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Guindyloo

House Figmentius
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Everything posted by Guindyloo

  1. Guindyloo

    What does C&C mean (to you)?

    I've often chimed in on this topic when it's come up in the past and much of my opinion on the matter has evolved over time. So if anything I'm about to say contradicts my thoughts on the topic from before, well, that's why. Much of the issue regarding people not giving/receiving criticism is due to the fact that the miniature painting hobby is really an amalgamation of a couple of hobbies and not everyone has the same goal in mind. Inarah certainly points that out. Some people paint just because they like putting paint on things, some people paint for the tabletop and prioritize getting it done over anything else, some people paint for the tabletop but also want their paint jobs to be display worthy, some people paint for display but are ok with it not being award worthy, some people paint for display but want to be competition ready, some people paint solely for competition, some people are following a path toward becoming a professional painter, etc. There's so many different paths. But, IMO, the majority of miniature painters are tabletop painters. Most people just want to get paint on their figures to get them on the table because the gaming is what is most important to them. A smaller majority of those tabletop painters are looking to improve upon their painting as they go, so they take classes, they seek out tutorials and feedback and actively work toward improving. But most tabletop painters don't care about improving on the quality of their paint jobs. They may claim that they do, but either they think that it's what they're supposed to say or they're simply lying to themselves, or they have the best of intentions but just don't realize that improving on their painting simply isn't their priority. Moreover, most of the time the improvement that they're seeking has more to do with improving the speed of their paint jobs and/or getting better results from speed painting, but it's not about improving their technical skills. Now that's just my opinion from what I have observed overall in the hobby, I may be incorrect in that assessment but I don't think that I am. The thing is, I don't say these things to be negative or look down on tabletop painters by any means. Some people do and I think that's nonsense. Just because I'm not a tabletop painter doesn't mean that I have any say over the way that someone else enjoys their hobby. So please don't misunderstand where I'm coming from. Every single person who picks up a paint brush deserves to be encouraged no matter what their goal with that paint brush is. Furthermore, it is most certainly not just a problem with tabletop painters claiming to want genuine feedback but not accepting it. There are quite a lot of display painters who have the same sort of issues where they're asking for criticism and don't really mean it and they say that they want to improve but really they're happy painting the way that they paint. It happens and it's very human. But when you have this clash of different priorities, it causes confusion on what people's priorities are and/or should be. So you get people asking for criticism when they don't really want it so then someone comes along seeing them specifically ask for critique and so they dedicate a big chunk of time to trying to help this person, only to be met with someone who doesn't appreciate the time and effort spent on them and just throws back excuses. I don't mean explanations, I mean excuses; those are 2 different things. Explanation: "Yeah, I agree, that area turned out really rough because I didn't thin my paints enough." Excuse: "Well I couldn't do anything about that area being rough because the paint dried too fast." Even worse, these excuses can be aggressive, as though the person giving the criticism has said something wrong by pointing out something. That's frustrating and will eventually make someone stop trying to give people critique even when they see it directly asked for. No one has an infinite amount of time to keep giving to people who don't appreciate it. (I just want to be really clear that some of the people that I've taken the time to critique have been really lovely and grateful. This is a general complaint and not meant to call anyone specific out. This happens not just to me, but is a very common complaint that I have heard from other people who have stopped bothering to try to give critique/advice to other people.) In the hobby in general, there is a large proportion of people who say that they want to improve but don't actually make the effort to do so. And you know what? That's ok. That's on that person to do whatever makes them happy. I would want to see them encouraged just as much as someone who dedicates all of their free time to trying to improve or falls somewhere in the middle. Every single person deserves encouragement. The big problem is, some people don't just want encouragement, they feel entitled to being praised. And this is made worse by the fact that most people don't know the difference between encouragement and praise. Praise: "Wow! You did a great job!" Encouragement: "I can tell you put a lot of work into your paint job and it paid off!" There's nothing wrong with praising something that you think deserves it and we all have different tastes, but encouragement is far more valuable. You can even encourage someone whose paint job you don't like that you think looks terrible, because encouragement respects the time and effort and work that went into the paint job. Praise only focuses on the end result and if you give the same praise to something that you don't really like as you give to something that you really do, what's the point of it? It's just dishonest. Furthermore, people need to understand the difference between personal preference and criticism. There are few things more irritating than asking for feedback and being told that you should have painted something a different way or a different colour or making a "helpful" suggestion that you should do some kind of insane freehand or other technically advanced technique on something when you were clearly not going in that direction. Bad: "You should make her look like this obscure anime figure that I love." Also Bad: "I like to use this specific colour in the shadows for that colour, so you should do that too." Now I'm not talking about jokes, like someone always jokingly suggesting that people should paint everything their favourite colour or someone jokingly saying you should paint the Sistine chapel on a shield. I'm talking about people literally suggesting their personal preferences or what they wish that they could do with the figure but know that they're not capable of doing. I'm literally paraphrasing things that have been said to me and that I have seen said to other people