now a limited edition mini mold. Takes a while to cast but not as long as Bones 4
  22. 20 points
    Ima baby factory Where the heck do I get that?! I NEED one!!
  23. 19 points
    Howdy, Stripped and re-painted... Strange Magic, Kev!
  24. 19 points
  25. 19 points
    ??? This thread is like a squirrel just running all over the place
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