ixminis

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About ixminis

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    Paint-Lackey
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    http://www.tinywars.com
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  • Location
    Denton, Tx (Home of Happiness)
  1. I found this with a search for "ambient sounds underwater" Underwater sounds
  2. Weekly paint club at 12 noon - 4 p.m. Saturdays at Reaper HQ. Occasionally there might be a field trip or a local gaming event might move the painting to a different area of the warehouse, but it's a fairly consistent thing! There are MANY willing and helpful people in attendance
  3. I'd also like to encourage you to avoid stripping *some* of your miniatures that you otherwise intend on stripping. It's a very useful tool / illustration to save a few of them as milestones of personal progress. They also give future instructors ideas about how to help you improve next as the collection will demonstrate trends in painting habits. Of course, budget and personal learning style can influence your choice about whether or not you really do this, but do consider it. Regards,
  4. White typically begets opacity, so you will lose the transparency effect you seem to be looking for. You might consider Reaper's Clear colors as well. All in all I'm going to speculate that you are going to be shifting the color if you go with an translucent paint. Perhaps focusing on recesses using darker colors (maybe similar to an inking techique) might work you towards the objective? As a footnote: The purpose I use the testor's for is the drying qualities and making colored strands for goo, blood, bile, etc.
  5. What Heisler said: questions@reapermini.com if I remember correctly
  6. I find that matteboard is a relatively sturdy background. There's also background paper available in neutral tones. The black backgrounds reaper uses work because the white space and black space diffuse into each other and create the equivalent of grey (it evens out). Digital cameras adjust the entire picture according to the majority of what the sensor sees. A neutral background ensures that the main subject (the miniature) is what mainly affects the cameras logic.... hopefully that makes sense. There are others that can say it in a much more technical manner, but do a test once you've got a few different backgrounds. Don't change any settings, just the background and you'll see what each background does to the image better.
  7. I wonder who else will get the reference. Nice stuff. Did you have any trouble getting the color in the photograph to work? If so, consider a neutral gray background. Again, nice.
  8. The size of the brush will impact how long you can keep the paint on the brush before applying the paint & how much paint will be available per dip in the paint. Depending on the climate you live and paint in, you'll prefer one over the other. My recommendation is to get used to the larger one as it will eventually mean less dips in the paint for you and more time on the mini
  9. Love Kev's VOID minis and you've made a nice sharp PJ for it. Niiice!
  10. Start with a neutral background such as Grey if you want a catch all. If you want to go with a colored background per image and not worry about having the same background let me know via this post and I'll look for my "background color vs mini color information. I'm mobile right now and don't remember net all the recommendations
  11. That ^^
  12. Having played Mr. Close's "Fiasco!" game last year, I can say that YOU DO NOT WANT TO MISS OUT ON IT!!! It's absolutely fantastic!!! and I'm the real Wayne Newton!
  13. Nice! You do know that outing ninjas = not good.
  14. Fantastic! That airbrush type is actually called triple action by Iwata. The dial on the front bottom of the airbrush is for an additional level of atomization of the overall paint and air mix. Larger drops, no problem, finer drops no problem as well!
  15. You do not need a $400 camera. Based on the picture, you are looking for a Macro setting. It looks like a tulip in most cameras. Some phones even have it now. It's not always on a button. Sometimes it's in the display and you use arrow keys and a select button to get to the option.