unfortunately quite often. To swing back around to the original question, C&C obviously stands for Comments & Criticism. And when I see someone say that they want C&C, I read that as they want a true critique, not just the usual feedback. And here's where I'm really going to diverge from my past opinions and this may be the most controversial thing that I'm going to say in this post, but I'm just going to have to take the chance that a few more of you are going to stop liking me because I have opinions. But not only do I think that people asking for C&C shouldn't then reject the criticism that they get by getting defensive, I also don't think that people on this forum or in this hobby in general should ever expect not to be criticized when they choose to post something that they've painted onto a public forum. The main damage that using "C&C" in posts does is it gives people something to hide behind to escape criticism. You can't say anything that isn't explicitly sunshine and rainbows here just because that person didn't specifically ask for feedback. That's nonsense. The term itself is nonsense. Comments and Criticism welcome? So, what, if you don't put C&C you don't expect comments at all? Of course not, you expect comments, you just don't want the criticism that comes with them. And unfortunately, those of us who have wasted time trying to get people to create more of a culture of open constructive criticism on the forum by wanting to mark posts as ok to post criticism in have actually done the forum a further disservice by legitimizing the nonsensical narrative that it's mean to criticize someone's paint job if they didn't specifically ask you to do so. If you post a picture of something that you've painted onto the internet, you are asking for feedback on it. If all you want is praise, then just show your friends and family. And until people on this forum stop perpetuating that narrative that says only mean people are critical of other people's paint jobs and the only way to be nice is to heap praise onto it unless they've specifically asked you for criticism, this forum is going to continue its reputation for being too huggy and it's going to continue to lose people who are actively trying to improve their painting and ultimately just discourage people from bothering to post their work at all. Now allow me to reiterate in case you've forgotten about the top part of my post because I've rambled on for too long - everyone deserves encouragement. Every single person in this hobby. I would never, ever, want to see anyone on this forum being mean to someone who painted something. But anyone who is posting pictures of their hobby work onto a public forum is making a choice to open themselves up to criticism and anyone who is choosing only to indiscriminately heap praise on everything they see is wasting the painter's and their own time, lying to people and doing a great disservice to anyone who's actively trying to improve. And I see this said all the time and I used to say it myself, some people don't feel comfortable criticizing a painter that they believe to be at a higher skill level than they are and I understand that, I really do. And what you certainly shouldn't do is pretend that you can give advice that you're not qualified to give. There are a lot of parrots in this hobby who see advice and then spout it back out at people even though they don't actually know how to apply it so they can't actually help with whatever it is, all they can do is repeat a phrase that they saw somewhere. You absolutely shouldn't do that. Give advice on the topics that you feel comfortable with and leave the other advice to people who know what they're talking about on the things that you don't. That doesn't mean that you can't encourage that person, it also doesn't mean that you can't point someone in the right direction by suggesting another person that you know can help or give them a link to a tutorial that looks promising. You can help someone without being an authority on a subject and without pretending to be one. For instance, I'm terrible at math. So if someone was struggling to solve a math problem, I definitely shouldn't say "You need to use Pythagorean Theorem for that." I don't have the slightest clue how to apply Pythagorean Theorem, I just know that it's a thing that exists. But I sure as hell can hand that person a calculator and say "I don't know how to solve that, but my friend over there is better at math than I am, maybe he can help you." Similarly, I shouldn't say "You're awesome at math! " whether they've actually solved it or just jotted down a "2" in the answer space. If you don't feel qualified to give advice on a paint job when you see something wrong with it and therefore you choose to just say "Awesome job!" who are you helping in that situation? The person you've just lied to or yourself by avoiding the uncomfortable situation of having to tell someone that they're not amazing? I think that there's this weird misconception that you can't give valuable feedback without giving a full-on critique. If you don't feel comfortable giving a full critique, then certainly don't feel like you have to. They're very involved and very time consuming and you need to understand how to properly critique in order to do so. I don't think that many people, if any at all, expect a huge in-depth write-up when they ask for C&C. And it's that same misconception that has led to people not asking for criticism because a critique like that is what's scary. There's nothing scary about (or at least shouldn't be) receiving a comment of "Your paints are looking a little thick, what are you using to thin them?" That's criticism and there's nothing wrong with it and there's nothing mean about it. But everyone wants to act like oh golly gee, we can't criticize people's paint jobs if they didn't specifically ask for it, some people don't want to deal with mean comments. Let me ask all of y'all, when was the last time that you saw anyone say anything mean to someone about their paint job on this forum? What's it been, years? Do you ever see anyone on this forum telling another painter that they suck or they shouldn't bother painting or any of the other things that people are so afraid of hearing that they refuse to give or receive any criticism at all? No, of course not, because people wouldn't tolerate it and I think that's a great thing. But it's gone so overboard that everything's "Good job!" whether it actually is a good job or not. So, yeah, I think it's a real shame that so many people view criticism as something that has to be and should be asked for, otherwise it's taboo. And I can sit here and ramble about it all I want, but unless people genuinely want to change things, it's going to continue to be a subject that's brought up from time to time that only ever gets addressed and not resolved. And people who want real criticism will just continue to speak privately amongst each other.
  2. Guindyloo

