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Found 142 results

  1. I put together a few documents related to using Bones. I've submitted these to the Craft section of the website, but as it may be a little while before Reaper has the time available to add them, Bryan suggested that I post them here. Bones - Frequently Asked Questions Bones - Preparation (mould line removal, glue, putty, etc.) Bones - The First Coat is the Difference (this document) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Painting Bones Miniatures: The First Coat is the Difference One of the revolutionary features of Bones miniatures is that you can paint them straight out of the package. Because this is such a departure from recommendations for painting metal or resin miniatures, it is understandable that this feature raises questions and concerns for painters unfamiliar with Bones. Painters familiar with other types of miniatures will find that there are some differences in how the first coat of paint behaves, or that there are painting techniques or substances that require a little tweaking to use as a first coat on Bones figures. The Bones material is a little hydrophobic, meaning that it tends to repel water. Paint diluted with water, sometimes even just a little water, may display a tendency to bead up or pull away from crevices or higher raised areas. The more water added to the paint, the greater this effect. The first coat of paint applied to the surface can also take a little longer to dry than usual. The image on the left is a Bones figure straight out of the blister, the one on the right is a primed Dark Heaven metal miniature. Each was painted with a brushstroke of Master Series Walnut Brown paint of various dilutions. From right to left: undiluted; 1:1 paint water ratio; heavily diluted. On the Bones figure, the stripes painted with diluted paint display beading and pulling away, but the stripe painted with undiluted paint covers smoothly with clean edges. Once you apply a first coat of paint, primer or other appropriate surface preparation to a Bones miniature, you can freely use paint of any dilution and the full array of painting techniques! Painters who prefer to use thinned base coats, those who like to start with a dark wash over white primer, and those who use black or custom coloured primer need not despair! The following information will help you find ways to tweak your preferred techniques to work with the Bones material. It also includes information about brands of primer, paint and other substances that are known to work or not work well with Bones, and tests of the utility and durability of certain of these products on Bones. Slightly Thicker Paint Will Not Obscure All the Sculpted Details For years painters have been reading tips and tutorials that exhort them to thin their paints so as not to obscure the detail sculpted into their figures, and to obtain a better quality paint job. While it’s definitely the case that using excessively thick paint can affect detail and paint quality, I think it is also true that some people are worrying too much about this in regards to painting Bones. Reaper Master Series and Master Series HD are produced with a consistency pretty close to ideal for base coats. Several other miniature paint lines are produced in a similar consistency, or require only a small amount of water to reach the correct consistency. Two or three layers of such paint will not clog up all the detail on your model. Also, remember that when you paint metal or resin miniatures, you normally paint over a coat of primer. One layer of undiluted paint on a Bones miniature is equivalent in thickness (if not thinner) than one or two coats of primer on a metal or resin figure. The picture above is of four Bones bases. The tiny text relief sculpted into the bottom of these is a perfect way to test whether paint coats obscure small detail. Each of these bases was given four coats of a substance, and then brushed over with a paint wash to bring out the detail. (The bottles of paint and primer used in this test were fairly fresh, no more than a year or two old.) From left to right, the bases were coated with four coats of undiluted Master Series Pure White, four coats of undiluted Master Series White Primer, and four coats of undiluted Master Series Brush-On Sealer. I prepared a second base with the Brush-On Sealer as the wash didn’t quite turn out on the first. The word ‘Miniatures’ has lost a little detail on the base coated with four undiluted coats of paint, but apart from that both it and the primer coated base still have excellent detail. The text is still mostly legible on the bases coated with Brush-On Sealer, but some detail has been obscured. Wash Bones Figures Before Painting Many people find that the paint is less likely to bead up if the figure has been washed. Also, if you’ve had your figure out of the blister for a while, or you’ve handled it to remove mould lines or otherwise prepare it, you should clean it before painting, as it probably has dust and skin oils on it that may repel paint or cause paint to chip off after it has dried. All you need to clean it is some dishwashing liquid and an old toothbrush. Give it a scrub, and then rinse it really well to get off all the soap. Let it dry before painting. (You can hurry up the drying with a hairdryer set on low.) Black Primer? Custom Colours? Paint One Coat of Paint over the Entire Figure First! Some painters prefer to paint over black or gray primer. Others start with a primer of a particular colour to speed up painting units. For example, you could paint a coat of khaki on a unit of modern army figures and be half way finished painting their uniforms. One way to get the same effect as a dark wash over white primer on Bones is to first apply an all-over coat of white paint, followed by a dark wash. (Keep reading for other ways to do washes directly on Bones.) Some Primers Work on Bones Traditional metal or resin miniatures need to be primed before any paint is applied. Paint applied over bare metal does not adhere well, and rubs off with even light handling. Primer etches into the metal on a microscopic level. Paint adheres well to primer, so using it forms a stronger bond. Bones figures do not suffer from this issue! Acrylic paint painted directly onto the Bones surface is as durable, if not more durable, than if you use paint over primer on Bones. If you still prefer to use primer, Reaper’s