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Gary Pryor

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About Gary Pryor

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  1. A spectral (not undead or skeletal but ghostly) dragon. Preferably at least partially transparent. More terrain. Especially set piece stuff. A huge cyclops skull with a giant tentacled eyeball monster. Mean looking gnomes in conical hats. Translucent spell effects. (wall of fire, ice zones, zombie hands from below, a giant meteor or falling star, Etc.) A bunch of constructs/metal golems for fodder like the lizard folk were this year, an obese mean looking priest (like in every fantasy anime) Gnomes/fairy/goblins/brownies/gremlins or other small folk riding mundane animals into battle. More fairy tale looking stuff in general Any kind of extra large forest animal with battle damage like sword hilts and arrows sticking out of it. Bird-Men What I don't need any more is semi-generic human sized guys with swords. Well I guess a few more couldn't hurt...
  2. Learning to paint with Bones Pt2

    I hate to think that the solution is buying more paints, but maybe I need something other then the Vallejo "dark flesh" color I have. I am priming with Vallejo "foundation white" Vallejo "black" or mix the two to get a grey; depending the brightness of what I'm working on. I have mostly been "priming" but putting on a thick solid coat with no water and a little bit of thinner. I think since I am brushing it on anyway I should probably start doing all the base coats of bright sections (like skin) with white, but I have a little difficulty making sure I have total coverage with white in the deep recesses. I already had one complete failure where I missed a spot of white base coat and when I used a paint thinned with water on an area I thought was primed it started beading up. In this batch I primed the Butcher and cook all white (except the items they are holding, which I primed black) the others were all solid black. Somehow the drinking dwarf looks way better then the blacksmith (who needed even though I used the same process on both, The same with the butcher looking a lot better then the cook, who I had to redo a ton until he didn't have bug eyes . Thanks for all the tips. I will keep practicing and reading or watching examples.
  3. Learning to paint with Bones Pt2

    "finished" a very plain Iron Golem yesterday, and did the townsfolk today. Looking for anything specific tips that might help me, as I am brand new to painting. Really struggling with skin tone today.
  4. Learning to paint with Bones Pt1

    Thanks for all the advice. I will try to look at it all again when I am not half asleep. Today I bought a set of cheap but very tiny synthetic brushes (with the hope of eliminating the toothpick) and one very small more expensive brush. I will look at some washes later when I can to see if they will get me a clearer idea of pigment vs water. What kinds of things can you do to bring out details in faces? washing and dry-brushing seems to be generally less effective on rounder surfaces for me. Or perhaps just the more subtle color contrast is not making them pop like other areas. Some of my paints seem a lot thinner then others straight out of the pots. On the advice of every source, I try to thin all my paints at least a little (even if they look like they don't need it) but then the paint just won't stick where I put it. This seems even more prevalent with lighter colors. The paint just seems to run into the recesses and refuse to live on the raised surfaces. After reading above maybe I am overloading my brush? I mostly rub my brush on the edge of the palate and/or on a piece of news-print or towel before touching the model. Then I seem to either get very little noticeable coverage and/or it running into the recesses. None of my metallic paints seem to have this issue. In a related note, I am going to try switching to a wet palate, but I am not sure a lot of my paints are thick enough to sit and stay on a piece of parchment paper. Related: I did an Iron Golem today and I am pretty happy with it even though I just brushed silver over black for the entire thing.
  5. Learning to paint with Bones Pt1

    I am teaching myself to paint to miniatures (via Bones III + Stoneskull + a few extras) and despite reading blogs and watching tutorial videos I feel like I am messing up some basic stuff. I started a couple of months ago trying to paint the base set from the newest bloodbowl edition*, then some incredibly difficult to pain Hero Forge custom miniatures (with the old porous and nigh impossible to paint material*). After getting a Bones III it has become my goal to learn how to paint well enough to not have a table full of unpainted figures at my gaming nights. So far major challenges have been: Human like faces (especially eyes), flesh colors, Bright colors (they look good wet but dry barely visible), recovering from accidentally coloring outside the lines, and controlling the flow of diluted paints. I have had mostly successes with: Metallics, dark solid colors, controlling the flow of very thick paint, being okay with the fact that everybody else's are going to look better then mine. The things I feel like I am doing wrong but am not sure about: how much pigment should be in a wash, ruining my brushes, using a hair-dryer because I don't want to wait in between colors/layers, not having the proper supplies. I have at my disposal: The Reaper MSP HD paint set#1 + reaper brand "new gold" + Vallejo brand: silver, bronze, red, indigo, green, blue, "dark flesh" "foundation white" medium thinner, and some blue based black. A hobby knife/clippers/emery board/cut proof pad for work-space A set of "craft brushes" that seem too large Toothpicks (for putting spots of paint) Blue Tac Included are pictures of several things I painted recently: Failures:Viking #105 & Hobgoblin Archer #236 (front & back) Success: Knight #107 & Were-O-Dile Lycanthrope #168 I can't help but feel there are some foundational steps or techniques I have completely overlooked. Please help me out by telling me if you have any tips.
  6. Super helpful thanks. Think I am getting DDS 1st, 2nd MAl' as well as pledging for Argent eventually. I may go broke but at least I will have many tiny plastic men to keep me company while living in the gutter. I think it could be really fun to put the Pathfinder on the table, then pull it off and tell my PCs that they have angered the mother and throw out DDS; then do the same thing with Mal' as a 3rd step in a later encounter. The hard part is not letting see the minis I am so excited about before hand.
  7. Didn't realize the one with the bow was also a hobgoblin... Going to have to paint her to match the rest now. Also good work.
  8. Bones Vernone, Ivy Crown Knight 77382

    I am new to painting but the one thing I have been very successful with is metallics. I made some pretty awesome looking "white" armor by dry brushing a little bit of silver over a white base coat. I imagine that doing the same with a clear reflective sealant of some kind could lead to something close to an enamel look.
  9. Exactly what I was looking for. Thank you.
  10. I just got a pathfinder red dragon, and while it is really cool, I need to get something bigger. How large is the " Dragon's don't share" dragon in comparison? I like the clockwork, skeletal, and multi-headed (which is clearly the largest) but I would like to start with a more standard dragon. So which of the regular dragons will cast the largest shadow at my game table?
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