    LadyStorm's Winter Contest: Yeti

    I intend on entering. I've had an idea for it ever since ladystorm first posted it. I just don't have the yeti yet(i) because I don't remember why I didn't order it in October (maybe I'd already made an October order before the contest was posted?) and I didn't make a November order because the DD dwarf was a very nice sculpt but I have no interest in painting dwarves so I wanted to wait until December to see what the DD figure would be for this month.....and now I'm waiting to see what the 12 day offerings will be. It's fine, Reaper ships quickly and I apparently enjoy painting in a panic under a time constraint.
  3. Guindyloo Box has completed its circuit. I received it back from @Keianna toward the beginning of November, I just totally spaced on saying so.
  4. Guindyloo

    01416: Sophie in Cat Costume

    I finished up this lovely lady last night. She was wonderfully sculpted by Bob Ridolfi. I really enjoyed the details on her and she was a lot of fun to paint. I always mean to paint a Halloween figure before Halloween but am usually too busy to actually manage it. I got this figure while at Reapercon though and decided it was meant to be, so I put aside a couple of other things to make time for her. I had a lot of technical issues with her due to my clumsiness - I dropped her THREE times which resulted in extensive repair work and having to reattach her to the pumpkin each time. There’s no indentation or any other indication for how she’s meant to be attached to the pumpkin and assembly is not my strong suit so I struggled a bit with that part. The way I have her attached leaves her foot hanging past the base by a good bit so I’ll need to build the base up on a little bit of cork, but she looked the most correct to me this way. (She is currently still sitting on top of foam tape and the craft paint bottle that I used as a holder, I just painted them black for pictures.) I was asked over on facebook how I painted the wings, so I’ll copy that info over here as well: I basecoated with MSP Black Indigo. (That’s one of this year’s Reapercon swag bag paints. I think Nightmare Black would probably be fine to use in its place.) Then I layered up using paints from Nocturna’s Imperial Purple Set. They’re Vallejo paints made for Nocturna and I highly recommend both that set and the Crimson Red set. Both sets come with little painting guides and the purple one walks you through how to do both cold purples and warm purples. I went in the warm purple direction starting from the darkest colours and layering up to the lightest. So Imperial Purple > Purple Hex > Amethyst > Witch Purple > Lipstick. Then I glazed over everything with MSP Gothic Crimson which was also a LE Reapercon paint, I think from the 2016 swag bag. (I can’t think of a replacement for that off of the top of my head but it’s a wine-maroon colour.) Then in the areas that I wanted to darken, like the transitions going back into the shadows and the backs of the wings, I glazed with the Black Indigo.
  5. Thank you very much, Derek! My thoughts for Painters were that it would score Silver as well, so I'm glad to see we're in agreement. It's a great illustration that using all of the right colours and putting them in the right places, makes for a gorgeous high quality tabletop paint job, but not a Gold medal. If you would've only included the smaller pictures, I would've thought Gold, but the up close view provided a more critical view. I especially appreciate the insight into the other criteria as that gets a little fuzzier for me. I was less sure of how she would rate in Open because the resculpting work you did to convert her is so well executed, I wouldn't have even known you converted her without your WIP thread. I know that one of the comments for Open is for people to do more difficult/ambitious conversions to score higher though, so it's good to see that even a very well-executed simple conversion is still a simple conversion and won't get you those extra Difficulty points. Thank you, again, for taking the time and going into so much detail. This is very valuable insight that I'm sure I'll reference back to a lot in the future.
  6. Guindyloo

