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Heisler

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Everything posted by Heisler

  1. Heisler

    Mouse Paints for Reapercon (Kind of)

    And actually taking a black & White picture or converting to one is a great way to check your contrasts and see if things are getting muddy.
  2. Heisler

    Mouse Paints for Reapercon (Kind of)

    But if you go all the way to white, again not a bad thing, those highlights need to be very small and very precise. Using a glaze to help re-establish the midtone is always a useful tool. You can even glaze with your shadow color which will help blend the transitional layers together. You are at the might were precision is the key. Again you need higher contrast, in your shadow areas, pick the deepest portion and darken it up more, especially if you take your highlights to white.
  3. Heisler

    Mouse Paints for Reapercon (Kind of)

    My 2 cents for what its worth. These are solid efforts but you need to heighten the contrasts a lot more to make the miniatures pop. More definition between the different types of materials; leather, cloth, armor etc will help keep everything blending together so much. There is a lot of detail in the straps on the gnome that are just getting lost. Deepen your shadows more, more than you are comfortable doing, the same is true with the hair on both pieces. You really need more shadows and probably still need to bring the highlights up on everything.
  4. Effective May 2015 the CMPA is moving to the 3rd Saturday of each month. We will be meeting at Total Escape Games in Broomfield CO. The address is: 6831 120th Ave, Broomfield, CO 80020 3rd Saturday Dates: 5/16, 6/20, 7/18, 8/15, 9/19, 10/17, 11/21, 12/19 and 1/16/2016 There is an event calendar on our website: http://cominipainters.com/ and on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ColoradoMiniaturePaintersAlliance
  5. I have added the HMGS awards for Best Historical Single Figure and Best Historical Machines of War. At this point I do not know what types of prizes are being offered. I will elaborate on the details if/when I receive them.
  6. Okay, we do have some manufacturer awards for the Reaper Con 2018 Painting Competition. This is what I know so far: Dark Sword: Dark Sword Diorama Category: $150 in Dark Sword Online Store Credit + $100 Cash + Trophy for best overall Dark Sword Diorama $100 in Dark Sword Online Store Credit + Ribbon for 2nd place Dark Sword Diorama Dark Sword Single Miniature Category: $150 in Dark Sword Online Store Credit + $100 Cash + Trophy for best overall Dark Sword Single Miniature $100 in Dark Sword Online Store Credit + Ribbon for 2nd place Dark Sword Single Miniature Dark Sword Critter Kingdoms Anthropomorphic Animals Open Category: Can be either a single miniature or a diorama - simply carving out a separate category for our Critter Kingdoms minis. $150 in Dark Sword Online Store Credit + $100 Cash + Trophy for best overall Dark Sword Critter Kingdoms $100 in Dark Sword Online Store Credit + Ribbon for 2nd place Dark Sword Critter Kingdoms Dark Sword Young Painter Category (Age 13 and under): Can be either a single miniature or a diorama - simply carving out a separate category for our young painters. $100 in Dark Sword Online Store Credit + Ribbon for best overall Dark Sword Young Painter $50 in Dark Sword Online Store Credit + Ribbon for 2nd place Dark Sword Young Painter The Dark Sword Miniatures Manufacturer Awards are open to all painters. To be eligible for the prize support listed, the entries must be new entries, never before posted online or entered into any other painting competitions. In addition, no entries can be commissions from Dark Sword Miniatures for painted studio models. This means Dark Sword studio painters can enter if they so desire, but their entries must be brand new creations not commissioned from Dark Sword and must also adhere to the eligibility requirements above. Kabuki - 300 Euro Prize for the best Kabuki Miniature, regardless of category, in the painting competition. We are looking for a way to involve Rodolfo in the judging this year. Bombshell Miniatures Bombshell Miniatures presents the 2018 Golden Maelee Awards. This is a Sponsored Award section of the annual Reaper Master Series Open Painting Contest. Entries will be awarded 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place Maelee trophies. Entries will need to feature at least one or more Bombshell Miniatures as the prominent subject. This can be anything from Babes, Sidekicks, Kritterkins, to robots, or busts. Each entry will be judged on its own merit of painting execution, presentation, and skill. Entries from artists who have been professionally commissioned by Bombshell Miniatures are ineligible. Scale 75 Best Scale 75 75MM or Bust $50.00 Coupon to our web store. Best Smog Rider (CHIBI) $50.00 Coupon to our web store. Bet Scale 75 piece overall piece by a junior Smog Rider Starter set. Talon Games Best Individual CAV Model: Any single-model figure. Best CAV "Squad": This category allows for multiple models (minimum four models) as part of a cohesive squad. Best CAV Diorama: This category covers models with a scenic base where the entry is telling a story to the viewer and may include multiple models. Each category winner will receive a $100 Talon Games Gift Certificate and a Trophy. HMGS HMGS is proud to announce that the organization is sponsoring awards for Best Historical Single Figure and Best Historical Machines of War in the Reaper Con 2018 Master Series Painting competition. That's all I know about it, I have no idea what prizes will be offered for this. This first post in the thread will be updated with other manufacturers as we receive them.
  7. Heisler

