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Guindyloo

House Figmentius
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Everything posted by Guindyloo

  1. Incidentally, and I know that not everyone learns the same way that I do, but I don't generally take classes at Reapercon for things that I'm interested in learning about, I take classes on subjects that I've already put in a lot of time on. Sometimes that results in moments of "oh geez, if I would've known that sooner, I would've struggled a lot less" but more often than not, it's more of a feeling of helping something to click in my head or it helps me to see something differently or it's seeing something done that I just couldn't quite manage on my own. For example, I have been working on figuring out NMM these past few months, but I didn't take any NMM classes at Reapercon because at the time that the classes went on sale, I didn't feel like I'd put enough time into working on NMM that I'd get the same benefit as I would if I put in the time on practical learning. However, in working on my diorama entry, someone (me) had the stupid idea to go the NMM route with anything metallic on it. Some of it ended up clicking for me. Some of it was a disaster. But it was the time that I needed to put in...and fortunately, @Kuro Cleanbrush was kind enough to sit down with me and Buglips to go over NMM during one of his breaks (thanks again, Ian, it was super helpful! I really, really appreciate the way you explain things and NMM aside, you finally did what I had been trying to do but hadn't been successful at - you convinced Buglips to use a wet palette! ) and that was a really good next step that I really needed and I think will set me up really well to practice for the next year and then take a NMM class or two next year. If I were to set foot into a Reapercon classroom with no prior knowledge on the subject, for the way that I learn, I'd just be wasting my time. I'm not really there to be taught the steps of how to do something, I'm there to take in the instructor's knowledge and thought processes and approaches. But, again, that's me and I know very well what is conducive to my learning and what is not.
  2. Guindyloo

    Critit Animal Companions Miniatures

    As best as I can tell (from my measly 10 minutes of research on their facebook and website), no they do not appear to have experience with making minis. They appear to have a pretty successful business selling what look like very nice gaming accessories (over 4000 sales on Etsy with all good feedback) and they have some D&D miniatures in their shop, but this appears to be their first foray into making miniatures themselves. "Critit started out as a shop making wooden gifts and toys, my love of RPG gaming propelled it to be your one stop shop for all your gaming accessories. I welcome custom orders and love to hear your ideas." ETA more from their Etsy page: "I have been making wooden items for many years now, I was lucky enough to learn my trade in carpentry during an apprenticeship where I grew up in Germany. Having worked a number of jobs I have now decided to realise my dream of running my own business.I ran a kickstarter project where I was fortunate to exceed my goal allowing me to finally purchase a shed/workshop to allow me to fully concentrate on my creations and take my starting business to the next level. Starting out making wooden decor items and Toys was great but my love of RPG games shone through and a range of gaming boxes where made and put on the website, these boxes where so popular I decided to fully concentrate on them and new products to turn my buisness into Critit.co.uk - Everything for the RPG gamer!I enjoy every aspect of making the accessories and have met some fab people along the way. Custom boxes are a particular favourite as the ideas sent through are amazing and it shines through what a creative bunch us RPG gamers are :-)Hope you find something you like :-)" Also found the Kickstarter creator page: https://www.kickstarter.com/profile/163050832/created They have previously successfully (as far as I can tell) run 5 kickstarters for dice. A 6th one (not the most recent one) was cancelled
  3. Guindyloo

    Pottermore - What did you get?

    Yep! Apparently it's very rare as a patronus....but I don't know if it's just telling me that or it legit really is rare. http://harrypotter.wikia.com/wiki/Abraxan
  4. Guindyloo

    Pottermore - What did you get?

    I have never not gotten Slytherin from a sorting quiz. Wand: Laurel wood with a unicorn hair core, 10 ¼ and rigid flexibility Patronus: Abraxan Winged Horse Not the least bit interested in Ilvermorny.
  5. I had to cancel from the first one due to bad timing and ended up picking up Charon at retail because it was my favourite of the campaign with the Gorgon's Cave in a close second. I was able to go in on this one but it was difficult narrowing it down.
  6. Guindyloo

    Randomness XIV: THE FLOOR IS LAVA!