    Getting to Know Each Other, October 2018

    I'm so confused. Is this just the most roundabout way of asking what city I want to move to?
  7. What gorgeous colours! Yes, please! I think that would be very valuable information.
  8. Guindyloo

    Getting to Know Each Other, October 2018

    Daily? No parts. I usually try to glance at this thread but I even do that in spurts. I generally just pop in here and there, leaving devastation in my wake.
  9. Guindyloo

    50293: Bonnie, Muumuu Zombie

    Nice, I love those blues! Personally, I like that you didn't go for the usual route of hopelessly grimy. It makes sense with the sculpt anyway - the cloth isn't all tattered and shredded aside from the hole in the back nor is her skin all torn up, so makes sense to me that you wouldn't make her all filthy.
  10. Guindyloo

    Getting to Know Each Other, October 2018

    What if I just take the money and run?
  11. Guindyloo

    Getting to Know Each Other, October 2018

    HAHA NO. I'm a Millennial; I use my smart phone, Google and desperation.
  12. To be honest, Doug, I just scanned the article to get the major bullet points. I can't set up adblock on my work computer so I find most articles pretty unreadable these days with how many ads they've jam-packed into everything. I have ADD and when all that nonsense is flashing at me and paragraphs are literally moving to make room for more ads, I just can't even. That being said, I know you don't like a moral argument, but some people find them more compelling than others and when you're writing an article that is partially asking people not to buy things they love based on the pop culture they love, I can understand going in that direction. But like I said, I didn't read the entire thing so I can't reasonably defend that issue. I'll take your word that it was too heavily handed.
  13. Here's an article written by an IP lawyer on that exact subject: https://www.bleedingcool.com/2016/06/10/artists-alley-art-theft-and-copyright-law-a-lawyer-speaks-to-bleeding-cool/ (Just a heads up, there are a lot of ads on this page.) TLDR version is it's not legal, artists shouldn't do it and fans shouldn't buy it.
  14. Guindyloo

    Getting to Know Each Other, October 2018

    So funny thing...I assume you mean the octopus mug. When I bought that, I was at the mall with my work friends and one of them was looking for something for her little girl. I LOVE aquatic life and saw that mug and fell in love and was like "Is it a crime for me to get this even though I don't know what it's from?" My coworkers just looked at me. "He's from Finding Dory!" and I was like "Ok?" They couldn't believe I hadn't seen the movie. They did think that I would like the octopus though. So I bought it without having seen the movie or knowing the character name just because I liked it. I have since seen Finding Dory and do like Hank quite a lot, so I think it evened out.
  15. Agreed, I think it's going to be really easily taken down from kickstarter. I just think in the longterm and overall for the company, they just picked a fight that they're not only not going to win, but I imagine they're probably going to get entirely crushed. I think it mostly depends on how grumpy it makes the mouse. I think if they'd just put up the kickstarter, it'd be as simple as having kickstarter pull it and a C&D letter to stop them from selling them through other avenues. Nice try, better luck next time. But registering them, that's a completely different intent and that's what makes me think this is likely to push further than a C&D.
  16. It's filed in bad faith. They were well aware of what they were doing and they thought registering their blatantly stolen work would give them a leg to stand on. I don't think it will, especially not against the notoriously ruthless Disney, I think it'll make things worse for them. In my not professional opinion, the filing with the UK copyright office is very intentional fraud. The thought process behind intentionally stealing someone else's work and then having it registered... I think it's really gross and I really think this is going to go very, very poorly for them.
  17. Wow I don't like that response at all.
  18. I've been seeing updates about this on facebook. They are very blatant about directly copying faces. "Compass Captain' Mad Brother" is Nicholas Cage, "Compass Captain' Drunken Brother" is Steven Tyler and "Octoman Pirate" is Sir Anthony Hopkins. They shared the exact pictures of the actors that the faces were copied from. I don't think there's anything wrong with being inspired by and using the facial features of real people, but they were very obviously marketing it as "Here's a Steven Tyler as a pirate figure!" Just doesn't seem right to me all around. It's a shame because I think the sculpting is really beautiful and well detailed, but those are some murky, murky waters they're sailing those pirates in and I think it's well past my comfort level.
  19. Guindyloo