Brush-On Primer works well on Bones, and is available in black and white. Another product people sometimes ask about is gesso. Fine arts painters use gesso to prepare canvases for painting. Some people have experimented with liquid gesso as a primer for miniatures, Bones and otherwise. People have reported it working in terms of creating a surface that you can paint thinned paint over. Reports vary as to how durable the material is, so it may not be the best choice for miniatures that are going to be handled. For those who prefer to use spray primer, the best option is to use an airbrush to apply a coat of acrylic paint to the Bones figure. Reaper Master Series paint thins well with Golden or Liquitex Airbrush Medium, and maintains its strong adhesion, though I have found that adding airbrush medium does noticeably increase the drying time of the paint. Aerosol spray primers and some spray paints can have some issues with Bones (and with other plastics). The chemicals in some of these primers and paints do not react well with Bones. The main effect seems to be that the primer never completely cures, remaining tacky to the touch. Some will also fail to form a bond with the Bones material. The following is a list of aerosol paints and primers that people on the Reaper forums have reported testing on Bones. Please consider the list just a guide. The best idea is to test your chosen spray by using it on a small Bones figure you don’t care about a lot. After you give the spray time to cure, carefully look over the figure to make sure the chemicals in the spray haven’t reacted with the Bones material to melt or otherwise damage it. If not, test the primer surface by touching it to see if it stays too tacky to paint over. Also, flex parts of the figure to make sure the primer doesn’t crack. Note: Some people have successfully used Krylon primer, and possibly other spray primers that some people have reported as problematic. And other people have reported problems with primers that some felt worked well. One difference seems to be that a light spray rather than a heavy coating is more likely to minimize tackiness. Environmental factors such as temperature and humidity are also always a big variable with any spray product. Recommended aerosol spray primers and paints: Army Painter white and coloured primers Krylon Dual Paint + Primer Duplicolor Sandable – slight tackiness possible Rust-oleam Painter’s Touch Ultra Cover 2x – slight tackiness possible Problem aerosol spray primers and paints: Krylon white primer – doesn’t bond, stays tacky Testors Enamel flat black – stays tacky Walmart Valu flat white – stays tacky Krylon Primer red-brown – stays tacky Citadel spray Use a Medium to Thin Your Paint or Make a Wash Water is the element in thinned paint that causes it to bead up on the Bones surface. If you try thinning your paint with a dilutant other than water, you may be able to create a mix that is closer to the consistency you like to paint with. Depending on what you use, you can even create something translucent enough to act as a wash or glaze directly on the Bones. Mediums designed to work with acrylic paints are good products to try. Examples are matte medium, glazing medium, airbrush medium. Reaper’s Brush-On Sealer can be used this way. Note that many of these products are a little less fluid than water, so they may not dramatically change the consistency of the paint (it’ll still feel a little thick rather than watery, but it will look a lot more transparent). You can also test adding just a drop or so of water to your mix of paint and medium to see if you can get closer to the consistency you prefer. I diluted some Master Series Bone Shadow with various mediums to make washes. From left to right, the products are listed below. Master Series Brush-On Sealer: I added one drop of water to a large drop of paint and several drops of Sealer. Worked well. Liquitex Matte Medium: A thick product. I added a drop of water. Beads up too much to work well for a wash. Liquitex Glazing Medium: Another thick product, I added a drop of water to my mix. Took longer to dry than the others. Did not sit in crevices well enough to work well for a wash. Very shiny finish. Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium: Applied well, dried quickly. Even application of the colour. Delta Ceramcoat All-Purpose Sealer: Worked decently, seems a bit more inclined to pool in the crevices with less colouring on the surfaces. Shiny finish. ADDEDUM (not pictured) Golden Acrylic Flow Release (undiluted): Applied well. Took a little while to dry. Shiny finish. Reaper Flow Improver: Applied well. Took a little while to dry. Finish is shiny in areas where wash pooled. Use a Medium as a Primer Because of how well acrylic based products adhere to the Bones material, it is also possible to use mediums as a primer alternative. Once dry, you can paint over them using thinned paint. These are applied by brush, or possibly with an airbrush. I tested a number of different brush-on products on some Bones Cave Trolls. These were straight out of the package and had not been cleaned. After the products dried, I applied a thin coat of paint to see how it behaved over each product. Reaper Master Series Brush-On Primer: Exhibited slight pulling away from some high or curved surfaces, though generally it just required running the brush over that section again to establish coverage. Dried quickly. Reaper Master Series Brush-On Sealer: No significant beading. Dried quickly. Paint was less durable than with the other products, see the durability testing section for more details and pictures. Golden Airbrush Medium: Bubbled a bit when applied, thin enough to pool a bit in depressions. Took more than 40 minutes to dry. This product works well if you use a drop or three to thin paint down for a base coat, although it does increase the drying time slightly. Due to it drying time, this is not the best choice as a primer alternative or for thinning washes that will be applied directly over Bones. Liquitex Matte Medium: Somewhat thick. Minor beading and pulling away. Significant beading when thinned with water. Dried quickly. When paint was applied, there were still some mild occurrences of paint pulling away from higher/curved areas. Liquitex Glazing Medium: Pretty thick consistency. Dried fairly quickly. The paint coat still beaded a little. Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium: Dried fairly quickly. Paint went on quite nicely. Also works on metal miniatures. Delta Ceramcoat All-Purpose Sealer: Dried quickly. The paint layer exhibited slightly pulling way. Folk Art Blending Gel: Extremely thick. Beaded up too much to use. Not pictured as it worked too poorly to continue to the testing stage. Speed Paint Drying with a Hairdryer Whether on a Bones or metal miniature, if you find that your paint is taking too long to dry, you can speed up the drying by using a hairdryer on the low setting on the paint. If the paint you’re drying is a wash, you should let it dry naturally for a little bit, or you risk blowing the paint out of the crevices and depressions you want to darken. Testing the First Coats for Durability Once you get your paint applied, you want to make sure that it stays there. In my experiments, the most durable Bones miniatures are those where the first coat applied to the miniature is undiluted Master Series paint. Several of the other substances I tested were pretty close in durability, but it should be noted that there were a few that performed poorly. I painted these ghosts in August 2012. They accompanied me to Gen Con and Pax Prime 2012, stored loose with some unpainted Bones in a plastic container I carried in my backpack. Their travels included a six hour car ride and return plane trip. At the conventions they were handled extensively by dozens upon dozens of people, including being tossed on tables. The paint jobs were stressed pretty much equally through the Gen Con trials. The ghost painted only with Reaper Master Series paint was handled a lot more than the others during the Pax Prime trials. The ghost sculpt has some thin and thus particularly bendy areas, most notably on the hood and where it meets the tombstone. I flexed these parts by hand repeatedly to additionally stress the paint. Unfortunately I chose poor colours to easily be able to see all the damage in the photos. After the first coat I used painting techniques of thinned layers and washes with no difficulty and with the same effect on each of the miniatures. From left to right the first coat on each miniature was as follows. Undiluted Reaper Master Series Paint: Displayed the least damage during the Gen Con trials. Following Pax, has some chips at the flex point on the hood and near the tombstone. Was handled a lot more than the other figures. Reaper Master Series Brush-On White Primer: A few very small chips at the flex points, and some paint has scraped off a few sharp protruding areas. (Edge of the hood, finger tips on one hand.) Dupli-Color Sandable White Primer Spray: The unpainted base stayed slightly tacky to the touch for weeks after priming. The figure has several small areas where paint was scraped off, but only one chip on a flex point. Testors Dullcote Spray: This product created a good surface for painting, but performed very poorly in the paint durability tests, and I would not recommend using it as a primer substitute if you plan to use your Bones for gaming. Chips formed on the major flex points early in the Gen Con testing, and the paint has flaked off extensively from there. The figure also has some small areas of scraping damage, but those are no more notable than on the Brush-On Primer or Dupli-Color figures. I wanted to perform a similar test with the other surface preparation products I tried. First I painted on an additional coat or two of paint. Then I placed the figures loose in a plastic box with some other Bones, a wooden, MDF and plastic base, and a metal figure. After wrapping the box in a towel secured with rubber bands, I put it in my dryer on the air setting for 10 minutes or so. The green painted areas on each figure are those that were painted over the primer alternatives. The brown painted areas are Master Series Paint directly on the Bones surface. (These were part of tests for methods to remove mould lines.) The brown areas on each exhibit very little damage. Some have none, some have a few small chips or scrapes. (However it should be noted the brown area of this sculpt has far fewer surface protrusions than where the green was painted.) From left to right: Reaper Master Series Brush-On Primer White; Reaper Master Series Brush-On Sealer; Golden Airbrush Medium; Liquitex Matte Medium. Three of the four show pretty similar levels of damage. The figure painted with Brush-On Sealer as a primer displays the most paint damage of all figures tested in this series. From left to right: Liquitex Glazing Medium; Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium; Delta Ceramcoat All-Purpose Sealer. Damage levels are pretty similar to the better performers above. The Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium and Liquitex Glazing Medium performed the best of the seven products tested. (The Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium performed better in terms of acting as a primer, and is inexpensive, so would be my recommendation between those two.)
  2. I put together a few documents related to using Bones. I've submitted these to the Craft section of the website, but as it may be a little while before Reaper has the time available to add them, Bryan suggested that I post them here. Bones - Frequently Asked Questions (this document) Bones - Preparation (mould line removal, glue, putty, etc.) Bones - The First Coat is the Difference (primer, primer alternatives, paint durability) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Bones Miniatures: Frequently Asked Questions What are Bones Miniatures? The Bones material is a polymer plastic. It is light-weight and slightly flexible, and is very durable. You can paint a Bones figure straight out of the package, and that paint job will also be pretty durable. Bones figures are as detailed as metal figures, for a much lower cost. Bones miniatures are produced with integral (built-in) bases, but it is easy to cut the miniature off of the base if you prefer to put it on something else. It is also easy to cut the figures apart to convert them into different poses or change weapons. What is the bare minimum I need to know to start painting my Bones right now! If you want background on why these are the recommendations or what other alternatives might also work, read the rest of this document, Painting Bones Miniatures: Preparation and Painting Bones Miniatures: The First Coat is the Difference. Remove Mould Lines Remove by slicing just under the mould lines with a hobby knife, in a similar