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Jordan Peacock

Bones Supporter
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Everything posted by Jordan Peacock

  1. Jordan Peacock

    Kaladrax's base

    Heh. I've made use of Kaladrax's BASE far more often than I've found a use for Kaladrax. :)
  2. Zetan: "Zrxzz *hiss* zglbl tr zxls zn zaxl'r *pbbt* zn'r!" (Translation: "Stupid EARTHLINGS! Their primitive attempt at a spaceship could never fly! Bah!") Reaper Bones plastic 32mm scale miniature #80044 "Flying Saucer" modified as a playground structure, with special guest appearance by the PVC promo figure "Zetan" from the Modiphius "Fallout: Wasteland Warfare" Two-Player Starter Kit (and assorted other bits in the background for decor). My intent here was to turn this tiny flying saucer from the Kickstarter into one of those "flying saucer" structures found on ruined playgrounds in the Fallout series of video games. Somehow, just having a single piece of playground equipment seemed rather lonely, so I made use of assorted bits of junk to add a couple of other playground features as well. The saucer is modified from the original model by taking a section of a small plastic disposable cup and cutting holes in it to serve as a "spacer" between the top and bottom portions of the saucer model. It just so happened that the lip of the cup fit neatly within the recessed area of the top of the saucer. The BOTTOM of the cup (where I cut it off at an arbitrary height) didn't fit quite so neatly at all into the recess at the bottom, so I had to glue it in place there and reinforce it with some epoxy putty. (I could have perhaps MADE it fit by making the "spacer" section taller, as the diameter of the cup of course narrowed as it got closer to the bottom, but then it would have been a very TALL saucer that would have looked more like some bizarre giant lantern rather than being, well, saucer-like. I'm already pushing it as it is.) I used a hobby knife to remove the alien pilot (I may find a more formidable war machine for him to pilot later on), and replaced the spidery little legs with some big pieces of mat board. The slide is made from more mat board, scored and bent to make a slight curve, with epoxy putty as gap-filler. I left the top portion removable so a figure could be put inside (for whatever reason). While I was at it, I imagined that thanks to that dome up top, the saucer might actually provide SOME sort of shelter against the elements, so someone might have used it to store a little supply cache. I put in a few assorted items (can of "Greasy Prospector" Pork & Beans, backpack, bottle of Nuka Quantum, a "Blast Radius" board game, and a couple of issues of "Astoundingly Awesome Tales"), and had one can that's rolled down the slide (perhaps empty, and just trash ... though, come to think of it, the playground could probably stand to have a little more litter here and there, given how trashy everything is in Fallout 4). For another feature, I made a merry-go-round out of a spare "sewer cover" from a TMNT play set (the same one I turned into the Wok-a-Doodle street scene earlier), some paper clips for the supports/handles, and the cap from an empty super-glue container as the centerpiece (that, painted, maybe if you squint at it looks at least a LITTLE like a red rocket ready to blast off). Then, a see-saw, made from a craft "popsicle stick" teetering on a plastic hinge piece cut off from the aforementioned TMNT play-set sewer manhole cover (as in the original toy the cover had a "breakaway feature" where you'd hit a button and any figure standing on it would be dropped into the "sewer" area below). I pasted some pictures of retro rockets (I think they might be El Gato designs?) and then tried some freehand work to make some of those "asterisk" stars, a ringed planet, and a crescent moon, to continue the space theme. If only I had some small springs and little rocket ships as bouncy-riders to put somewhere on the playground! (Maybe I'll add more features later.) I had a mind to add a boundary fence, but I'm not sure how to do that in a way that won't be flimsy and prone to easy breakage. "Mars Attacks!" terrain sets from Mantic include a nice little plastic picket fence section, but I'd need a score of those to surround the playground (and there's only one per set), so that's not even remotely cost-effective. Storing this thing is already going to pose a challenge, even without the fencing. Right now, I've got the pieces glued down on the "playground" board, but I may have to go back and remove them and give them their own bases, so I can store the individual pieces in some foam-lined containers and maybe extend their usable lifespan a bit before I have to do major repairs. The house in the background is a Bachmann Plasticville O-scale "Ranch House," assembled and put on a mat board base, painted up in acrylics and partially furnished. In the background, the ground continues with some Secret Weapon Miniatures "Tablescapes" terrain boards ("Scrap Yard" theme).
  3. Swing set, bouncy rides, jungle gym ... I can think of a whole host of things to add. I just figured 3 was good for now. In order to carry on the "SPACE!" theme for the playground, one idea I had for a swing set was to make the "A" frame a couple of cut-out rocket-ship shapes (and paste printed rocket-ship images on each side, with some wear-and-tear distress). I've got some thin jewelry chain that should work well for the swings -- and at least one should be broken. For a jungle gym, I was thinking of trying to somehow make a wire frame that's in the shape of a rocket ship or something else "spacey." Or maybe I could do something with plastic sprues rather than wire? Or maybe a combination of plastic sprues AND wire, with holes drilled through the sprues, and wire going through, so that way I've got my connections. The big challenge would be how to hold it all together without it falling apart like a house of cards every time it's handled. Also at some point I wanted to have a little bit to the side with a drinking fountain, waste can, and a park bench. At that point, though, I'm going to have to make each addition its own stand-alone item, as it's going to get crowded.
  4. Sorry, I don't know what's up. I just tried viewing this page in Firefox, Chrome, and Microsoft Edge, and it showed up in each one.
  5. Jordan Peacock