    01416: Sophie in Cat Costume

    Thanks again, I'm really glad y'all like her! I mean, I would call them Halloween colours, but sure, if you're into colour theory, that's cool too. Yes! Paint all the Halloween things!
  20. Guindyloo

    Getting to Know Each Other, October 2018

    I'm going to kind of break this down into three parts. What I like about the hobby the most is having a creative outlet. I am endlessly fascinated by the act of bringing these little figures to life with a little bit of paint. Having that outlet turned out to be really, really important for me. What keeps me going through the rough spots the most is having people close to me that know exactly what I'm going through that I can bounce my thoughts off of and get advice from. I need a very specific sort of pep talk at times (that rarely includes any sort of traditional "pep") and I'm very lucky to have a couple of people in my life who are able to give me that sort of feedback. What lifts me up the most is the giving nature of the professionals in this hobby. Sometimes that's giving advice, even just a brief suggestion, sometimes it's full on giving instruction and knowledge, sometimes it's taking the time to look at your work and leave a comment, or just a like, or their congratulations, or commiseration or to mutually enthuse over something or a certain sculptor coming up to show me the green he's finished. The gift of someone's time and consideration is very valuable and even the smallest gestures can be really meaningful and uplifting.
  21. Guindyloo

    Getting to Know Each Other, October 2018

    I haven’t tried to cut back my paint purchases at all, honestly. I like having a lot of different options and then I mix a lot on top of that. I’m always finding new favourites and figuring out different uses for different paints. My only limitation is the apartment. I have a one bedroom and my paint desk is in the middle of the living room because that’s the only space I have so I have to make it work. If I had a dedicated hobby room, I’d gladly just add some more racks. I wouldn’t mind being entombed by paint. She does that while I’m looking. At least she doesn’t curl up right on top of the figure I’m painting. Yet.
  22. Guindyloo

    Getting to Know Each Other, October 2018

    Whew, that ended up being even more labour intensive than I thought it was going to be. I decided since so many of my paints were outside of the racks anyway that I might as well reorganise how I keep them. So that involved pretty much taking everything down from the main racks and then putting everything back up and at about 90% done I realized that I’d outgrown my racks entirely between all of the paints I took home from Reapercon and a couple of purchases since. Soooooo I ended up having to put most of the washes away in a pistol case to free up enough space. The good news is, doing that freed up so much space that now I have more space to buy more paints!
  23. Guindyloo

    01416: Sophie in Cat Costume

    Thanks all for the kind comments! A lot of the credit for that lovely face goes to Bob, he sculpted her so nicely!
  24. Guindyloo

    Getting to Know Each Other, October 2018

    Behold the chaos!
  25. Guindyloo

    Need advice on paints, matte or satin?

    The answer is, genuinely, use whatever you prefer. If you like the satin the most, use the satin. Now some people will tell you that's not the "right" answer and that's because traditionally, at the scale of most miniature figures (28-32mm) a matte finish looks more "correct" to the eye when painting metal or plastic figures to look organic. The satin, being more shiny than a matte finish, will give your figures more of an artificial look. For that reason, most of the paints aimed at miniature painting are formulated to be very matte. Reaper certainly is, I believe Army Painter is as well, and Vallejo is usually matte, though some of their paints can be on the satin side depending on what line they're from. On the other hand, GW and P3 paints can be a bit more on the satin side. You can certainly mix matte and satin paints, but there are 2 issues that you will come upon. 1. They may look a little different on the figure. 2. You may have difficulties achieving certain techniques, especially when it comes to blending. A matte paint may not like to layer or glaze over a satin finish and vice versa. One of the ways that you can sort of get around that would be to use paints with like finishes on different areas without mixing the two. So, for instance, satin finish paints only on the skin and matte finish paints only on the cloth. Then you can make a judgement call from there on how it looks to decide whether you want to bring both finishes to matte with a matte sealer, or even bring them both to a satin finish with a satin sealer. So you've got options as far as the paints that you've already purchased and like I said, they're your figures so you should use whatever finish you like. But, the general preference in the miniature painting world (and certainly speaking in competition terms) is generally a matte finish and since it's your intention to continue building a collection of Reaper paints, which are formulated to have a very matte finish, I think you would probably serve yourself best by purchasing craft paints with a matte finish where possible so they'll work a little better for you at filling in gaps in your paint collection.
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