motion to paring vegetable or hand-sharpening a pencil. Files work best if you file in one direction, then remove burrs by filing in the opposite direction. Reshape Bent Parts Dip the misshapen piece in boiling water for a minute or two, remove and move into desired position, then immediately hold in ice water for a few minutes. NOTE: Read additional information in this document for safety recommendations! What Glue to Use Superglue aka cyanoacrylate works best to glue Bones to itself or other materials. What Putty to Use All major brands of putty tested work with bones. (Green Stuff, Milliput, etc.) What Works as a Paint Stripper Soak figure in Simple Green Concentrated All Purpose Cleaner for 12 – 24 hours, then scrub it with an old toothbrush. Best Primer None. Start with a first coat of undiluted Reaper Master Series Paint, then paint as normal from there. This is the best choice for durability and a good painting surface. Other acrylic paints that work with miniatures should have similar results. Paint can be applied with a brush or airbrush (diluted paint seems to work with an airbrush.) Best Primer if You Want to Prime Anyway Reaper Master Series Brush-On Primer in black or white, or Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium (also brush-on.) Best Spray Primer Many aerosol primers will not cure completely on Bones. Reaper forum members have reported good results with the Army Painter sprays. How to Do a Wash Directly on Bones Thin your wash with one of the following mediums and just a small amount of water if necessary: Master Series Brush-On Sealer, Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium, Delta Ceramcoat All-Purpose Sealer. Can you really paint Bones miniatures straight out of the package? Absolutely! However, if you’ve ever painted metal, resin or plastic figures in the past, you may notice some differences in how the first coat of paint behaves. Paint diluted with water (even just a drop or two for a thinned base coat) may bead up and pull away from crevices. The more water you add to the paint, the more you’ll notice this effect, so water-thinned washes used directly on the Bones material don’t really work. That first coat of paint may also take a little longer to dry. Most people find that the paint applies a little better if you first wash the figure. Just scrub it with a little dish soap and a toothbrush and allow it to dry before you start to paint. Another alternative is to apply a primer or another surface preparation that works with the Bones material as the first coat. Once you get that first coat on, you can use highly thinned paint in subsequent layers and it should behave pretty much the same as on any other figure. For more information, methods to use thinned paint directly on the Bones surface, tips for quicker drying and a list of primers that do (or don’t) work with Bones, please see the Craft document Painting Bones Miniatures: The First Coat is the Difference. What kinds of paint work on Bones Miniatures? The Bones material is designed to work with Reaper’s Master Series and Master Series HD lines of paint. Internal testing and feedback from customers suggests that Bones also works well with the other major miniature paint lines, including Reaper’s discontinued Pro Paints, Vallejo Game Color, Vallejo Model Color, Privateer Press’ P3 Paints, and Games Workshop. Artists’ acrylic paint are also likely to work on Bones. However, please note that Reaper does not offer any guarantee or assurance that the Bones miniatures will work with any particular paint other than Master Series and Master Series HD. You are advised to test your preferred paint on a Bones figure to decide for yourself how well it works. If your paint does not work well on bare Bones, you can prepare the surface with a coat of Master Series paint and it will likely work over that. How do I remove the mould lines from a Bones figure? Like all miniatures, Bones figures have small mould lines as a result of the manufacturing process. You do not need to remove these to paint or use a Bones, but many people prefer to remove them for aesthetic reasons. You can remove these with the same tools you would use on a metal figure – hobby knife, files, and/or sandpaper. However, you may find that you need to use these materials in a slightly different way. Hobby knives work best if you slice under and along the mould line in a paring motion rather than scraping them along the mould line. With files and sandpaper, file in one direction perpendicular to the mould line. If you find you have burrs of material remaining, lightly file those off moving the tool in the opposite direction. How Durable is the Bones Material? Bones figures are remarkably durable, and not just in comparison to metal and resin figures. People have dropped Bones from a height of one storey, ground them underfoot, driven over them with a car, carried them loose in backpacks and pockets, and they’ve sustained no damage. The light weight of the material means drops and falls hit with much less mass behind them. The give of the material means it’s much better able to absorb impact, where a brittle material like resin will likely break. They’re not indestructible, but they can take an impressive amount of damage. We had several Bones figures out at the PAX Prime 2012 convention for people to examine and abuse. We bounced them off the floor, and invited dozens of people to step on them. One of the small kobolds with narrow diameter legs did break at one ankle on the third day. Another figure suffered a very small area of damage due to the friction generated by someone’s shoe grinding it across the floor. If Bones are so durable, is it hard to cut them up for conversions? What glue should I use? The Bones material cuts easily with a sharp hobby knife. Cuts have smooth edges and do not deform surrounding material as often happens with metal. So it is an easy matter to swap a head from one figure to another, or cut off an arm and reposition it slightly so you can customize individual figures within a unit. All it takes to glue them back together is regular superglue (cyanoacrylate). You can also use superglue to adhere Bones to metal or wood. Green Stuff and other two-part putties work well if you need to fill gaps or sculpt on additional details. Pinning is a good idea when attaching metal parts to a Bones miniature, as the added weight of the metal will otherwise make the join weaker. The plastic parts