    Dave Graffam East Gate - plus

    Sweet! I've often pondered picking up some of those GreenStuffWorld texture rollers (I always freeze up over the issue of ... WHICH ONES?!?) but I always thought of them in the context of basing and floor tiles -- I didn't even think of WALL textures. That looks pretty nice!
  6. Jordan Peacock

    Nuka-Girl (50227)

    For a silly Fallout-inspired Savage Worlds RPG scenario or two that I'm running at Necronomicon, I've put together a "Rooby-Doo" gang (basically Scooby-Doo characters with the "serial numbers clumsily filed off" and some half-hearted attempt to fit them into the Fallout universe). One twist is that since the "Rooby Gang" only has 5 members, and the gaming department at Necronomicon prefers RPG scenarios that can seat SIX players, I introduced the idea of a "Mystery Special Guest Star" character that would use a basic template, but the player could pick some actor or fictitious character, mangle the name a bit, plug in a couple of Edges to represent the character's strengths, and run with it. Initially I saw this as an opportunity for someone to do a bad Elvis or Arnold Schwarzenegger impression, but I got the idea of how it'd be fun to have a bunch of in-universe fictitious characters to choose from -- much how Batman and Robin could show up in a Scooby cartoon just as easily as Mama Cass or Don Knotts. I've been converting a few (mostly Chronoscope) minis to represent members of the Unstoppables, I've already got a decent "Captain Cosmos," I'm working on a Jangles the Moon-Monkey ... and here we have Nuka Girl. Now, this differs noticeably from the official Nuka Girl in that this outfit is a little bit more spaceworthy than Nuka-Girl's pinup outfit (i.e., no bare midriff, no cleavage), but I wasn't about to do major surgery to the "Dee-Dee, Astro Girl" (#50227) model to push things in that direction. I suppose this could very well be just someone who's wearing a Fallout-universe spacesuit that happens to be styled after Nuka Girl (just as it's quite possible to run around in Fallout 4 dressed as the Silver Shroud, the Mechanist, or Grognak the Barbarian). The main element I was missing, however, would be the bubble helmet. For that, it just so happens that a local store (Cool Stuff Games) has quite a few HeroClix I can get as singles, and those included S.H.I.E.L.D. Agent #011 and Nick Fury #017 from the "Avengers Infinity" set. Both minis are essentially the same, save for a head swap, and both feature a clear plastic bubble-top helmet that can be easily popped off. I bought several of them since it was a far cheaper source of bubble-helmets than anywhere else I know of (especially since it was local, so I didn't have to mess with shipping & handling). It's by no means a perfect fit for Dee-Dee/Nuka-Girl, but at least it DOES fit over her head. I didn't bother trying to mess with the joint collar, since that would've been an entirely new ordeal; the Dee-Dee mini already has a thick "helmet collar" that almost fills out the open space at the bottom of the bubble-dome helmet, so I figure it's "good enough for tabletop."
  7. Jordan Peacock

    CIRCUS: Acrobat, Lady Tiger, Super Villain (50169)

    I love the mini (all those rosettes!), but the backstory and scene are what really knock it out of the park! :D Amazing!
  8. Jordan Peacock

    Nuka-Girl (50227)

