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Pingo

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Everything posted by Pingo

  1. This is the classic Reaper 02551, Monique Denoir. There are some gorgeously painted examples of her out there. Some of this post is quoted from an earlier post, since I find that giving information in each thread is useful, even if in the big picture it's redundant. All paints used are Golden Matte Fluid Acrylics. Color mixes are (usually) noted, but not exact ratios. Questions are welcomed and I will try to answer them. Critiques are appreciated. Monique Denoir is a Werner Klocke scupt. Her face is classical and lovely. She's certainly popular, and there are many beautifully painted versions out there. This is the way I usually start miniature figures: Lightly primed with Titanium White, then when that is dry, washing it over with Burnt Umber. Burnt Umber is a dark, transparent pigment that settles into crannies when thinned down and shows the details very well. (I seem to be having a little trouble with it crackling just a bit in some areas, though.) It also gives a nice warm undertone to later paint layers (even though, as I've said before, with a vampire you don't necessarily want "warmth".) I like to paint skin first as something of the undermost layer. After I have the skin more or less smooth and correct I paint the features. I have been painting up vampires with stark white skin because I don't seem to have the knack to make them look undead if there is even a little flesh tone in their skin. This is almost the only time I ever mix grey from pure black and white (rather than a complex mix of brighter colors). The flatness of tone conveys that something is wrong with the individual, and the simplicity of color mix is very easy to shade. I started with a thin wash of pure Titanium White on her face, bust, and hands (I got her right hand wrong, I see in the photos. I missed her right thumb and painted up part of the sword instead. Be assured Werner Klocke's sculpt is much less clumsy than that. I will correct it later.). The first approximation of shadows are added, mixed from simple Titanium White and Carbon Black. And some darker and lighter greys. At the moment the shading is very stylized.
  2. This is an index thread for figures painted as Drow or dark elves which did not start out as official Drow figures. I thought people might like links to find figures which work well converted to dark elves, thus this index thread. It's not comprehensive, just some I've found. Feel free to add links if you find other figures which have been painted up as Drow. (I included pictures so it would be easier to see them and see if there are duplicates, but don't feel obliged.)
  3. This is one of those practice figures I had lying around, a Bones mini I didn't clean the flash off or prepare much, but was just painting for fun and practice while I was doing other things. (So I don't have a WIP, although I might be able to recreate one.) Then one of my GMs looked at it and said Yeah, that one, we'll need that. So I refined it up and finished it. This is a charmingly ludicrous female necromancer from the imagination of Bob Ridolfi. I painted her up with stark white skin -- oh, I can't remember why, originally, but now she is going to be used as a vampire, so that works. The skull she is holding is clearly a mask. It has a flat back. She was rather fun.
  4. Strictly speaking, whale "bone" wasn't bone at all. It was baleine, the flexible comblike tissue whales used to filter krill out of seawater. I have a boned silk blouse over a hundred years old. The baleine is shiny and black (it came in other colors, I am told, but these particular "bones" look like striated liquorice) and even now somewhat bendy. It resembles nothing so much as plastic. The ends are not especially poky; that seems to have been a hazard of the watchspring steel that replaced baleine as whales were hunted to near extinction. Actual bones as clothing, well, I'm not sure how you'd keep them from gapping as the body moves. This is a very silly figure and painting it was a hoot. But it's not exactly inspiring me to cosplay.
  5. Bad Squiddo Games' Dracula

    This is Dracula from Bad Squiddo Games' "My Last Sunrise" collection, an assortment of vampires, vampire hunters, and a few auxiliaries which was released in a very brief Kickstarter last summer. Annie, the Dice Bag Lady, runs fun Kickstarters. The three vampire brides I painted last month are from the same set. I don't have a WIP for him. Questions and comments appreciated.
  6. Pingo paints 02551: Monique Denoir