    Reapercon 2018 Enthusiasm and Chatter

    If it helps the hotel opened in either late December or January so there shouldn’t be a problem but better safe than sorry.
  8. Heisler

    Reaper League Fantasy Football 2018

    I suppose we could always drop to an eight team league if we really needed to.
  9. ReaperCon is at the end of October this year, which means its only 5 months away, literally tomorrow by my ever slowing painting speed. One of my problems with painting competitions, in general, is that I really prefer the diorama category which means that there is a lot more work to be done on each entry. I'm contemplating just two entries this year, there is just so much going on right now Last year my dioramas did quite well with the "Steady Lads" receiving a gold medal and "Shopping II" receiving the Best Hasslefree Miniatures Entry award. Steady Lads - Gold Medal (my first at ReaperCon, it was also in the top five for a Sophie Trophy) There are a couple of easter eggs on this one that very few people picked up on. There is a rat coming out of rat hole in the building's side behind one of the soldiers and a resident in the far right hand window. Shopping II - Best Hasslefree Miniature Entry My only regret on this one is not going a lot heavier with the graffiti. Quite frankly I wasn't sure I could pull it off so I kept it small, and then managed to hide most of it behind the dumpster. I really enjoy all the dioramas that show up at ReaperCon and other conventions. The diorama category was well represented at ReaperCon last year with about 40 entries most of which were excellent. However, there is always room for improvement! I usually try to make sure that my team gets to judge the diorama category at ReaperCon and I thought I would share what we are looking for in a diorama or vignette. These are my opinions in the end if you are happy with what you created that's what is really important What is the difference between a diorama and a vignette? I have never really found a good definition but it seems that most vignettes are 3 or fewer figures on a smaller base, dioramas are anything larger than that. That seems pretty straightforward enough and within most competitions they are going to fall into the same category anyway. I feel like the vignette is harder to pull off effectively there are fewer elements so you need to be more precise with your story. First; the Story. Seriously this really is the key to a successfully entry. You must clearly tell your story with just the miniatures and the scene you set them in. If you have to stand there and explain it to the people that are viewing it then you have failed. Simple stories are the best but a complex story or action can also be told. There is a tendency here to add as many miniatures as possible to tell our story and if there are to many miniatures the story can be lost. Unfortunately there is no formula for this you have to make that decision on your own. Second; the Setting. There are two main pieces to setting; time and place. Both "Steady Lads" and "Shopping II" are urban settings and that defines the materials that I can use. Each piece has a distinct time stamp to it. By picking a time you eliminate elements that might contradict your story. For instance an electric lamp in "Steady Lads" would be inappropriate as the setting is in England about the time of Jack the Ripper when gas street lamps (and even candle powered) lamps were common. "Shopping II" is set in the future although only the minis themselves really give full credence to a futuristic setting. The only other clue is that none of the graffiti or signs are in English. Fortunately the soldiers are obviously in a period later than our own. So now you have a time and a place, how are you going to fill it? Third; Composition. This is the make or break point for the creation of a diorama. The composition of your piece needs to draw your viewer in and move their eye from element to element to the focal point without letting the viewer accidentally leave the scene. The focal point will help establish your composition and draw all your elements together and resist putting it in the center! Looking at "Shopping II" we find that the tall red boots are the focal point of the piece. All the site lines within the piece draw the viewer into the scene and with the walls serving as large, simple view blocks, the viewer is kept within the scene. The focal point in "Steady Lads" is not as obvious. Here it is the point where the two groups are going to come into conflict so its a vague point roughly at the corner of the building where the action is going to take place. It also lacks the obvious view blocks of "Shopping II". In this case the gas lamp at the corner and the narrow space between it and the building help keep the viewer in the scene while on the left side the Sergeant is motioning "Off Set" characters into the scene which draws the viewer's eye back to the center of the piece. These are the elements that the judges, at least at ReaperCon, are looking for in a diorama. How well you pull these three things off will determine what kind of award you are going to receive at the awards ceremony. You may have heard or read about painting for the judges now you know what I consider to be important! So here are few tips that I try to follow when I'm working on my dioramas and vignettes: 1) Story first! I don't start pulling anything together till I feel like I have a story I want to tell. Sometimes that's triggered by a picture, a photograph, a poster, or even a mini that I know I want to do more with than just let it stand around on a base by itself. 