    Just recently, I painted up the Nuka-Girl mini from Modiphius from "Fallout: Wasteland Warfare," and it so happened that while I was organizing foam-trays to hold new minis, I found (trumpet fanfare!) my original Nuka-Girl proxy! (I'd misplaced my "Betty, Space Heroine" Nuka-Girl some time ago, which was why I started over again with "Dee-Dee, Astro Girl.") From left to right: * Reaper Chronoscope #50150, "Betty, Space Heroine." * Reaper Chronoscope #50227, "Dee-Dee, Astro Girl." * Modiphius (Fallout: Wasteland Warfare) "Nuka-Girl" promo resin figure.
  9. I've got 8 or 9 of these old Ral Partha 25mm scale Shadowrun "Lone Wolf" (20-581) sets, circa 1996, which I once picked up with the intent of painting up for a "biker gang" for post-apocalyptic settings. I half had a mind to somehow "remove" the rider so I'd have some cool bikes that I could replace with a variety of drivers, but it (too late) became evident to me that would be a much harder project than I originally envisioned. Much, much later, I dug the bikes back out with the interest in seeing how they might stack up against ~20mm toy cars used for Gaslands, as I'd seen someone posing some Shadowrun bikers next to their 1:64 scale cars and they looked pretty nice. The trouble, I realize, is that some Gaslanders have been using GENUINELY 1:64 cars, which are actually larger than the typical Hot Wheels toy (and, not surprisingly, tend to cost much more, too). Nonetheless, it might be close enough for me to get away with it ... until someone else puts some "Sons of Anarchy" bikes on the table and these guys dwarf them. The "conversion" aspect here is that I used some brown-stuff putty to add a bandoleer on the riding version of the model (for some reason he is only cast as having one when standing), and for both versions I added a pip-boy on the left wrist. The figure is painted up in both cases as wearing a blue Vault Suit, but over that is a long-coat inspired by one of the designs the Courier might end up with as a prize at the end of the "Lonesome Road" DLC. (Other designs include the Bull of the Legion, or the Bear of the NCR, if you aligned with either of those factions. The "21" -- a reference to Vault 21 in New Vegas, I suppose -- is apparently the design if you decide either to side with Mr. House, or to fight for a "free" Vegas.) I decided to go with the "Fallout" theme primarily because the bike has a strong resemblance to the "Lone Wanderer" bike from Fallout 4, but also because I couldn't help but draw a mental comparison between the "Lone Wolf" name of the model and the "Lone Wanderer" name of the bike. (If only it could be driven around in Fallout 4! And if only there were a large enough sandbox world full of dusty roads to drive it down. ;) ) One weird quirk about the model bike is that it has really FAT wheels, such that it can pretty much stand on its own -- not that WELL, alas, as it knocks over pretty easily, but it's still possible.
  10. Okay, sad to say, I didn't actually paint these up all glittery. I'll have to make up for that with some other "wolf" to paint up. The problem here was that these bike models really didn't give me much of an open space to work with a "rainbow" gradient without it being horribly broken up by all the greebles and such. So, I just went with painting everything a basic rust, then splotching on different colors for each bike. (I suppose if you put them all together, you'd have something of a rainbow of color, but a very muted color, punctuated by dark brown and orange RUST ... and not a bit of glitter.) I put these figures on some Secret Weapon Miniatures "Town Square" themed bike bases, and freehand-painted the backs of their long-coats with an abstract rendition of the logo of the "Great Khans" from Fallout: New Vegas. Although the Khans in the Fallout franchise have nothing to do with bikes, per se, their look struck me as very much "biker gang," and lacking any better faction to tie a post-apocalyptic biker gang with, I went with them. (Besides, the big-mustachioed look of these guys seems to fit.) In the background are a few O-scale Bachmann "Plasticville" grocery store facades that I combined in an attempt to make one BIG supermarket facade, with some papercraft grocery aisle shelves inside. For terrain tiles, I used the Secret Weapon Miniatures "Urban Streets" theme from Tablescapes.
  11. Some friends of mine are starting up a Gaslands league. My ability to participate is in doubt, due to my crazy work schedule (any given week, I may rather belatedly learn that it's time for me to find a hotel and schedule a flight for NEXT WEEK somewhere, and goodbye to weekend plans) but I've still found the time to dig up a few Hot Wheels and turn them into post-apocalyptic monsters. I already had plenty of messed-up old Matchbox, Hot Wheels and other-branded cars of this general size corroding away in my garage, but I've been on a "Fallout" kick, so I wanted some vehicles that could potentially look as if they'd come from the Fallout wastelands. Toward that end, I went shopping. (So far: Cheapest deal I found was 69 cents per blister pack in a "Special Purchase" bin at my local Home Depot -- cheaper than Walmart, Big Lots, or the Dollar Tree.) I've got several cars in progress, but I wanted to at the least meet the minimum requirement to participate in the first game, should my schedule cooperate. (The first game is supposed to have 50-can teams, with no sponsors, with the idea being that the players can jockey for sponsors based on placing in the first game ... or something like that. I'm not exactly clear on how it's going to go.) So, I went with a minimum-size car/truck team (well, I suppose I COULD have built a war-rig) of 2 vehicles: a Hot Wheels '52 Chevy Pickup that I've dubbed "Red Rocket," and a Maisto Leadfoot that I've dubbed ... "Leadfoot." (It seemed a nice enough name already.) I used epoxy putty and some Instant Mold so I could texture-stamp strips of putty to make quickie "armor plates" to cut and glue onto vehicles, in addition to whatever random bits I had available. In Gaslands terms: > "Red Rocket" (25 pts): Middleweight truck (15 pts) + Ram (4 pts) + Rocket Launcher (6 pts). Rocket Launcher is shown with forward facing, but I could optionally detach and reattach it for a backward-facing ANTI-TAILGATING MEASURE. (Hee!) > "Leadfoot" (25 pts): Middleweight car (12 pts) + HMG turret (4 pts x3 for turret = 12 pts) + Grenades (1 pt). That should be just enough to allow me a spot at the table. Eventually I hope to kitbash some scale-appropriate bikes and buggies, and to try my hand at a war-rig, though I don't know what the points parameters will be for future games, so for now I'm basing it all around the typical 50-can (50 pt) model. I suppose if I were really serious, I could try mounting tiny magnets on the vehicles and building an armory of swap-out weaponry, but ... eh, I've got way too many other projects vying for my time for that. ;)
  12. Jordan Peacock