    @WhiteWulfe You will need to search for "qpproductions" on etsy. I don't think Shannon has any of her paint poker tools in the shop right now, but send her a message over her etsy and she can help you out for sure. I got a couple of them from her at Reapercon as well, as did Buglips.
  7. That's understandable. Aradia's pieces are quality enough to justify the price, but that still doesn't make it easy on the wallet. It was such a weirdly quiet campaign. Only 180 backers and only 35 comments, a good half of which were Aradia and also a good half of them aren't in English. Like no one even said anything about it funding in the main comments, only one comment on the update. It's weird to me because the figures are gorgeous but, obviously, quite pricey so one would think that all 180 of us had to be pretty excited about them to shell out the money but you can practically hear crickets in that comment section.
  8. Am I the only one that went in on this? It funded last night.
  9. Guindyloo

    BASIUS : MAX

    Ah, gotcha. It's hard to tell since they've run their kickstarters under a couple of different company names. I didn't remember there being big pads - I pledged for Basius 3 in 2016. Perhaps that was the first time they released the smaller ones, I'm not sure.
  10. I think you're doing what most people should be doing. My first Reapercon I'd been painting for almost 2 years and still took all Beginner classes because otherwise I was fully self taught via the forum and youtube. My second year I took half Beginner classes. This year I don't think I took anything that was labeled Beginner, I think they were all Intermediate, but that's only because I happened to have specific priorities. I don't think that I will ever be too good to hear different perspectives on painting. I think that if I ever think that I already know everything there is to know on a certain topic, then my ego would certainly have taken over and I'd be doing myself a disservice, especially if I'm not open to the perspective of someone that I can clearly see is a more skilled painter than I am.
  11. Guindyloo