are quite stable when glued together, but pinning doesn’t hurt in plastic-to-plastic conversions, either. How durable is a painted Bones figure, though? Bones miniatures painted with Master Series and Master Series HD paint are surprisingly durable. You probably don’t want to grind one underfoot or drive over it with your car, but you’ll be amazed at what they can handle. Figures are unlikely to experience notable damage to the paint from regular handling, bumping against each other on the table, or getting knocked over, even when playing with the most ham-handed of players. My painted test figures survived being tossed unsecured in a plastic box with a bunch of unpainted Bones that was carried around two conventions (PAX Prime and Gen Con 2012). They were handled by hundreds of people and literally and repeatedly thrown onto tables from heights of several feet. They have some dings and chips, but the bulk of the paint jobs survived. The paint on these figures had not been coated with any sort of protective sealer. The durability of other brands of paint may vary. I have not done the same sort of extensive testing with other brands of paint. In my limited testing of how well other brands of paint apply to bare Bones, I did notice that Vallejo Model Color paints seemed to rub off the figure pretty easily. I did not notice that happening with the other brands I tested. (P3, Vallejo Game Color, Pro Paint, Adikolor.) Can you remove unwanted paint from a Bones figure? Sometimes painting a figure doesn’t go exactly as planned. If you would like to strip the paint from a Bones figure so you can start from scratch to paint it another way, just drop it into a dish of Simple Green Concentrated All Purpose Cleaner for 12 – 24 hours, then scrub it with an old toothbrush and it is ready to paint again. Some paint colours may leave a stain on the Bones material, but should not leave any texture or affect subsequent layers of paint. Simple Green in an eco-friendly cleaner sold in most hardware stores and some grocery stores. Brake fluid also works, though is a much more toxic material. Are Bones figures less detailed than their metal counterparts? Bones figures are bright white, which makes them hard to photograph. A number of people who have lacked confidence in the product quality based on the photographs in the online store have been pleasantly surprised by them once they can look at one in person. However, there are also a few people who feel the quality of the Bones is a little less than that of their metal counterparts. When available, Reaper’s online store includes photographs of painted versions of the figures that may give you a better idea, but looking at Bones yourself in person is really the only way to find out how you feel about them. I compared one of the smaller Bones, Dwarf Warrior 77011, against his counterpart, Fulumbar 14146, under magnification. The only real difference I noted between the two was that the texture of the chainmail loin cloth and the laces on the gloves were a tiny bit shallower on the Bones figure. You can see a comparison of a Bones and metal figure of the same sculpt painted identically in this thread on the Reaper forums: http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?/topic/47477-bathalian-bones-vs-metal-challenge/ Do Bones have sharp edges on weapons? Weapons and the like on Bones figures are cast at pretty much the same thickness as similar parts on Reaper’s metal figures. However, since Bones is a flexible plastic material, you will never be able to shave or file down an edge or a point to the same sharpness that you can achieve with a metal figure. Are the photographs of Bones figures in the online store and catalogue the same figures as the ones for sale? The online Reaper store and catalogue photographs of Bones miniatures are taken of production run figures – the same figures that Reaper packages up to sell. Can I do anything about a bent spear or sword on a Bones figure? You may find that sometimes the thinner parts on Bones, like spears and swords, will look a little bent. Or the figure might be leaning back or forward too much on its ankles. If you want to straighten those out, hold the figure with tongs or in a colander, and dip it into boiling or near boiling water for at least a minute or two. Remove it from the water, reposition the part, and immediately dunk it into a bowl of ice water for at least a minute. It should hold in the new position. If you expose the figure to heat at a later time, it may revert to its original position. For this reason, if you want to wash the figure with soap and water prior to painting, you should use cool water or wash it before you heat it to reset a warped part. Important safety notes: Please exercise caution! The Bones material may get hot when dipped in boiling water, so you should use protective gear rather than touching it with your bare fingers. The Bones material might be damaged or damage your pot if placed in direct contact with the pot surface. If you are under the age of 18, please ask your parents for permission and have them read this section before boiling Bones figures. Are Bones made in China or the United States? All Bones figures made prior to March 2013 were produced in China. In March 2013, Reaper installed the machine necessary to produce Bones in its factory in Texas, and began the process of transferring production in-house.
  3. So in preparation for the arrival of the ks bones I recently ordered some craft acrylics, specifically these . Now I have read on some other sites about people complaining that craft acrylics have a smaller "pigment/medium ratio" than model paints because you have to dilute the craft paints more. So first question, in your own experience how true is this statement? And second question, if the above is held to be true, could this not be remedied by just using more brush strokes when painting? Also since im on the topic of using different types of paints I may as well ask this: Is it possible to use both craft and model paints of the same mini or does this combination go horribly wrong? Actually this question should be asked in two parts. First when talking about using the two on different layers, ie: craft for base/shading/highlights and model for details or any combination of base/shading/highlights and detail between the two types. Second when talking about mixing the two types of paints for creating custom colours?
  4. redambrosia

    Paint and Green stuff

    I have a couple of pieces I'm working on right now which, due to their fiddly bits, will require green stuff in their joints. However, also due to their fiddly bits, I have to paint under the bits I'm attaching before I attach them, otherwise I'd never be able to paint under them all the way (or make it look good anyway). Does anyone have advice on how to approach this? I'm worried about ruining my paint job with green stuff or wrestling the bits in their joints.
  5. Stumbled on these. The guy does a really good impartial review of the 4 major brands and the qualities and such of each one. Newest without Citadel/GW paint Reaper vs Vallejo: Citadel/GW vs P3
  6. Some of these came back as other numbers, but but the rest won't be brought back by Reaper and some might be present in other paint lines. (Twilight Triad 9727) 9079 Deep Amethyst 9080 Indigo Sky 9081 Pale Indigo - mix equal portions of Imperial Purple and Sky Blue (Colored Liners Triad 9738) 9112 Red Liner - Reaper 9235 (Back in Bones 3 as 9307) 9113 Green Liner - Reaper 9236 (Back in Bones 3 as 9308) 9114 Violet Liner - Reaper 9237 (Muted Purples Triad 9740) 9118 Dusky Grape 9119 Bruise Purple 9120 Faded Purple (Clear Brights III Triad 9744) 9130 Clear Orange - Lava Orange 9218 and Explosion Orange 9219 9131 Clear Viridian - Peacock Green 9226 9132 Clear Plum - Royal Purple 9240 (Blush Colors Triad 9747) 9139 Antique Rose - KS Old West Rose 9140 Blushing Rose 9141 Porcelain Rose (Historic Blues Triad 9751) 9151 Steely Blue 9152 Military Blue - Reaper 9269 9153 Weathered Blue (Desert Camos Triad 9752) 9154 Dune Shadow 9155 Desert Khaki 9156 Desert Sand (Mist Greens Triad 9756) 9166 Shadow Green - Reaper 9270 9167 Field Green 9168 Mist Green (Terracotta Clays Triad 9757) - Redstone Triad 9775 9169 Muddy Clay 9170 Terracotta Clay 9171 Fired Clay (Cold Greys Triad 9758) 9172 Stormcover Grey 9173 Coldstone Grey 9174 Icy Grey - KS Aircraft Grey (slightly greener) (Volcano Browns Triad 9760) 9178 Cinder Brown 9179 Volcano Brown - Reaper 9268 9180 Ashen Brown - MSP HD 29831 (Tropical Colors Triad 9761) 9181 Bright Coral 9182 Saffron sunset - Reaper 9247 9183 Cloud Pink - KS Reaper Punk rock Pink (Reptilian Greens Triad 9762) 9184 Serpentine Shadow 9185 Reptus Green 9186 Scaly Highlight (Sandy Colors Triad 9764) 9190 Sandy Brown - Reaper 9249 9191 Sandy Tan 9192 Sandy Yellow (Sea Blues Triad 9765) 9193 Stormy Sea 9194 Clouded Sea 9195 Seafoam Blue (Humanoid Skintones Triad 9768) 9202 Troll Shadow - MSP Stained Olive 29838 9203 Gnoll Brown 9204 Halforc Highlight (Reaper Ink II Triad 9771) 9211 Green Ink 9212 Blue Ink 9213 Purple Ink (Spring Greens Triad 9749) 9145 Moth Green - Reaper 9248 9146 Spring green - Reappaearance at RCon 2015 9147 Luminous Green - Reaper 9248 + 1 drop of white (Heavy Gear paints) RPR 61101 Terra Nova Tundra (Possible alternative: NMM gold?) RPR 61102 Macallen Brown RPR 61103 Redrider Crimson RPR 61104 Dune Shadow RPR 61105 Mekong Moss RPR 61106 Giant Fern RPR 61107 Okavango Swamp RPR 61108 Republique Red RPR 61109 Armadillo Tusk (hd) RPR 61110 White Sand RPR 61111 Paxton Red RPR 61112 War Paint Red RPR 61113 Arthurian Blue (hd) RPR 61114 Blue Crescent RPR 61115 Atlantean Aqua RPR 61116 Coated Armor RPR 61117 Factory White (Ghost white + Blue Flame perhaps?) RPR 61118 Grel Flesh RPR 61119 Afterburn Grey RPR 61120 Hazard Yellow (hd) RPR 61121 R.a.m. Black (hd) RPR 61122 Durasheet Alloy RPR 61123 Skunkworks Gunmetal RPR 61124 Beacon Yellow RPR 61125 Fallout Grey (hd) RPR 61126 Ash Grey RPR 61127 Waveform Aquamarine RPR 61128 Gamma Shielding Gold RPR 61129 Cat's Eye Umber (hd) RPR 61130 Cat's Eye RPR 61131 Red Dust RPR 61132 Drillbit Metal
  7. I looked but did not see a list of guidelines or rules for submissions for the paint competition for Reapercon. I know that only all reaper miniatures are eligible for a Sophie, but what are the categories this year and are their any rules for submissions? I heard a rumor that there will not be an ordinance section this year? Also I am asking about rules because I have some ideas but some may consider them... bending the line of decency. Remember, I paint next to Martin at Paint club... :) Just wanted to make sure that there were no offensive dioramas submitted or over the top paints. Thanks, Xanderhook
  8. smokingwreckage

    Browns and Colour Theory

    I lost the thread, someone asked about browns on the colour wheel. They are very dull (desaturated, I think) oranges and yellows. And now you know.
  9. Demogon

    Paint Brushes

    Hi, Just looking for some advice it's been around 10 years since I painted any minis and I backed the Kickstarter so just wondering what kind of brushes people have been using and where do you get them? The small town I live in has no hobby shop! Any help is appreciated thanks in advance.
  10. Evil Savage

    Painted Product Pics

    I've noticed recently that all the new figures are given a paint job. While I understand that it's more eye catching, and it may be inspiring, but I find it kind of limiting. I personally would prefer an unpainted picture when ordering models. I've actually painted over the raw pictures in photoshop to plan out my color scheme. It's been bugging me for a while, but I really caught my attention with the release of the pictures of the Red Petals Su model for Deadlands. Unless you're a long time deadlands fan like me you might not catch it, but Su is Chinese, and the picture for the model makes her a blonde. Basically, I think the paint jobs are beautiful, but I'd really like to still have the an example of the raw unfinished model that i'm going to actually get.
  11. So. I used to be a mini painter back when I was a kid. I have been playing tabletop rpgs steadily for over 30 years, but haven't done minis for the last 20. I did, however, get my art degree and became a pro artist in the meanwhile, so I know some technae. However, my understanding of mini painting is stuck at kid level, when I used acrylics but did not speak with anyone else or know the terminology or (to be honest) paint very well. Now I'm working as a beginner again, here to learn, but since I also have an art background I find myself wondering about certain aspects of mini painting. For example, why is dry brushing considered a quick and dirty method of highlighting? I understand it as a way to do some very subtle blending (on the macro scale, anyway). What would be the more careful version of painting that it is a substitute for? I also have questions about how people understand the terminology. For example, I've noticed regular use of the term "glaze," which seems to be understood as a wash of a darker color over a lighter one to increase its intensity or, especially in the case of minis, to bring out its texture. Mini painting seems to use only the wet sense of "glaze" (but then, to be fair, so do most fine artists). But "glaze" can also be used to mean dry brushing with a transparent darker color over a lighter one, which can generate some very interesting effects. I have not seen use of the counterpart to "glaze," which is "scumble." "Scumbling" is the same as "glazing," but using a lighter, semi-opaque color over a darker one. It's very good for pearly, moonlit effects and fog and atmospherics. Do people use this technique? And if so, what do they call it? I'm sure I'll think of other questions as I go along, but that's it for starters.
  12. So I am getting back into painting miniatures after a long, long hiatus. In preparation for this I have been going through my paints and seeing what, if any, are still good. I used Games Workshop paints almost exclusively back then and really loved the quality, price and ease of clean up. These are all from the early to mid 90s and still seem in good shape. My question is - how does Reaper Paints compare? I'm getting the Kickstarter Bones miniatures sets and saw they have some good deals on 24 paints of what look to be pretty useful colours. I just want to know if any of the 'old timers' here have any experience with the 'classic' GW paints and the newer Reaper ones. Are the Reaper ones as good? Better? A lot better? Thanks in advance to anyone who can help a guy out!
  13. Dr.Bedlam