2) Mock up the space! Get some cardboard, legos, or blocks of wood and outline the space. defining the space now will help you keep things in control when you start to add the other elements, Some of the first mockups for "Steady Lads". Note how much it changed from these mockups to the final version For "Shopping II" I started by defining the space with the walls. Then added additional elements till I was happy with the space. I knew I was going to have some dead space in this diorama so I added elements like the dumpster and the piping to help fill those voids. The back wall was to blank so I tried my hand at some freehand graffiti. I hid a chunk of this behind the dumpster because I felt like it was dominating the scene to much. Hiding it helped tone it down into a smaller supporting element. 3) How many minis? Usually the story tells me this. Once I have a story I start to pull minis together that I want to use, often this is a lot more than I need but I'm not sure what I want quite yet. I start adding all the minis to the mockup, its probably pretty crowded at this point. I then start removing minis one at a time. I keep doing this till the story becomes unclear, then I add back that key mini and I know I have all the minis I need to effectively tell the story. That doesn't mean there isn't a place for large dioramas with lots (even hundreds) of miniatures and lots of tiny scenes that add to the whole but time is precious and for a competition I would recommend keeping things as simple as possible. 4) Avoid lines that are parallel to the edges of the diorama/vignette base. Even a small angle will help make your edge look less like an edge. "Steady Lads" is one of the only times I have broken this particular "rule". I felt that by adding in the angles I would actually distract the viewer from the scene and actually lead them right out of it. Here you can see how I angled the walls so they weren't parallel to the base. This helps keep the composition flowing from one point to the next and adds a bit of interest. 5) While a diorama/vignette still needs to be well painted, painting is somewhat secondary to the story. One of the things to remember is that, most of the time, we want the emphasis to be on the miniatures. Background elements should not vie for the viewers attention. Keep colors for secondary elements somewhat muted so that the minis dominate the scene. Here we can see how the background elements actually fade into the background and leave the minis as the main elements. There you have it, my own personal views on building a successful diorama. There are a number of books that I would recommend as well. I own all of these and they are quite well thumbed through. I have even had to replace my Shep Paine book once. How to Build Dioramas; Aircraft, Armor, Ship & Figure Models. Shepherd Paine, Kalmbach Publishing Building Dioramas, Chris Mrosko, Kalmbach Publishing The Art of the Diorama, Ray Anderson, Kalmbach Publshing (This one might be out of print) Scenery & Dioramas, Robert Schleicher, Chilton Hobby Series FAQ; for Constructing and Painting Dioramas, Mario Milla & Rafael Milla, Andrea Press If you have other good books on dioramas feel free to mention them.
  10. You know me from such forum posts as: http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/60626-so-you-are-thinking-of-entering-the-painting-competition-at-reapercon/ http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/71583-msp-open-judging-what-you-were-afraid-to-ask/ and http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/68535-some-thoughts-on-dioramas/ As the convention approaches like a steamroller, the eyes glaze over and the hands begin to shake, there is no way you can possibly finish all the entries you have planned for the competition. You come to the immediate conclusion that you cannot possibly finish any of your entries in time. You have entered the competition version of painter’s block! I see posts in the forums every year about people not being able to finish their entries for one reason or another. But I tell you there are options! 1) Reduce the number entries you are working on. Seriously look at the entries you are working on and immediately reduce the number by half. That will make things look more doable. Here are a few suggestions to help you make those decisions. a. As much as you love that diorama idea, if the base isn’t ready then it’s the first thing you drop. Dioramas are serious time sinks. b. If the conversion work isn’t ready or your super nifty basework isn’t done, then drop your Open entry. This is another example of a serious time sink, cross this one off the list. c. If you are not “feeling” one of your painter or ordnance entries it is time to set it aside and concentrate on the one(s) you like. You paint work is invariably better on a piece that you enjoy working on. 2) Instead of working on a new piece look at other miniatures you have completed in the last six months. Chances are there is something you really like there and instead of working on the new piece work on improving one you have already finished (who knows maybe it doesn’t even need extra work). 3) Instead of working on an entry for each of the manufacturer awards make the hard decision and pick one or maybe none at all. [This is a corollary of #1]. Note that if you are painting a Reaper mini you are always in consideration for a Sophie Trophy. 4) Not entering means not getting feedback from the judges on your work. If you really want to improve then critical feedback is what you need. Seriously in the end just enter something even if it is not the piece you originally intended on entering. While the Reaper forums are a nice place to show off, it is a notoriously bad place to get real, make me cry, feedback on things you can improve. It’s a friendly supportive community and sometimes that’s not what you need when you are trying to break that gold medal barrier.
  11. Heisler