    BASIUS : MAX

    Those are WAY bigger than the previous versions they've offered and now they're double sided so that's the very steep price increase. Not so great if you're looking for a lot of variety. I really like the way smaller Basius pads that I got previously, they're great quality and relatively easy to use. I don't think I'll be backing this time around though, I just don't have any need for the huge pads. I'd be in if they were offering the smaller versions again to pick some that I didn't get previously.
  12. I personally think that mandatory prerequisite classes are not a good idea. Suggested prerequisite classes? Sure. But that's assuming that the same classes are available every year with the exact same content and that those classes were able to cover all of the intended content. I feel a particular aversion to the idea of giving certificates to class attendees. An hour and 45 minutes with 10 or so other students is not long enough to certify that anyone in a class actually learned or improved on anything. No matter what you put on that certificate, even if it clearly states "THIS IS ONLY TO CERTIFY THAT SO AND SO TOOK THIS CLASS AND DOES NOT IMPLY THAT THIS PERSON HAS MASTERED THIS SUBJECT BY ANY DEFINITION OF THE WORD" you would still have people that would get angry that the certificate didn't somehow magically make them a Crystal Brush winning painter. Even worse, it could make less experienced painters think that even though they didn't fully grasp the topic, they have a certificate in that subject, so they won't bother to take any additional classes on that topic, even though they could strongly benefit from multiple perspectives on the same topic. The main problem is that the terminology of Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced uses these very broad terms for something that's very, very complicated. They're not standardized, they're not defining anything particular and they don't properly convey that there are different layers to different techniques and some of them are more advanced than others. For instance, I would think of most NMM as being a strongly Intermediate technique. It's a complicated subject with a lot of theory involved as well as actual paint application. So within that very difficult subject, there's a lot of benefit to having a "Beginner" NMM class. It's still an Intermediate technique that's going to require a good foundation of skills to get into it, but anyone trying to learn it strongly needs the beginning steps of it. But in my opinion, a Beginner class for NMM should still be labeled as an Intermediate class because anyone who doesn't have a good grasp of blending and at least a decent understanding of how light works in the context of miniatures is almost certainly going to struggle even with the beginning steps of NMM. I think this was more a fail on the Growtix site than the fault of any of the instructors. It's my understanding that your class form had a dropdown box for you to label your classes appropriately. One would have thought that would have done the job, but instead, Growtix used those labels to sort the classes if you happened to be a person that specifically went and did so, (I doubt that many people did, I think more people just looked at the time schedule) but didn't display those labels otherwise in the class name or description. I would not expect any of the instructors to have not realized that they needed to label their classes multiple times. If Growtix is used next year, I would hope that could be fixed directly and that would perhaps solve some of the confusion. If there were to be any standardized implementation of terminology used for class descriptions, I think that's something that would be best left up to Reaper and the instructors. I don't think there's any simple solution whatsoever, but I do think that it would be helpful for instructors to know that, for instance, putting 101 in the title of a class that is listed as Intermediate is confusing to students who are thinking in very broad terms. Unfortunately, you're never going to solve the issue of people overestimating their skill levels and taking classes that are out of their depth. I think it's very difficult for a lot of people to remove themselves emotionally from their painting and knock it back to just skills, leaving their pride behind. You could call it the Dunning-Kruger effect and I think that may be the case for some people, but more generally I just think it's very human and very understandable. A lot of people have a very visceral response to the thought of being labeled a beginner at something that they've poured a lot of time and effort and a piece of themselves into. I think it's the same thing that makes people unable to hear critique. So since it's not something that's really solvable, I think that a good resource to have on the Reapercon website would be a section on "What to do if you find yourself overwhelmed or out of your depth in a class" that could help both students and instructors. It could be included in an article on general class etiquette like hey, maybe don't take up other students' and the instructor's time with questions about priming or thinning paints in a completely unrelated Intermediate+ class, as those kind of questions would be better suited to asking outside of class. There's nothing wrong with taking some classes on topics that are beyond your current ability, IMO, if you think that hearing a lecture may benefit you even if you can't necessarily put the techniques into practice. The problem starts when a student who isn't prepared monopolizes everyone's time. A write up of some sort explaining such and encouraging potential students to contact teachers or organizers prior to class like @Wren suggested could go a long way to preventing such occurrences and keeping people from getting frustrated. It could be as simple as letting a teacher know right before class "Hey I don't think I'm going to be able to keep up with anything hands on, but I wanted to sit in on the class to start building a foundation on the topic." I think at least most instructors wouldn't have a problem with that and I know that at least most of them would strongly encourage that student to come see them at Artist's Row to give them more one on one assistance if possible.
  13. I know you thought you could sneak by without a birthday thread by starting the other threads yourself the past couple of weeks, but I'm onto you. Have a very, very Happy Birthday, @Tripleh5133!!!
  14. Guindyloo

    Practice?

    You're right, I don't begin to imagine such things because I just start to hear "blah blah blah" whenever I sense you slipping past my nerd threshold. I've barely heard a word you've ever said. That's why we get along so well.
  15. Guindyloo

    Practice?

    ....like how to lie about being a graduate of Starfleet Academy?
  16. Guindyloo

    Randomness XIV: THE FLOOR IS LAVA!

    Yeah but I don't recommend to other people that they cut toward themselves, if I'm using an x-acto in front of other people (you don't count) I point out to people that I'm doing something I shouldn't be doing and if they choose to do it the same way, it's at their own risk just like I'm taking that risk by my own choice because I'm more comfortable using the tool that way, just like Doug and Andy are saying they're more comfortable using the scalpel blade the way they use it. I'm not arguing with anyone using a tool in the way that works for them, I just don't want anyone to read the way they're using it, not realize that it's not the recommended way to use it and end up in the ER. People should read it, acknowledge that it's being utilized in a way that it wasn't intended for and proceed at their own risk. Unfortunately, the onus is on the person recommending the thing because amazon sells them without any instructions or warnings. Just for you, I'll turn off the camera whenever I feel like cutting toward myself with my x-acto. That way you can sit there in dread with no context for what may or may not be happening instead.
  17. Guindyloo

    Practice?