    Thank you. I hope I’ve managed to illustrate how the technique of layering works, how the colors beneath affect the ones above and in the end how simple it is.
  7. Thanks for the kind comments, everyone. When I started her I didn’t think she was going to be anything but silly, but she developed as she went along.
  8. Bad Squiddo Games' Dracula

    Thank you. I sometimes have a hard time seeing what my style is, but I’m glad people like it. This figure is an old standard type, a nice, solid basic useful vampire to put on the table. And I am kind of a sucker for a nice bright red cape lining.
  9. Thank you. It’s difficult, sometimes, for me to see how my painting is faring.
  10. The GM said we needed a nosferatu, so here we are. This is Reaper's 02867: Matthias the Twisted, a gnarly rattish vampire. All paints used are Golden Matte Fluid Acrylics. Color mixes are (usually) noted, but not exact ratios. Questions are welcomed and I will try to answer them. Critiques are appreciated. This is the way I usually start miniature figures: Lightly primed with Titanium White, then when that is dry, washing it over with Burnt Umber. Burnt Umber is a dark, transparent pigment that settles into crannies when thinned down and shows the details very well. It also gives a nice warm undertone to later paint layers. (I have to remember that I experimented with a cold blue-grey wash on some vampire figures that avoided all the nice warm undertones.) I paint vampires with stark white skin, shaded with flat greys mixed from Titanium White and Carbon Black. This is almost the only time I ever use such a simple mix for greys. The first layer is a thinned white (blodginess is the underpainting showing through). Steps in shading:
  11. I painted silver metallic on his sword, scabbard, leg armor, and buckles. ... Painted the gem on it (details available upon request) and touched up his bandages a bit. ... Glazed on lots of shadows, mostly in the maroon region (Ultramarine Blue + Red Oxide + Quinacridone Magenta). Also put on some highlight on his neck scarf. Added gold to the trim on his ragged overgarment. Glazed his neck scarf with pure very thin Phthalocyanine Blue. Brushed on lights with a pale yellow mixed from Titanium White and Yellow Ochre because I loved how Spooktalker's version made the fabric look all mangy and faded.
  12. I just read Geoge Orwell’s The Road to Wigan Pier. It is a lucid, devastating portrait of poverty in the UK during the Great Depression. What is especially depressing is how clearly he laid out the evil consequences of the then-current social policies which were reinstated as “austerity” roughly ten years or so ago in the UK which have led directly to pretty much the exact same evil consequences today.
  13. Woof, that was a bit of a downer, sorry, About to go off to the epic game fight that left off last session just as we entered the throne room. The GM’s map takes up the whole table and a bunch of columns and dungeon decor. And we have some innocents noncombat NPCs in tow. Should be interesting ...
  14. The Japanese tea house near me was torched after Pearl Harbor. :( Still a pretty garden there, anyway.
  15. 2863, 2872 Werewolves

    Yes. Yes, they are.
  16. The last time I saw a Brit refer to his “tea”, it was some sort of hot dog-like sausage bare on a plate with what might have been baked beans and mashed potatoes and a mug of tea to go with it. ”High tea”, which is what that was, is a good hearty meal served with tea. The teas my aunt likes to take us to with tiered plates of scones and tiny pastries and wee sandwiches with the crusts off are called “afternoon teas” or just plain “teas.”
  17. This is a reminder of where I left off, in the increasingly unlikely thought that some day I will go back and look at posts I missed. One of many reasons I like Golden paints is because they do that right on the label, a brushstroke of the actual paint over a black and white printed pattern. As for recent topics ... We travel through Niagara Falls with some regularity and have friends nearby. On a recent visit a friend recommended we stay at a casino hotel as they were said to be good quality and less expensive with decent food. The hotel was nice enough. It also had a remarkable amount of really nice original art and the restaurant was pretty nice and the staff friendly. But the whole place stank of ground-in cigarette smoke, even on the nonsmoking floors. My kids were covering their faces in the lobby. And to get from the lobby to the restaurants we had to go through the main casino floor. A guard had to escort us because children were not allowed there normally. The colors, noise, lighting and layout were staggeringly bewildering, I suspect deliberately. The most heartbreaking part was the people. They were so sad and glum and twitchy.
  18. Happy Birthday Pcktlnt !!!