    Gaslands: Red Rocket and Leadfoot

    Well, I suppose I could always just keep some spare Tablescapes tiles at the ready, and if we NEED the expansion, I can put an extra tile on to handle the vehicle that wandered off. Each tile is 12" x 12", and I can't see much tactical advantage in staying further than 12" away from the central train objective. The main reason I had for considering that little caveat is that I worry about situations where Slides and Wipeouts might position a car in such a way that it has no choice but to cross the table edge. If the cars are all converging upon the goal in the *center*, perhaps that just won't be a common case, and I'm over-thinking it, but it was just a little compromise I could live with (i.e., your car might be pointing toward the edge, but put a Hard turn in there, suffer the Hazard points, and you can be back in play). However, it occurs to me that there COULD be a problem if someone plays a War Rig. For most vehicles, when you move your vehicle, you put the template down in front of it (or behind, if you're in Gear 1 and going into Reverse), then you pick up the toy and reposition it at the other end of the template. (This method of movement can lead to some oddities in the system: Longer vehicles effectively GO FASTER, but have a harder time making TIGHT TURNS.) So, it would be possible to, if your car were angled pointing off to the side of the board, to place a curve template that would bring you right back in, and the car toy itself would never actually be placed off the board. The trouble with the War Rig, however, is that you drag and slide the trailer along the path of the template to the best of your ability. (The template is placed at the front of the cab, and it's the BACK of the cab that's then moved to the front of the template -- so, again, a longer cab means a faster vehicle, in that consequential weirdness.) If, however, that path were dangling off the edge of the Tablescapes tiles, it'd be much harder to execute that. So either I'd have to say, "Except for War Rigs," or just skip that rule entirely. For the sake of simplicity, I might as well leave it out. (If I playtest and it becomes an ACTUAL ISSUE, however, I might revisit it.) I've been thinking of -- for this scenario -- changing the rule for Slide when applied to a straight template that instead of it becoming a 90 degree hard right or left, it instead becomes a *random* spin (up to but not exceeding 90 degrees in either direction). Toward that end, I need to fix up a "scatter direction" die. (I.e., arrows on each side.) Since most of the action is going to be running in a parallel stretch, being forced to go *hard 90 degrees* left or right from that point is going to have some severe consequences, and that comes up pretty often with Handling dice. I think I'll test it WITHOUT that first, though. If I can get it to work as well as possible WITHOUT mangling the rules horribly, all the better.
  13. Jordan Peacock