    Basic Dirt

    So I'm scrolling along the paints selection, and I run across one I had never noticed before. I very much like the idea that Reaper produces a paint called "Basic Dirt." Did you guys send Bryan or Anne out to verify it?
  14. Just thought I'd post a home-made paint mixer I fabbed up. I did a commission recently that required a lot of shades of paint. Even though RMS paints are easy to shake, some of mine are getting long in the tooth (thickening) and shaking them was becoming tiresome... I was going to buy some kind of scientific lab shaker on ebay, but even the used, crappy ones were going for $40 and might come with an unexpected gift of anthrax or something... And I had a deadline to meet so shipping wasn't an option. So I made my own paint shaker out of parts I had lying around. I did some surfing and found other painters' ideas I combined into a working unit. I've made one before, but it was a cheesy thing with a weighted CD-ROM motor attached to a film canister, suspended by an o-ring. I wanted something more effective, easier to use, and able to hold multiple paints at once. I ran across someone who attached a motor to a plastic tray and hung it from rubber bands. It worked nice, but clattered the heck out of the paints in the tray. However, it gave me an idea - I figured the scientific shakers had some kind of rubber isolator to keep the shaker from transferring vibrations to the table. So here's what I came up with: All told this cost me $0, since I had all the parts on hand. But, it should cost under $20 to make depending on what parts you can scrounge or buy. WARNING - I provide this article as an example for entertainment purposes only, and take NO responsibility for anyone attempting to build a similar device. DO NOT attempt to do this unless you have a basic knowledge of mechanics or electronics. NO ONE under the age of 18 should attempt to build this. Parts list: 12v computer fan (80mm or larger and at least 200mA for max. vibration) plug-in 12v DC transformer - should match the mA rating of the fan. (I used a 14v @ 100mA, though, which worked fine - higher voltages can lessen motor life though...) protective screen or mesh for fan (don't use the chrome ones with big openings- you'll see why in the description) plastic tray ($1 for 2 @ drugstore) rubber non-slip shelf liner rubber weather-stripping insulation assorted screws 4 hollow rubber feet - sourced from a DVD player, but can be found in electronic supply houses wire crimp connectors wire cutting/crimping tool on-off switch (optional) - I didn't have one handy, so I just plug it in lead foil or similar flat weight super glue or E6000 double-sided tape rubber cement As you can see the tray was just screwed to the top part of the fan's screen with some small electronics screws. I drilled pilot holes with my pin-vise and screwed it down. I stuck the non-slip sheeting on the tray with double-sided tape. The weather-stripping foam is self-adhesive - I used enough thickness to be able to hold a bottle firmly on its side. This guarantees maximum shaking of the paint: I then prepped the fan by gluing pieces of lead foil on one blade with super glue. (The white residue is from zip-kicker.) Flat, thin pieces of lead worked best. I could shape them to the fan blade profile before gluing. I tried a flattened fishing weight first and it flew off as soon as I fired up the fan (you DID read my warning right?!?) Tiny sticker of Iron Man can be added to fan blade later if desired. A few pieces were enough to off-balance the fan so it shook when it turned - like a cell phone vibrator, but much stronger. (I used maybe a 1/4 oz worth of lead.) Next I screwed down the fan to the tray and attached the bottom screen. The screen is crucial so if lead does fly off the fan blade later it won't shoot across the room... However – the weighted side of the fan blade is pointing at the bottom of the tray, so chances are it won’t fly anywhere dangerous but into the bottom. You can add metal mesh if you feel totally paranoid but after several weeks of using this gizmo I've had no mishaps. I glued the rubber feet to the bottom screen with rubber cement. You can see here the hollow rubber will isolate the mixer from the surface it's on. Finally I cut the leads from the fan and crimped them onto the transformer's wires. (The blue wire shown in the fan close up wasn't "live" - I assume it's for speed control or something I didn't need, so I snipped it off.) Caveats – I don’t know how long the fan will last, since it wasn’t designed to spin unbalanced and push air against a solid plastic surface. Eventually the bearing will go, but it’s easy enough to get a new fan. The transformer doesn’t get hot after 5 minutes’ straight shaking so I assume I’ll never have to replace that… So how's it work? It doesn't vibrate my workbench - all the shaking goes into the paints. The tray slides over maybe a 1/2 inch when it first spins up, but then settles into a groove and won't move again. See the video for a sound level - it's much quieter than a computer fan when it's at max cooling. Quiet enough to be of no disturbance at night (my studio is next to my daughter's bedroom.) Here are some examples of paints I shook. The Vallejo red hasn’t been used for 5 years (I’m not lying! - ever since I switched to RMS paints.) 2 minutes shaking and it pours almost like new! The RMS paints were thinned perfectly in 1 minute or less, though some bottles thicken up with time (even a mixer won't fix that!) so a little distilled water may help with older bottles. As you see, the tray can hold up to 6 paints side by side, but I wouldn't add more than that or the rubber feet might compress too much from the weight. And it does a decent job of rolling dice too - though probably not fast enough for most gamers... Not bad for 30 minutes' work! ;)
  15. redfox4242