    THE FANTASY TRIP is back...

    And my encounter with Harlan Ellison was really good!
  12. Heisler

    THE FANTASY TRIP is back...

    The early days of Steve Jackson Games and the interactions with Thompson are quite interesting. Shades of Palladium!
  13. Heisler

    THE FANTASY TRIP is back...

    Jackson didn't buy the rights to Ogre, GEV and One Page Bulge (actually not sure about this one) when he bought Space Gamer. Those all fell to him as part of the first lawsuit between him and Thompson. He tried to get TFT at the same time but there was something around the copyright that allowed Thompson to hang on to those properties. I was at the Origins in San Francisco which took place at the Dunfey Hotel the first year that Jackson attended as Steve Jackson games. That's were Thompson released A Fistful of Turkeys. I was on the shuttle bus with Jackson trying to figure out how to get my vendor badge as I was working for Dimension Six at the time (volunteer) and Mark Simmons had mis-communicated where I should meet him. Jackson offered to sneak me in. He loaded me up with boxes of product and got me into the vendors room. That was my last good contact with him. The next time I saw him he had been brought in by a competing convention in Denver trying to go up against Genghis Con when I was running it. He left their show (ICON I think) and came over to ours and pretty much acted like a jerk and expected us to kowtow to him, pretty much lost all respect for him at that point. However, I have multiple copies of all the TFT stuff because I really enjoyed it although it never came close to replacing D&D for my group. I'm on the fence with this one.
  14. Heisler