    Gaslands: Red Rocket and Leadfoot

    For the last game in our "escalation league" of Gaslands, we went with a straightforward "Death Arena" -- "last car driving." The play area was littered with lots of terrain, including Reaper Shipping Containers (some painted by me, some painted by Dr Rhubarb), and I had my "Atomic 66 Cafe" on my side of the table, just for fun. For my 80-point force, I brought good ol' Leadfoot back into action, though this time the roof-mounted gun was downgraded to forward-facing only. (It costs 3x the basic weapon cost to make it a fully-operational turret.) That might have been a real point-saver, but it makes SUCH A BIG DIFFERENCE, it's scary: it's pretty tough to line up the front of the vehicle JUST so, to get other cars within the forward firing line (it's not really an "arc" at all), when everyone is going every-which way. I did at least give it some Grenades and Rapid Fire. (Rapid Fire seems like a no-brainer choice if you're playing Rutherford, since it basically takes the best weapon on your vehicle, then gives you another for free.) The bulk of my points were sunk into the APC, the "Battle Bus." It was set up with SMG (which benefited from the APC "blitz" rule, such that if one crewmember had it, all 6 had it), Rapid Fire, and a maximized turret-mounted mini-gun. The APC "Battle Bus" rules are pretty crazy. Right from the get-go, the player to my left sent a monster truck with over 40 points sunk into it toward my car and APC. It fired off a couple of shots, scoring a few dings on my vehicles, but once the APC got close enough to get within Medium range (range for "hand weapons" from crew members), then the minigun (x2 thanks to Rapid Fire) and 5 shots with SMGs (3d6 each) shredded it in short order. (I've been told that the APC has been "retired" in beta drafts of version 2.0 of the Gaslands rules. I'm not terribly surprised. That was just a bit TOO effective.) I really liked some of the conversions on the table. (I mean, some were just raw Hot Wheels cars or "Sons of Anarchy" plastic bikes, but all of Dr_Rhubarb's cars were converted and painted. The green car on the left had some pretty nice modifications: some serrated fins on the sides (side-mounted rams), headlight-mounted forward-facing guns, window bars, and ridiculously over-sized exhaust (tied in with the car having smoke-screen as one of its major defenses). The car on the right is one that Dr_Rhubarb has been working on at his worktable for a while: originally, all the shiny metallic details were plain "chrome" finish, but he used a Vallejo wash that (unlike my own acrylic "washes") was actually translucent, and transformed the formerly silvery surface into a really rich brassy look. As I understand it, he's going for a "brushed nickel" look for the grey parts of the shell, but it's not quite done yet. The whole battle only lasted 2 rounds ... but of course, 2 rounds can still take quite a while to play out. By the time we ended, the sun was starting to come in at a nicely dramatic angle through the window. My APC, after its initial shredding stunt, rightly became the focused target of the others for elimination -- but it managed to take out a bike, a second turret, and another battle-car before wiping out rather dramatically (crashing into a barricade, flipping over it, then crashing into a turret as it exploded, taking out the turret in the process). What can I say? I'm a big fan of destructible terrain. :) Somehow, it came down to just my Leadfoot and Dr_Rhubarb's deadly "Double Doom" (with turret-mounted laser), and after getting pegged again by the laser, Leadfoot only had two hull points left. Its only hope was to accelerate forward and to try to blast away at Double-Doom with its forward guns -- which it did -- but nothing decisive. Past that point, it looked as if it was a done deal and that we were merely delaying the inevitable, because now all Double-Doom had to do was to leisurely circle back around, playing "keep-away" (so long as it stayed outside of handgun-and-grenade range) and plugging away with its laser as it went. The crazy thing was, somehow Leadfoot kept EVADING damage from the laser (roll 3d6 for handling, and negate a damage point only on the roll of a 6 on a die). To my surprise, when it came time for Double-Doom to make a hard left turn to bank back and begin its deadly reverse strafing run ... somehow the maneuver dice came up as a jumble of Slide/Spin/Hazard, and even taking a Hazard point in order to reroll made it hardly any better. Double-Doom wiped out, flipped, and -- surprise! It only had 2 hull points left by that point as well, and that's exactly how much damage it took from rolling over and crashing into the barricades. Somehow, Leadfoot was the victor. Whoo! I still had to take a couple of "drama shots" of Double-Doom, as it had been quite the effective battle-car, and I liked the overall look and weathering effects. (Plus, I've got some of my barrier "decals" in the background applied to the AT-43 barricades. The numbers are intended for use in identifying gates, but for this game they were just put about randomly.) From this point on, Dr Rhubarb is planning to still run some Gaslands games, but instead of doing an "escalation," it'll just be a matter of agreeing upon a scenario and points for the next game. (There were a couple of people who had expressed interest, but had missed the first game, then seemed to get the idea that they "couldn't" come after that, since they'd "missed too much.") Our next plan is to do a 75-point "monster jam" loosely inspired by the "zombie run" with some tweaks to try to address perceived shortcomings in that scenario -- each team fields a monster truck, and CAN field additional support vehicles, but they're restricted to being lightweight. Instead of zombies, we get wrecked car hulls to crush for points -- but of course only the monster truck can do that, not the "support" vehicles. (The idea here was a concern that if we did a "zombie run," someone could dominate by just fielding a "zerg rush" of bikes to spread out