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  1. I painted these just a little while ago to match a client’s RPG party. They are all 3D prints from Heroforge, where you can choose from a wide array of options for characters. 3d printed minis present a bit of a challenge for painters, as the grain is often visible in a few spots. There are a variety of ways to overcome this, including sanding and gloss, but ultimately you just need to be very careful with your shading. For each of these, I got some pretty specific instructions on their color scheme. Here they are:
  2. And they* said 3D printing poses no threat to traditional miniatures... well maybe not yet, but still: There are a few more pics at my blog. This is a 3Dprint I printed out myself on my cheapo Flashforge Finder. Printed in PLA with .01 layer height. I scaled it a bit randomly to make a large one. The original model is by Axolote Gaming, an unexpected bonus item from their second Kickstarter, and also one of the better models of a Beholder I have seen yet. You can see the stepping from the printing process if you look closely. This is particularily obvious in the teeth and the eyeball as.the gloss varnish I used on the eye really made the stepping apparent. It was not half as bad before. At any rate, the stepping is really only apparent when looked at closely, or when magnified such as in the pictures. The fangs are a bit misshapen here and there, mostly from my printer not being all that great. I have not used a file when prepping, just clippers and a sharp hobby knife. Maybe a file would have straightened those teeth out properly. Something to try next time. The tentacles are hollow as their cross sections are to small to include any infill. This means they are quite brittle and prone to snappin off. Luckily only one of them broke during the removal of the supports though. My printer also left a lot of extremely fine hair-like strings attached to the finished print, so together with removing the print-supports there was quite a lot of prepwork. At least I did not have to wash it to get rid of the mould's release agents, as I have realized the truth: there is no mould. A note about painting 3D models: Neither drybrushing nor washes are good techniques for them, as the stepping will get accented and more pronounced. (and here I am with drybrushing and washes as my favorite techniques... argh!) I used a 50mm lipped base with a paperclip to make the stand. Beholder model by Axolote Gaming 3D printed at .01 layer height PLA 50mm base *They still being Tom Kirby CEO of Games Workshop in the 2014 GW Chairman’s Preamble to the Games Workshop CEO annual report.
  3. Live

    https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/ambionics-unique-prosthetics-as-seen-on-tv/ About Ambionics My name is Ben. I’ve been on an extraordinary journey over the past two years which started when my son was born. Sadly, Sol lost most of his lower left arm due to a blood clot following an injury at birth. I responded as any parent would have. I looked into how Sol would be treated and what support we could expect. I quickly learned that many toddlers abandon prosthetics early on and I wanted to know why so Sol would stand a better chance. Calling on my psychology background and my passion for engineering, I started doing my own research. I noticed big gaps in what was being offered and saw lost opportunities at several key stages. Rather than complain, I decided to do something about it and set up Ambionics. (Above) Dressing change at Alder Hey Children's Hospital post-amputation We deliver a totally new kind of online service and are currently developing unique functional prosthetic solutions (including our world famous hydraulic technology) for children with upper limb differences everywhere. Our first press release (March 1 this year) went viral. The response was truly out of this world and our story was covered in every Country and in every language. Most of the media attention centred on the hydraulic prototype we are working on. It's inspired by the way spiders use fluid to move their legs (to find out more please follow the press links below). However, there is much more to Ambionics besides this. Let me explain... Early Intervention Children are usually given their first prosthetic arm between 6 and 12 months of age. We introduce prosthetics much sooner - one month after an amputation (as in the case of my son) or from the moment a child with a limb difference arrives home from hospital. The director for innovation at NHS Wales described our research based approach as ‘potentially revolutionary’. Replace casting with scanning Normally parents must take time off work to attend appointments at specialist centres which might be hundreds of miles away from where they live. A prosthetist then creates a plaster cast mould of the affected arm and this is used to make a crude socket. Young children often find this stressful. They can wriggle and resist when the cast is taken and any sudden jerk can result in a poor fitting socket and a poor first experience of prosthetics. At Ambionics, parents simply scan their child’s arm while they are asleep then upload the file to our online platform. We do the rest and deliver the prosthetic through the postal service! Simple! It takes about five minutes to do the scan and 40 minutes for us to model a socket. It’s worth noting that within two years all phones and hand held devices will come with a scanning application built in. (above) The first 3D printed prototype, April 2016 5 Day Turn Around (compared to 6 - 11 weeks) A traditional prosthetic can take as long as 11 weeks to make. From a fresh scan, we can produce a new arm within a matter of hours Backup Copies If a traditional prosthetic is misplaced or damaged it can take five weeks to get an appointment for a re-mould, and another 11 weeks before the replacement arm arrives (that’s four months without an arm!). At Ambionics we just print another from the digital copy we keep. Reduced Waste Traditional prosthetics are discarded after use. To help keep costs down and reduce our carbon footprint, Ambionics only replace parts that need replacing or upgrading – this is usually just the detachable socket. Managing Growth Rates Traditionally, children receive two arms per year (based on NHS service) which means that for a lot of the time the socket is either too tight or too loose. Plaster cast arms are designed to be slightly oversized so children can grow into them. This is a false economy in our opinion because loose or unsecure arms and ones that are too tight don’t inspire confidence. It’s easy to see why so many children stop wearing them. We recommend at least four or five sockets per year depending on the needs of the child. Making Devices More Accessible In most cases, cosmetic arms are made of fibre glass coated in varnish with a functionless silicone hand (often described as creepy looking). These are surprisingly expensive for what they are! In the US, a cosmetic arm can cost as much as $5,000! Our knowledge of 3D printing and scanning has the potential to seriously reduce these costs, making prosthetics accessible to children everywhere (and anywhere!) We also believe in customising the look of the hand. We want to help break the stigma of 'cosmetic' prosthetic devices by offering bold colours and a choice of designs for infants. We even encourage older children to take part in the design process. What better way to meet a young person's needs than to enable them to produce their own assistive devices and accessories!
  4. Been working on a few big stompy robot designs since June, with an eye towards making my own independent faction for CAV, but also making them generic enough to be used elsewhere. This is the first one I've picked to work up fully as a ReaperCon entry, and be printable from a more-or-less standard 3D printer. The thing I've found is that curved shapes in the vertical axis really don't look that good. Too many "steps" as the shape is sliced into flat slivers. So, the trick was to print all the curves and other angled items along the plane of the print bed. Here's what the CAD looks like (PTC Creo Elements Direct Modeling Express 6.0). Each color is just making it visibly separate from the adjoining pieces, and doesn't mean anything once it is printed, as you can see all the blue pieces below. It's not all of the parts, since I forgot to take the picture of the other lower half. But, it is now all glued together, and some of the very flat parts were sanded smooth. I set out with the concept to also include some standard modelling items, so the barrel of the gun is a 5/32" (3.97mm) brass rod. I've got a couple of other ideas on some other little battle bots that use common items too... I just need to figure out what those common items could be. First shot shows the crewed side of the upper body. The gun itself is centered over the legs, and it is currently modeled in a split leg configuration. I've got it worked up that it can stand on two legs, as shown in the CAD render above. All that would need to be done is to swap out some short pegs that pin the joints together with some longer ones that go through both leg pieces, just for alignment and stability. Then here it is from the other side. This contains a fully decorative block of pieces, and the above shot shows a little block of deco as well. My intention is that should I keep making these, I can "upgrade" the later vehicles with missels, gun turrets, electronic suites, and other little fiddly bits. So this would equate to a Pre-Production Vehicle. Fully functional, but not something that'll be sent out and mass produced. One final shot to show the size comparison with a Spectre CAV that I've painted up before. I'm a little worried about how big of a base it'll have to be placed on, but then again, it's in a firing stance, and that's just how big it'll be. I've got the entire figure now drying from the slathering in acrylic gesso, which I'm using as part primer and part gap filler. Not something that would normally be used, but due to the nature of 3D printing, I believe it does well. I did do a couple test pieces back at the first of the month, and found a lot of modelling issues, but felt that the gesso worked rather well for what I wanted it to do. The plastic parts quite often had small gaps where it didn't fill in all the way, which I later changed in a couple small pieces to be 100% infilled internal spaces rather than the default 15%. I'll wait for everything to dry, then give it a good sanding. I might do a second coat as well, I'm not sure, but I really like how it came together. That is, once I got some epoxy glue that would actually work.
  5. https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/263291121/desktophero-free-3d-printable-character-maker?ref=nav_search
  6. Hello! This is my first post, and I am a complete noob at painting and miniatures. My friends have finally got me started on Pathfinder after trying for awhile, and I decided I needed to paint my own figure. It's kind of snowballing and I'm getting into other stuff. Anyway, I wanted to try painting a building, and I love new technology. So I decided to try a 3D printed building to help bring more flavor to the game. I started with a test build from the company Via Ludibunda, and wasn't impressed with the scale or the paintability from the hub I chose. I now have the Winterdale 2 Tavern from printablescenery.com. Their photo they use to sell it is thus: It looks nice. But obviously it was done with a more realistic bent to work with WWII wargaming. I tend to focus more on the fantasy aspect, and have decided to go in the style of Final Fantasy IX buildings. Like this: I got the model yesterday from Emeraldcitymaker.com(An on demand 3D printing company), and it turns out I'm missing a piece. The straw roof over the stable wasn't included with the packet I bought from printablescenery and am waiting for them to send it. In the meantime, I started with planning out the inside. This is the model put together with my Anirion figure. The yellow building on the right is the demo building I printed and painted from Via Ludibunda. I learned a lot doing it. PLA plastic soaks up paint like nobodys business. I had to do almost 5 coats of yellow to make the yellow stick. You absolutely do not want to put a light coating over a dark one, or you'll be painting for DAYS. