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  1. So while I was shopping at Ral Partha Europe (not the same as Ral Partha), I spotted some figures from Das Schwarze Auge which looked kind of nice in an Old School sort of way. Das Schwarze Auge was apparently Germany's answer to D&D in the 1980s. It was (might still be) quite popular there. I don't know the history of the figures. This is Das Schwarze Auge 15500F, "Female Elf Ranger". I have been thinking of her as "Plains Elf". I started this figure a while back, keeping it at the back of my painting table and adding bits as I painted other things. All paints used are Golden Matte Fluid Acrylics. Color mixes are (usually) noted, but not exact ratios. Questions are welcomed and I will try to answer them. Critiques are appreciated. This is the way I usually start miniature figures: Lightly primed with Titanium White, then when that is dry, washing it over with Burnt Umber. Burnt Umber is a dark, transparent pigment that settles into crannies when thinned down and shows the details very well. It also gives a nice warm undertone to later paint layers. I already painted her face before I took a picture.
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