and hit as many zombies as possible -- whether you're driving a golf cart or a semi rig with a ram on the front, it makes no difference to how effective you are at taking out zombies, but fielding twice or three times as many vehicles as everyone else most certainly WOULD make a difference.) I have a rough idea for a scenario still forming in my head, though I'm trying to work out how it would work, exactly: "Thunder Railroad." It's loosely inspired by the old Milton Bradley "Thunder Road" board game. I'd use 6-8 Tablescapes terrain boards (3x2 or 4x2 arrangement) to represent a wasteland landscape, with a rail running down the middle, and a "robot" train chugging along. Teams would play groups of scavengers/raiders trying to vie for precious supplies on the robo-train, braving its automated turrets and each other to get close enough to snatch goods off of it. Everyone would start at Gear 6 from the get-go, as would the train -- except that the train would be using a shorter movement profile than is normally permissible in Gear 6, it never rolls maneuver dice, never generates hazards, and -- aside from its turrets -- it's essentially indestructible. When the train would reach far enough across the board, we'd remove the 2 furthest-back boards, and all vehicles presently on those boards would be out of play. (Any loot they'd scored would still count toward that team's final points, as presumably they got away with it.) Those boards would then be recycled and put at the FRONT of the line (sliding the rest back) just like the old Thunder Road, so we'd essentially have a constantly "rolling" terrain effect. (Kind of like watching characters running against repeating scenery in a Hannah-Barbara cartoon. ;) ) I still would have a lot of little details to work out. Normally "illegal" maneuvers might actually be legal, but at a significant penalty. Moving "off" the board would only be allowed if the template you're using would still have your car end up still ON the board at the end of movement. (So if you're facing toward the edge of the board, you could take a Turn or Gentle template that would temporarily take you over the edge, as long as it curved back to plop you back into the play area at the end of the template.) Acquiring loot would consist of getting within X distance of the train platform (half an inch?) and basically staying there long enough to load up. I'm thinking of having cargo capacity limits: something like, take the original Crew rating of any vehicle, and that's the base Cargo capacity, and you could voluntarily REDUCE the Crew of your vehicle in order to free up more Cargo space. (Consequently, using the option to ADD more crew would cut into your cargo capacity.) Wiping out would be catastrophic. Perhaps TOO catastrophic? I think that instead of following the usual rule of letting the person to your left decide what direction you face (being turned COMPLETELY around could pretty much take you out of the action), perhaps I should use scatter dice instead. One thing I'm not sure about: What if someone goes too far ahead? That wasn't an issue in Thunder Road, simply because if ANYBODY reached the forward board, everything would "roll back." But now it's the train that's serving as the pace-setter. Punishing someone for getting *too far ahead* of the train doesn't seem quite right. Maybe for the sake of abstraction, you simply CANNOT go "too far," and any movement that would take you off the forward end of the board is just cut off at that point. (You tap the brakes a bit so you don't lose sight of the train?) Anyway, it's very rough, and I may have to try "play-testing" it before I have anybody else try it out. (I also need to get a suitable "retro-futuristic" train model and some appropriate-gauge tracks, and some sort of tokens to represent the "loot.") Should be fun, though. :)
  14. Hmm. I've got a whole pack of "Lone Wolves" to paint up, that and I've been puzzling over what color to paint each one (can't ALL be cherry red, or that'd be dull). Suddenly I've got this crazy idea to paint one in rainbow glitter paint (I hardly ever use the stuff -- I wonder if it's still any good?) and dub it the "Lone Glitter Wolf" or the "Glitter Lone Wolf." Not that anybody who sees it is going to get the joke, but it'd definitely be *different*. :)
  15. Reaper Miniatures #80034 "Weapons Locker" -- plastic terrain piece (variable scale, used here for 32mm) -- painted up as a RobCo-labeled storage unit, as a barricade or objective for Fallout-themed post-apocalyptic games. The original model is hollow (and is fashioned in such a way that it probably wouldn't be that difficult to cut the lid open), but I just sealed up the bottom with a piece of mat board and decided to paint it up whole ... this time. (Now that I've painted the one, I'm thinking the next time I have an opportunity to grab one on sale, I may grab a couple more, and open up at least one and fill it with robo-junk.) I painted the whole thing dark brown as a base, then spackled it with Burnt Sienna, Pumpkin Orange, and King's Gold for rust effects initially. However, an entire container that's JUST rusty is kind of dull. I mean, it looked sort of okay, but there wasn't so much as a hint of paint peeling off, and that just didn't feel right. So, I went back and spackled it AGAIN with Graphite Gray and Moss Green (for deteriorating paint). I thought to myself that what it REALLY could use would be some sort of logo. At first I was thinking of a military logo, but I wasn't quite sure if the structure was plausible as military. So, I decided to go through a few different fictitious logos and see what I might be able to paint on it free-hand (this "corrugated" surface wouldn't lend itself to my printed paper "label" shortcuts -- and, besides, that'd undo all my effort on the "rust" look). In the end, I roughed out a RobCo logo (Dolphin Gray), then added some grunge (washed Graphite Gray and whatever was scraped up from the bottom of the paintbrush water cup). Voila! Grungy container with barely legible logo on it.
  16. Jordan Peacock