    Reapercon 2018 Enthusiasm and Chatter

    If you are working on multiple entries drop everything and work on the one that is closest to being finished. Concentrate on that piece and you should be able to finish. Most of us get distracted by working on to many entries and end up right where you are now. The other option is to go back and look at pieces you have finished in the past six months and enter one or more of those. You could even take some time and improve the work on one or more of those as well. There are always options. The competition is really there to get feedback, real honest feedback, so that you can improve.
  15. That is correct, all competition entries must be entered by the artist, no exceptions.
  16. So you are coming to ReaperCon and its coming fast, especially for those of us still working away on our entries. ReaperCon is a rather unique convention and there is nothing else quite like it out there. Since the focus is on miniatures and painting this is a good convention to enter into the painting competition especially if its your first time. Now that sounds scary I know, you have heard that some of the "big" names are going to be entering why should you bother? ReaperCon's painting competition is in a much friendlier format than most (not all, but most) game convention painting competitions. Its a good place to get your feet wet. You can check out the rules on the ReaperCon.com website. But really what does all that mean? First let's take a look at the categories, there are only four of them. Why four? All the other shows seem to have a dozen categories. We have modeled this competition from the one used by MMSI, which is also used by a good chunk of the military/historical painting shows. The idea is that you don't need a dozen or so categories when we aren't going to award a 1st, 2nd and 3rd place (sometimes referred to as podium or trophy judging). Instead we want to reward you for the hard work you have put into your entry. Instead of 1st-3rd we award gold, silver, and bronze medals along with certificates of merit, this is known as the Open (or medal) system. Since we are going to reward you for your work we don't need a dozen categories to give people as many chances as possible to win an award. Instead we want you to focus your painting on what you do best and four categories is all we need. The titles can be a bit confusing so let's take a look at them. Painter - The focus here is on a single stock miniature. While presentation (i.e. basing) is a factor an elaborate base isn't what the judges are focusing on. I use the term stock here because essentially you are using the mini right out the package. Conversion work whether its elaborate or simple is not considered, although a poorly done conversion can hurt your score. Open - The focus of this category at ReaperCon is a bit different than it is at an historical show so be aware of that if you go to MMSI in Chicago or Lone Star here in Texas. What is acceptable for ReaperCon may not qualify as Open there. Our Open category is primarily on the conversion of existing miniatures, scratch sculpts and elaborate basing. Painting is still a factor but its not weighed quite as heavily as it is in Painter. So if you have spent as much time on the base as the miniature and want it considered as part of your score then this is the category for you. Dioramas/Vignettes - While this category is pretty standard at game convention competitions, at MMSI and similar shows these typically go into the Open category. This category is focused on story telling through the use of miniatures and basing. There are different ways to define dioramas and vignettes. The simplest I have seen is that a diorama has more than 3 figures on the base and a vignette has 3 or fewer figures. Painting is still a component of this category but the emphasis is on presentation in the sense that you are trying to convey a story or message to the viewer. Keep it as simple as you can, while I have seen some wonderful complicated dioramas out there sometimes there is so much action they muddy the story. Keep this mind, if you have to explain your story to some one looking at your scene then you have failed to convey your message. A diorama or vignette needs to stand on its own and convey the story without explanation from its creator. Here is a clue, if you can't figure out a title for your diorama, then you may not know what your story really is. Vehicles/Ordnance - This category is for those things of a mechanical nature, subject to a bit of interpretation. A horse drawn wagon is a vehicle. In this case the wagon and its team of horses would be judged as they are the "vehicle", while the riders are not considered for the painting portion but would be considered as part of the presentation. It can get a little complex. So what about this medal stuff and how do I know I won? You can think of the medals as a grade awarded by a team of judges. What the judges don't do is compare your work to the entry right next to you (which may actually be judged by a different team anyway). The judges will score your work without comparing to other entries. If they decide you have earned gold, then you will receive a gold medal for your entry. You can only win one medal in each category. It works like this; each piece is scored by each of the three judges on the team independently of each other (so you get 3 scores). If you have multiple entries in Painter they will discuss which piece they are going to judge. They do not discuss what score they are going to award a piece. After determining the piece to be judged each judge assigns a score from 0 (yes Zero) - 4. When they have finished working all the pieces on their list those sheets are handed in and one of the staff members totals everything up to determine the score. So not even the judges know what what the final score for a piece actually was until the awards ceremony. Those three scores for your piece are added up to determine what medal you receive: 0-1 no award, 2-4 Certificate of Merit, 5-7 Bronze, 8-10 Silver, 11-12 Gold. The Award Ceremony is Saturday Night. Hey! The rules say I can enter as many miniatures as I want, why can I only get one medal per category? Yes, you can have as many entries as you want in each category. As mentioned above though the judges will only score one of those entries in that category. An initial conversation is held to determine which piece will be scored, its often along the lines of "I can score this miniature higher than that one". Judges will score the piece that they think is your best work (which may not be what you consider your best work, it happens). So while you can certainly enter all "20" single miniatures you painted this year in the competition you are only going to get a medal for one of them. The judges will go through this process for each category, hence why the maximum number of medals you can receive is 4. There are other awards as well, the Sophie Trophy, the Theme Award, and various manufacturer awards. These are judged separately and use the more traditional 1st - 3rd method (in essence that can be boiled down to this miniature has fewer painting flaws than that miniature). Its possible that a single entry could win multiple awards. The judges do have the prerogative to score your entire display if they can't reach a decision on a single piece or they feel that the display of miniatures, as a whole, is worthy of being rewarded with a medal. What was my score and why did I get it? After the awards ceremony and when the painting competition hall is open you can ask not only what scores your mini received but who judged it. Most of the judges are taken from the ranks of the instructors at ReaperCon with a couple of exceptions (myself for one, although I do teach on occasion) so your miniatures are being judged by people that are knowledgeable about painting and how to do it. We use teams because we feel (and its one of the reasons MMSI developed this system) that a combined score is more indicative of what a mini should get rather than depending on a single judge to know everything and be neutral on all the different painting techniques that are out there. To find out what the judges were thinking you will have to track them down. Most of us are more than happy to discuss the whys and wherefores just be aware of our time and that you may be taking up the only 15 minutes we have to eat. Be considerate. Some Hints for Entering 1) Every piece has to have a name or title. To speed up registration please already know the name or title before you get to the front of the line! Write it down before hand if you need to! As I mentioned before if you don't already know the name of your diorama or vignette you may have an issue with your story. 2) Don't bring everything you painted in the last six months. Yes, I know it says unlimited but really if you painted "20" miniatures this year is the first one better than your last three? Odds are the last three or four are probably more indicative of your best work. Try to keep you numbers down to around 5 or fewer per category. 3) Make sure your bases are at least finished in the Painter category. While presentation is not a huge chunk of the percentage in this category a nicely finished base will show off your miniature better than the base you tried out different color combinations on or used to wipe excess paint off your brush on. 4) Make sure your entry is well fastened to its base, you don't want to be subjected to the "Heisler Affect". If you mount your mini on a pedestal style base, judges tend to see that as a handle. If the mini is not attached when its picked up by the "handle" its going to hit the table, probably to disastrous effect. 5) Make sure the paint is dry when you hand in your mini for the competition! 6) You must enter all your miniatures at the same time. You cannot bring them in as you finish them in the painting room. So if you have 5 entries for each category then you have to bring all 20 entries at once, not a couple at a time. 7) Remember that if you have ReaperCon Full Weekend badge your entries must be in by 5pm on FRIDAY night. No exceptions. 8) If you have a Saturday only badge your entries must be in by 12 Noon on SATURDAY. No exceptions. If you have a ReaperCon full weekend pass you cannot enter on Saturday you missed your cutoff. 9) Displaying your work. There are things you can do to help your pieces stand out, especially if you have multiple entries. We do have a limited supply of blocks and black felt so you can separate your minis out from the crowd a bit and do a multi level display. Please be aware of how much room your taking up or a judge may come by and consolidate your display if you are taking up 2' of space for 4 minis. Bringing your own display backdrop (again spacing!) will make your minis standout. While this isn't going to have an affect on your score (judges usually pick the entries up) it will draw people in to look at your work. 10) Blending. I have had a couple of questions about blending. Blending doesn't necessarily have to be perfect it depends on the type of technique or painter you are trying to emulate. For instance Alfonso "Banshee" Giraldes' technique or style doesn't require perfect blends it does require excellent understanding of the play of light and the shadows it creates. So this is likely to be pretty subjective. If I think of other things I'll add them to the list.
  17. Heisler

