Rodnik

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About Rodnik

  • Rank
    Godlike
  • Birthday 12/06/66

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    http://www.renderedharmless.com
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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    'Lanta, Gawgia
  • Interests
    Hangin' with my homies, spending time with the family, and I dabble with a bit of paint.
  1. I am so very sorry. I believe there's a very special place set aside in heaven for babies...and a special place for the people that suffer the loss of one.
  2. We're thinking about going. If we do, it'll be last minute and solely for the painting competition.
  3. How about using Benford's Law of Controversy to establish the merits of the debate, as opposed to simply trying to end it..8)
  4. My job has kept me out of the painting circle for a couple of years how, but I'm slowly getting my time back. My intention is to hit Texas the very next opportunity. I don't have a contest idea, but I am going to bring a few minis for the judges, then I'm going to see how many people can tolerate me long enough to share a pitcher or three.
  5. I've always felt the true value of conventions and contests are to meet people with similar interests and ideals. Granted, I don't tend to be very successful at this particular philosophy, but then I have a personality that's difficult for some to tolerate. Regardless, the contests and conventions I remember are not the ones where I've won a trophy, certificate, or a little swag. The one's I remember are where I met someone new and interesting, bought a beer for someone I admire, had a great conversation with someone I find intriguing, or simply got to sling a little paint with folks I see once per year. The miniatures I enter in contests are nothing more than conversation pieces to me---that little "what's-it" that may provide the initial little spark for a friendship (as well as an excuse to attend the convention in the first place). I certainly put time and effort into my paint, but it's because I absolutely love the process--not because I'm seeking the big "W". Hell, if I win something, it's nothing more than a little pat on the back affirming that I've wasted tons of money and time on pewter. Not to take away from the hours it takes to achieve some degree of mastery at this hobby, as I've spent my time in the chair, too---but it would be nice if more of us would be a little more light-hearted about painting our pewter and just try to enjoy the experiences this hobby brings. Cheers, Kev
  6. I'm right there with you. That's the same reason I refuse to live in a house or eat food.
  7. I'll come out of lurker mode to say I'm very proud you won. It's obviously an inspired and creative piece. Cheers! Kev
  8. Alrighty..I'm a bit bored and hanging at the house tonight, so I'll bite. And, no, I'm not proofreading my own post in the hopes of protecting myself from the grammar/spelling police. You'll all just have to deal with my mistakes. I guess the first thing I'll call out is the very slight bit of irony is this statement.. The following is all stated in good spirits, but it does stem from years of being repeatedly being poked at for my southern accent and colloquialisms. Under any circumstance, I'm a southerner. A southerner with a pretty strong accent. However, I've been told by a number of folks practicin' pedagogy that I have a fairly decent mastery of the English language. I've been labeled as "unlearned" a number of times because of my speech, particularly by "non-southerners" that don't know me. Anyone that does know me will generally say that I'm a pretty good distance, on the other end of the scale, from "unlearned". Those same people may also say I'm an intolerable a**, but that's not what we're discussing here. To the point (and I'll dramatize a bit). Like the majority of native North Georgians, my heritage is Gaelic. I'm a hillbilly...a redneck. My forefathers were Ulster-Irish. Some may use the incorrect moniker of Scots-Irish, but it's all one in the same. The Queen's English was not our first language. When we landed in the Colonies, we were pushed into Appalachia, where we had to fight the natives on one side and England on the other, constantly, just to have a safe place to sleep. And this was after the centuries of oppression from England that sent us here to begin with. Any southern hillbilly's family would have a pretty good chance at being from this Gaelic heritage. As a result of "my people" being somewhat isolated, until relatively recently, we picked up (and still use) a few little oddities from the incorporation of the Gaelic lnaguages into English. With all that said, I really enjoyed some of the posts about language morphing, over time, into something almost unrecognizable from its original roots. So, I thought I'd share some oddities from the Gaelic/Hillbilly influence that some folks may find interesting. I'm sure some of you have heard a southerner say he "was fixin' to do something". The word make, do, and a-going are all synonyms of fix in Gaelic--namely the phrase "ag dul". So, "I'm a fixin' to lay down", is a phrase rooted deeply in this heritage. Also, there's no good word for "only" in Gaelic. So, you'll often hear a southerner say "There ain't but one"....as opposed to "There is only one." When you hear a southerner say "Who with?", instead of the proper "With whom?"--again, Gaelic influence. You'll hear many southerners use the word "what" instead of "that". "He's the guy that went to town" becomes "He's the guy what went to town" when a Gaelic influence is felt. And a few words that most everyone uses that came from these same influences---please excuse my spelling, as most of this is from memory--- uisce beatha---a Gaelic term meaning "breath of life". Well..that's "whiskey". Yep. The hillbillies did, and do, distill their own liquor--a skill brought from the "motherland". smithereens--smidirini is a Gaelic word meaning "small pieces". slob--slaba, in Gaelic, is "mud". slew--sluagh is a "crowd". shanty--sean tigh means an "old house". galore--go leor is "enough". even the word "session".... Anyway, I just thought I'd take a moment to share. And please understand, when I say "Gaelic", I use that in a *very* general sense. Just understand it to mean one of the few Gaelic languages (Irish, Scottish, etc). And for the purposes of this post could even mean Celtic. Because of the melting pot that is my accent, I just chose to leave out all the historically accurate minutia in favor of simply conveying the spirit of the post somewhat succinctly. Cheers, Kev
  9. Not to mention, *real* ninjas totally flip-out and cut people's heads off... http://www.realultimatepower.net/index4.htm
  10. "This is a stick-up, give me all your Cheetos and Mountain Dew!!"
  11. For what it's worth---I've never been really "qualified" for any job/promotion I've ever taken. However, I've used tenacity (and a somewhat reasonable level of intelligence) to "qualify" myself as soon as humanly possible. Point is, don't be afraid to take the risk simply because you don't know the subject matter as well as you think you should---just jump in and start swimmin'.
  12. I would hire an attorney that specializes in these matters.
  13. Oh..no...I'm not going to participate...I'm simply doing my part to make everyone else's life miserable.. Besides, if it were down to you and I in a competition---I'd just end up embarrassed.
  14. Anne, What about this one... In the spirit of speed paint, have a set number of paint bottles each painter can use.... And from the set of Reaper Master, each competitor gets to pick the other's paints... You know..10 bottle limit, and you're opponent chooses which bottles you can use.
  15. I'm with Anne here...this one is definitely salvageable...don't strip it. If you can't get the paint kit she suggested, I'd suggest leaving your shades/midtones the same and work your highlights up *really* hot. They don't have to be perfect for your first few attempts, but I've found the biggest challenge for most folks is understanding the amount of "whites" involved in NMM. There seems to be some aversion to taking highlights up really high--and effective NMM requires 'em. Just pick where you'd think light would hit---and work those areas from the midtone to a very concentrated white edge line. This doesn't make for perfect NMM, but it certainly seems to help folks get past the mental block that most seem to have. Once you get this worked---just keep going back and forth with the colors until it's smooth, smooth, smooth. Lather, rinse, repeat (and add a few other technical nuances) for each subsequent miniature until it all 'comes together'.