    80034 Weapons Locker (for scatter terrain)

    That sounds awesome (and I'll have to look into this), but it sounds slightly backwards, unless I misunderstand what the chipping medium *does*. Wouldn't you paint the rust FIRST, then paint the "original color" OVER that? The idea of the effect should suggest that the paint color is flaking away, and areas of metal that have been exposed underneath have turned rusty, so if the end effect has any depth at all, I'd expect the rust to go underneath. Actually, thinking about this, I figure there ought to be some reviews or techniques out there, so I did a Google search. I found a review here: http://tibbsforge.com/vallejo-chipping-medium/ I may just have to try this. Thanks for the pointer! :)
  17. I've been getting around to the terrain pieces (such as the Shipping Containers and Weapons Lockers) from Reaper Bones, and this is the latest: #80053, "Starship Generator." I figure this would be of particular use as a scenario objective for games of "Fallout: Wasteland Warfare" (which I've recently gotten started in -- somewhat delayed because of the difficulty of actually GETTING the game and figures in my area). My first approach would've been to make this thing all rusty like I've done with most of my other scenery as of late, but then I got the thought that this is a functional piece of equipment that someone might actually care to *maintain*, even though it might still be rather weathered and ancient. I also wanted something of a retro look, so instead of painting it up in "iPhone white" color scheme such as I did with my first Starship Generator, I thought I'd either go for construction yellow, robin's-egg blue, or leaf green (with the latter two colors chosen because I thought they might be more likely to evoke the sense of a "household appliance"). In the end, I went with robin's-egg (or something in that general neighborhood). Instead of covering it with rust patches, I applied some messy washes of graphite gray (for grime) and dry-brushed with (light) dolphin gray (for a look of wear). The model already has some cables that look as if they're bodged-on, perhaps bypassing some fried internal system (no doubt some sort of SAFETY mechanism that fused!), as it looks a bit odd to have a device that looks as nicely shielded and sealed as this does having cables that pop out of a grill and then route around to another part of the same machine. (That to me says, "cable patch.") I grunged up the cables as well, and then painted in an indicator needle on the reverse side. (I don't think the detail on that side was intended to be any sort of display or meter, but it just looked as good a place as any to put some more primitive sort of indicator on the device, since, despite the model's original name, I have no intention of this ever going on a starship.) It's a bit grimy, grungy, and not worth a "showcase" post, but I just haven't seen too many (or any, for that matter) instances of the Starship Generator getting painted up, and it strikes me as a useful piece that fills an important niche as a catch-all "gizmo" that could be either an objective, or some terrain to hide behind, or a bit of "battlefield feature" that could, say, blow up if you hit it with too many plasma blasts.
  18. This started with me shopping for some "miniatures" to use with Gaslands -- or, that is, some Hot Wheels cars, ostensibly in "1:64" scale, and often cited as being around 20mm scale. The thing is, scale is awfully squishy when it comes to toys, and especially for the Matchbox/Hot Wheels world of toy cars, when you have buses, vans, construction vehicles, semi rigs, airplanes, helicopters, sports cars, VW bugs, motorcycles, carts, etc., essentially the SAME SIZE. I've sometimes used Hot Wheels motorcycles for use with Chronoscope figures (roughly 32mm scale) because of that "scale-squish" -- and whether or not they're truly the right scale, they "look okay." My hope upon seeing this vehicle was that I'd be in the same boat for using this as some sort of personal high-tech flying conveyance for a cyberpunk campaign. Well, my first mistake was that I didn't scrutinize the interior nearly well enough: it's not a one-seater, but rather a two-seater. (In my defense, it was kind of hard to make out the details with all that weird chrome going on, while the toy was still in the blister package.) The other was that I probably should have actually brought a mini with me (or some sort of measurement proxy) before supposing that this would really be big enough for 32mm. Next to a Gaslands car, this thing looks "too big," but the SEATS inside look closer to 20mm. The top of the toy is die-cast, while the rest is plastic. (Why just the one part is die-cast metal, instead of just EVERYTHING being plastic, I don't know, really.) Some of the newer Hot Wheels can be disassembled fairly easily if the part that holds everything together happens to be plastic -- since that means I can drill out the "rivet" (not sure what to call it) on bottom easily. The metal takes a bit more work, but once done, the whole thing comes apart. (Why would I want to do this? Well, I want to base-coat everything, but I don't want to paint over that clear windshield. Also, it's a lot easier to paint the interior this way.) I happened to be working on Reaper Bones #80054 "Starship Terminal" at the same time, which I was painting up in a scheme of grey (with darker grey details, white highlights, and "glowing" blue accents), and the similarity of the blue with the cockpit made me consider doing up the Sky-Fi vehicle in the same scheme. After reassembling, I did some more touch-up work and highlights. (Ditto for the Starship Terminal.) I like the look. I just wish I could magically enlarge the copter a bit so it might look like Sarah Blitzer could actually fit in the seat. (The regular IMEF troopers would have an even worse time of it, I figure.) Just another view of the Sky-Fi that shows the scale disparity even more clearly. :/ Eh. Maybe I could get away with sticking it on the edge of a cyberpunk tabletop scene, and as long as nobody gets too close to it, maybe the players won't notice the scale issue. (I mean, several of my buildings and whatnot on the table have some pretty "squishy" scales or else I couldn't hope to put everything on the table.)
  19. Jordan Peacock

    Sky-Fi Cyberpunk Flier (Hot Wheels)

    Huh. Good thought! Maybe the dollar stores and "Big Lots" type stores have *last year's* collection of Hot Wheels, etc. It's a shot in the dark, but I guess I could stop by a few and see if I get lucky. (Most of my Hot-Wheels hunting -- for Gaslands -- has been elsewhere, because I know the baseline cost for a Hot Wheels car is $1 or less. The best deal I got was 69 cents shortly before Christmas at Home Depot, which had a "special shipment" deal that was soon picked over -- I just happened to get some because I was in there getting some parts for home repairs. A friend of mine found some 59-cent Hot Wheels at a local Target. But a DOLLAR store? In no way do I expect to find anything CHEAPER than what I just mentioned THERE. ;D )
  20. Jordan Peacock

    Sky-Fi Cyberpunk Flier (Hot Wheels)

    I just wish I could still find them at Walmart. They're from the 2017 series of Hot Wheels, near as I can tell. I think the one I found (I looked for others, in vain) was just a chance older model that was somehow mixed in with the more recent ones. Froggy the Great managed to work one into one of his Gaslands motorized monstrosities. :) The die cast part by itself would make a great unmanned drone piece (one that might work with 32mm), if only I sawed off the tall vertical shaft that is attached to it and which runs through the whole of the piece from top to bottom. (It's the part I have to Dremel-grind at on the bottom in order to disassemble the whole thing.) I love the idea of the flying brain-drone, for a wilder sort of "late night show B-movie" sort of sci-fi setting, but I could also envision maybe just removing the cockpit insert area (some cutting would be required) and turning it into a one-seater that might accommodate some of my older-school 25mm Ral Partha Shadowrun minis. (Okay, even back then, they were pushing into the 28mm range, but were still noticeably smaller than today's Chronoscope minis, which I would classify as more in the range of 32mm or even pushing 34mm.) Hmm. Actually, I should put this thing next to some of my old "Doom: the Board Game" minis. Those were what I once upon a time would have qualified as "true" 25mm. (As in "25mm represents 6 feet." Pretty close to 1:72.) As it so happens, the infamous "Bag o' Zombies" (Twilight Creations) is also extreme 25mm: that is, right around 25mm from the bottom of the zombie's feet to the top of the zombie's head, so maybe I should put them next to the copter as well, and perhaps I'm on to a suitable vehicle for some sort of cyberpunk demonzombiepocalyptic setting. ;) (On a scale tangent, I still can't figure out why Hot Wheels are deemed both "1:64" and "20mm scale," when "1:72" is deemed "25mm scale." I can only assume that these do NOT represent the same set of criteria being used. And, yeah, I know, scale is a messy issue when miniatures are concerned. ;) Even more so with TOYS.)
  21. Jordan Peacock