    Getting To Know You July

    One of my first computer games used audio tape.
  18. Heisler

    Getting To Know You July

    Sigh, I actually used the 8" Floppy Disks.
  19. Found it; Scale Creep Miniatures
  20. I do believe that you will have to order Coat d'Arms direct. I have never seen them carried by anyone in the US. I usually just put a piece of pewter sprue from cleaning up miniatures in my vallejo bottles to help keep them mixed up. Be careful that you don't put something in there that will rust.
  21. I think I would have to see it to really comment on it. Again Doug's comments are pretty much spot on. I know that Proctor and I would lean towards filling that space with something easter egg like. It doesn't, and shouldn't, be very much although perhaps an object that your fighter is trying to retrieve would be worth considering.
  22. Totally on board with Doug on this point. Nothing wrong with a two figure combat scene, it has action, direction and story. Although a third element could be added, it does not necessarily need to be a figure, it could be something decorative that is not going to overpower the other two pieces. Groups don't always have to be characters sometimes an object can fill the role as well.
  23. Heisler

    Reaper Diorama (77254,77550,77399,77454)

    I think you are looking pretty good at this point. Its hard to reverse engineer anything else to the base now. It just occurred to me that one figure actually fighting from the steps themselves would create a more dynamic scene. However, there seems to be a pretty good flow to the action.
  24. Heisler

    Reaper Diorama (77254,77550,77399,77454)

    I like that much better. Still need to do something with the right side (in the picture) maybe just extend the wall across that way as well and cut off what ever else is in the back.
  25. Heisler

    Diorama Advice

    Right now I would say the size is just about perfect. it just depends on if you are going to add anything and how big those pieces are.
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