    Hppy brthdy!
  19. Pingo paints 02551: Monique Denoir

    I painted metallics on her, gold on her necklace and silver on her sword blade and sheath, the rivets on her shield, and two buckles. The sword is painted shaded, more metallic on the top part than the bottom. Now I am going to glaze her armor with Quinacridone Magenta, a transparent brilliant cherry red. By itself it looks pretty eye-watering, but over oranges and browns like those on her armor it turns to deep crimson. This is the result:
  20. Thank you! Julie Guthrie did a great job sculpting him. I kept thinking of works from the Spanish Counter-Reformation as I was painting him. Yeah. Seems like half the vampires I’ve been painting have these serene wide-eyed sweet faces and half look inhuman and wretched and I’m not sure which are the more disturbing. The armor is basically a muddy dark brown rust color very lightly brushed on the high points with thinned silver metallic paint to make it look dark and old and worn. The ragged cloth hanging from his belt is essentially as it was after my initial priming. As I painted the rest of him up I liked more and more the stained, grimy look that came just from the umber wash. I cleaned up the highlights and added some yellows, but that’s all. As I have said before, I think blond vampires look especially creepy.
  21. Thank you! The principle of the velvet seems to work. I painted it up faster than I would have liked ... but I guess that’s true for most of my work. :) Anyhow, the secret seems to be to get all the shading right in the black and white layer first before adding any color.
  22. I'm playing in a World of Darkness campaign and we need a bunch of vampires. I'm adapting Patrick Keith's 60138: Sheila Heidmarch, Venture Captain to be a vampire, because not all female vampires hang around graveyards in unlikely and suspicious states of undress. All paints used are Golden Matte Fluid Acrylics. Color mixes are (usually) noted, but not exact ratios. Questions are welcomed and I will try to answer them. Critiques are appreciated. She's such a pretty and elegant figure! I left off her short sword and staff and filled in the slight dimples where they were meant to go with a little Golden Molding Paste applied with the point of a bamboo skewer. The stuff shrinks when drying, so I heaped it up a little. This is the way I usually start miniature figures: Lightly primed with Titanium White, then when that is dry, washing it over with Burnt Umber. Burnt Umber is a dark, transparent pigment that settles into crannies when thinned down and shows the details very well. (I seem to be having a little trouble with it crackling just a bit in some areas, though.) It also gives a nice warm undertone to later paint layers (even though, eh, with a vampire you don't necessarily want "warmth".) I like to paint skin first as something of the undermost layer. After I have the skin more or less smooth and correct I paint the features. I have been painting up vampires with stark white skin because I don't seem to have the knack to make them look undead if there is even a little flesh tone in their skin. Maybe I should paint them violet or something ... Anyhow, this is almost the only time I ever mix grey from pure black and white, rather than a complex mix of brighter colors. The flatness of tone conveys something wrong with the individual, and the simplicity of color mix is very easy to shade. I started with a thin wash of pure Titanium White on her face, neck, bust, and hands. Then (close ups for a while now) I laid in the first pale shadows. All greys are mixed from Titanium White and Carbon Black. Darker shadows and some lights. She's rather a mess now, but you can see how the skin shading is beginning to go.
  23. All Hallow's Eve - 01450

    This looks like a great figure to practice lighting effects on. I particularly like the way the light fades into a sunset orange at its fringes.
  24. 02875 Telmoraine

    Good, classic color choices. The face looks like it turned out well.
  25. I tidied up the edge under the trim on her dress (currently painted bright yellow) and painted everything I plan to paint red, gold, or brown pure Red Oxide. Iron oxide red is the traditional pigment to put under gilding. It seems to work pretty well under gold metallic paint too. Haven' t fixed the smoodge on her forehead yet (Note to self).
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