    Sky-Fi Cyberpunk Flier (Hot Wheels)

    I LOVE that idea! I actually have a brain-in-a-jar on my shelf o' shame. Hmmmmmm.
  22. Jordan Peacock

    80034 Weapons Locker (for scatter terrain)

    Thanks! One thing I've got to do one of these days is to figure out how to do REAL peeling paint. It's the sort of thing I can occasionally do by accident, but never on demand. I know there's some kind of method that involves first painting a model all rusty-looking, then putting some salt (?) grains on it, spray-on hair fixative, then spray-painting it some outer color, and then deliberately breaking the resulting area where the paint is bulged out by the salt grains, or something like that. I also remember a long time ago, in the fabric store I could get "crackle paint" medium: it was a brush-on "paint" that was sold in the same section as the craft acrylics, and the idea was that you'd paint it whatever color you wanted to show through the cracks, then paint a layer of this clear "crackle paint" medium over that, and then when that dried, paint an outer layer of paint over THAT, and when that dried, it should shrink and crackle, I guess because the medium did something to the surface that messed with the outer paint. I actually had some, but it was the sort of thing best used for LARGE and fairly flat areas (not useful on the scale of a single typical miniature, or even small terrain pieces), but I wonder if it would have worked for something as large and solid as the Weapons Locker or Shipping Container. I suppose if I were really determined, I could paint SEVERAL layers of acrylic over a flat surface, then deliberately distress it, and if the acrylic was applied thickly enough, I'd probably end up with a layer sturdy enough to be peeled back a bit. Hmm. Now that I think about it, I wonder if I might not be able to do something that borrows something of the spirit of the "salt and hair spray" method, but with pieces of scrap paper or plastic. Basically, I'd paint things rusty (as usual) but then stick some piece of thin plastic scrap onto the surface (not glued, but allowed to just get stuck there by the paint? -- or, hey, maybe hair spray) and deliberately paint the "outer coating" all around it, and thickly. Then, go back with a fingernail and tear out the scrap that's buried in the paint. If I applied the outer "coat" of acrylic thickly enough, I ought to get some paint "tearing" at the edges. I guess the trick would be whether I'd end up destroying the underlying "rust" effect as well in the process. I suppose I could try experimenting on a piece of scrap plastic and see what comes of it. (And, hey, if I end up with a rusty, paint-peeling piece of scrap plastic, I could probably actually work it into something -- such as a junk wall barricade. :D )
  23. Jordan Peacock

    80034 Weapons Locker (for scatter terrain)

    Thanks! The guy is a Reaper mini as well, though one that doesn't appear to be in the Reaper store: S2P80003 "Deadlands: Hell on Earth - Librarian (male)" (from the "Deadlands: Hell on Earth" Kickstarter a few years back), sculpted by Bob Ridolfi. Normally the figure is holding some sort of "data pad," but I modified with some cardstock so he's holding a jumbo-sized edition of "Tesla" magazine. The pallets are from Warsenal (mini-kits of laser-cut MDF and acrylic). The street itself is made from Secret Weapon Miniatures Tablescapes "Urban Streets (damaged)" terrain tiles. The junky car is a McDonald's Happy Meal "Pixar Cars" toy from 2006 (minus the windshield/eye piece, and with some putty to "flatten" the tires). The robot to the right is a Brother Vinni resin model (Flybot).
  24. Jordan Peacock

    Adventuring Alice

    I'm very curious what sorts of considerations have to be made to a 3D model to make it more easily printable. From the context, I'm guessing that since the printer is (I suppose) "scanning" the figure up from the bottom, that sharp overhangs are a bad thing, because it can't start applying plastic in empty space and then connecting it to the main body several layers up from that point? Even the low-res mini looks great to me! At my level of painting skill, any additional fine detail would probably be wasted on me anyway. I really love the drapes and folds of the back of the dress, and the fantastically over-large hair! This would be a joy to paint up, I'm sure. :)
  25. Jordan Peacock

    Adventuring Alice

    Huh. With the translucent plastic, I guess you could leave the potion bottles un-primered (if you brush on primer everywhere else), and then do a wash effect on them instead? Or is the translucent plastic just what the 3D printer works with, rather than a specific choice? Also, what scale would this work out to be? The figure is 32mm tall, but it's of a *child*, so presumably would be shorter than full-grown adult characters at the same scale. (Unless, that is, she's already taken a bite out of the "Eat Me" cake, and therefore has just grown to larger-than-Alice-sized, in which case I suppose scale for a mini is an entirely subjective matter.)
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