SirLarpsAlot

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About SirLarpsAlot

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  1. Thing is, classes provide a structure for specific questions. "How is my blending on this section" is an easier jump because that's what you're learning in that class. Unless you're really working on something, solicitation of feedback tends to be generalized (in my experience) and if you're working on something specific, why not take a class on that subject? Classes can turn into social events. Depending on the class it can be kind of frustrating when it happens but it does and it's hard to avoid. The looser the structure, the more likely that is to happen. Thing is, you can get valuable feedback from the same people who sustain the social atmosphere, 50 feet away. And, as you point out, you can get it for "free." It's not really free, cuz it might require you to give something back. Maybe a little feedback on one of their pieces. Maybe a little community building. Maybe you'd have to loan some glue or snippers.
  2. I play keeper when I'm lucky enough to be playing soccer so penalty kicks are familiar to me. :)
  3. Penalty Kicks are always taken from the same spot. That spot is 12 yards away from the goal and in the center of the goal mouth. That's one of the things that's going to cause problems in this diorama. Putting the figures a realistic distance away is going to make them seem like they're playing two different games. Barca/Barcelona is the biggest name in soccer/football and is probably the most valuable sports franchise in the entire world. They play in the Spanish professional league.
  4. Nice clean paint job. You might consider putting a dark line between the leather straps and the skin. They're very similar in tone and the dark line would create some contrast between the two.
  5. Seems like you want an environment where you can solicit feedback constantly. Thing is, you don't necessarily need the teachers to do that. This board you're posting on is a pretty good place to get feedback, provided you're painting. I've gotten some good suggestions from posting here. I also have a few people I trust to give me really honest assessments of my work. I send them pictures via email and then they tell me exactly what they think (the base is too big, usually). ReaperCon is a great place to find people like this and it's the type of place where you can ask just about anyone for some advice. Last con I sat and painted for some time near a couple from Alaska. I asked them to look at the figure I was working on a couple of times and they had some great suggestions. There's a huge peer group of opinionated painters hanging out all over the con, why not just make use of them and then hit up painter's row when you've tapped that well? From experience, I find asking really specific questions of the instructors is a better use of one's time than saying "what do you think?" and showing them a mini you're working on. Specific questions are easier to handle and easier to address so you'll get a lot more feedback. "What do you think?" leads to answers like pushing contrast and smoothing out blending. When people ask me questions, I really like to know what they're trying to gain from the conversation. General feedback is hard. Specific feedback gives me something to focus on. That's the whole point of classes, imo. It's a focused period of time where a single technique or a specific group of techniques is being taught. An open period like a painting study hall sounds a lot more like a social event than anything where work would get done. And the thing is that ones ability to grasp a technique and apply it in their painting is generally predicated on how much time you've spent painting. If your brush control is shoddy, no amount of free hand classes are going to be able to make up for that.
  6. Things you could put on the field to spark interest: Detritus (a plastic bag, toilet paper, confetti, a water bottle over the touch line), scuff marks, different colors of grass based on mowing patterns, dirt/mud like you said, a goalie helmet (like petr chec used to wear).
  7. Love what you did around the eyes.
  8. It was totally Pegazus. My baaaaaaad! It was nice talking to the two of you. :)
  9. Yes, I do have you confused. Oops.
  10. If you could direct this person to our page on Facebook or just have them message one of us (Sendeth, me, or Skippen would be best) on here, that'd be great. If he wants an email, I can provide one. I think I had a brief interaction with this person but it's hard to tell. I had a lot of people come by and ask me about figure painting. My reaction to these people is pretty uniform. I would love to have this person come and sit with us and paint. We're usually a friendly group.
  11. It was good to meet you and your wife. Sorry I was so distracted. Would have loved to see the Arena figures. I think I know who this was. He wandered around the tables looking at the figures. I said hi, but was trying to pack up my stuff at the time. :(
  12. That's an impressive amount of color shift then. :)
  13. Thanks! Lidless, yeah, it's pretty but you're right on... the material is horrible!
  14. I can see you put quite a bit of effort into the eyes. Impressive for such a tiny face. I like the purple.
  15. NMM looks nice, especially for a first attempt.