    Paint Question

    I just bought a half dozen miniatures from Reaper and I was excited to discover that a free dropper bottle of paint had been included with my order. That was a cool bonus. I have been examining the bottle and I used the paint on one of my models. I like it and it's great stuff. I cannot figure out what color I have been given. There was no color name on the label. My best guess is that this is Muddy Brown 09028. I got that notion from browsing the Reaper site and looking at color swatches. I was wondering if any knowledgeable person on these message boards could tell me with certainty what color I have here. Thanks very much. Here is a picture of my bottle of paint:
  16. I'm so excited to share this news: Game Empire Painting Tournament March 25, 2012, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 7051 Clairemont Mesa Blvd, #306 San Diego, CA 92117 858-576-1525 Cost: FREE!!!!! Prize pool includes store credit, brushes from Army Painter, cool stuff from Games Workshop, Reaper minis, and more! Basic supplies, minis, basing materials, and drinks will be free to participants. Da Roolz: Minis from any company, current or defunct, are acceptable. Mini must be primed and assembled when registered. (This rule can be bent, but will waste your precious painting time.) Primed and assembled minis will be made available in the “up to 28 mm categories”, while supplies last. Pre-painted minis not accepted for this tournament. Please register with a monitor before beginning to apply color. We will number the bottom of your mini. Use your stuff, use stuff from the supplies. It’s all good. Seasoned pros are likely to have their own supplies and should leave the communal supplies for the amateurs. We’re not sticklers, it’s just good manners. Don’t be a jerk. If you’re nasty to the other competitors, you may be asked to leave. Even young’uns are expected to have good manners. Basing: (That means adding cool stuff, like rocks and sticks to the floor of your mini.) This isn’t necessary, but highly encouraged. And it sure makes your mini look awesome… Due to their overwhelming awesomeness, Game Empire employees are not allowed to enter this contest. Too bad you rock. Categories: Young Bloods: up to and including age 14—must have ID or a guardian to verify age. No professionals. Prizes awarded to first, second, and third places. (all sizes) Pro: If you have ever been paid to paint minis, this is your category. Two size categories: a.) up to 28mm, and b.) over 28mm. Yes, Virginia, there are professionals under age 15. Get over it. They might just kick your hiney. Amateur: No professionals. Two size categories: a.) up to 28mm, and b.) over 28mm. (If you have ever been paid to paint minis, enter in the pro category. We expect you to be honest about this.) People’s Choice: All entries from other categories may be submitted. Anyone may enter. This is a special award judged by the public. Schedule Registration is all day, beginning at 10 a.m. Please register all minis and hang on to the claim ticket we give you! 4:45 p.m. All entries must be completed and ready for judging. 5 p.m. Judging begins. You need not be present to win… but your mini does! Minis will then be placed in our chess case for People’s Choice Award. This will be voted on by the public (one vote per person—duh!) over the next week (March 25-31) and tallied April 2. Winners will be announced April 2. (Yes, you can vote for your own mini. Yes, kids can vote too—it ain’t the presidency.) Our fabulous Judges: 2012 Broadside Bash Award-winning Allan Pyle Golden Demon award-winner Bob Felix. (Subject to availability, but it looks good!) Judges’ decisions are final. These guys are pros and know what they’re looking for. The judges reserve the right to move an entry into a different category if they deem it appropriate. COA Clause: Once in our care, we will take special care of your minis, but we can accept no responsibility for loss or damage to individual entries. Models are entered into the competition at the artist’s own risk. If they come alive and fly around the store, we’ll talk later. Rules lawyers should talk to Desiree about rule changes BEFORE the tournament. Suggestions about future tournaments will be given consideration. This is Desiree’s first shot at it, so give her a break. If this topic should be moved to a different forum, no prob. This was my best guess!
  17. mcoyfrog

    USER PAINTED MINI'S

    Hey all.. I'm new to the site and new to pathfinders, I used to play DnD many years ago (man I'm getting old) Anyway I'm wondering, as I look thru all the mini's I want to buy I notice that there are a few that have options that show user painted mini's. The ones that have these extra pics are painted by some extremly talented painters. What I'm wondering is if we as reaper mini consumers could upload our own painted pieces of the mini and have it show up next to the ones that don't have any extra pics next to it, or have some kind of rotating images that show everyones art of that specific mini, of course if its from me it won't be the greatest but it would be kind of cool to see what others have painted on the same piece as you. I know about the show it off forum and love all the work there (such amazing talent here) but it would be really cool to see what others are doing with the specific mini you have sitting at your gaming table at home. Well, thanks for reading and maybe this idea already exists, if so let me know how/where to go. I look forward to meeting everyone here in the forums as the future becomes the present. Have a great day... Doug
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