    It's unnerving to me when you make sense.
  18. Guindyloo

    Sunshine Figures

    So I had too much going on and forgot that I wanted to add $40 to my pledge in order to get Gytha, Lilly AND Altea. But someone else wanted to add funds for one of the stretch goals post-campaign as well, so I just put in my survey that I wanted to give them another $40 for Altea when they charge shipping. Should be fine. ETA: They accepted my request and sent me a paypal request for the additional $40 immediately afterward, then confirmed with me the 3 busts that I'd chosen after I'd paid that.
  19. Guindyloo

    Practice?

    I split quotes by quoting the person, deleting everything from the quote that I don't want to respond to, responding to that part, then quoting their post again and deleting the irrelevant parts again. It pretty much only works if the person you're quoting is still on the same page of the thread as you or else it's too much of a pain. Sometimes I'm even too lazy to scroll back up. It's important to know what motivates you and what demotivates you so that you can tailor your actions in the way that best benefits you, and yet it can be really difficult to figure such things out. It sounds like you've done a great job at identifying at least some of your road blocks, so well done, that'll serve you well. The black and white print and then paint over it is something that Marike Reimer does, as well as painting in swatches of the paints she used so that she can recreate mixes later, so you're in good company with that. You are absolutely good enough to paint it, you just may not have yet acquired the skills to paint it exactly the way that you see in your mind and that's ok. I think we all, myself included, need to get away from this terminology of being "good enough" as it's such defeatist language and can be so discouraging to think of yourself as not being good enough. I've talked about this similar theme before that painting isn't going from step A to Z and there's no one true path to painting a figure. There's different methods and styles and schools of thought that can take you in any number of directions. Painting a figure is like being inside of a maze that's different for every person and has multiple paths to get to the end of the maze and depending on which of the paths you take, you get a different result. Because the maze is different for everyone, no one can really successfully map it out for someone else. They can give suggestions for how they found the end of their own maze and they can even give you a step by step tutorial for how they traversed their maze, but they can't give you the exact answers because your maze generated itself differently based on your past experiences, not theirs. It's far more of a journey than being bad or good. So I think instead of thinking "I'm not good enough", we should ask ourselves if we're far enough on our painting journey to get where we want to go on that particular figure. And really, there's only one way to find out and that's not to shove it back into a drawer. I'm glad my rambles are sometimes useful to people.
  20. Guindyloo

    Randomness XIV: THE FLOOR IS LAVA!

    I didn't mean to be fussing or make y'all feel like you needed to defend yourselves. But when you're recommending a medical tool that is specifically made to cut flesh, I think the disclaimers should follow pretty close behind. We want to have educated sacrifices to the hobby gods.
  21. Guindyloo

    Randomness XIV: THE FLOOR IS LAVA!

    See now if Hedgie were making such a promise, I'd believe it. You, not so much.
  22. Guindyloo

    Randomness XIV: THE FLOOR IS LAVA!

    Don't try to sweet talk me now.
  23. Guindyloo

    Randomness XIV: THE FLOOR IS LAVA!

    I'm going to eat your unicorn cereal when I get home. On camera so you can see me eating the deliciousness but can't have any of it yourself.
  24. Guindyloo

    Randomness XIV: THE FLOOR IS LAVA!

    I know you can't see it right now, but I am shaking my head at you and making a face like this.
  25. Guindyloo

    Randomness XIV: THE FLOOR IS LAVA!

    Lord, Doug, I want him to keep all of his fingers! If you're going to use scalpel blades, then get the scalpel blade handle as well, but if you get a handle, then you need a pair of well gripped pliers - preferably actual forceps as well because you use the forceps to grip the blade to attach the blade and take it off so that you don't cut your finger off. (Check youtube for how to videos.) I assisted in surgeries for 13 years and never once cut myself with a scalpel blade due to safe practices. You really do need to be cautious with them. Without a proper handle, it would be safer to use them with no handle at all rather than something they could slip out of.
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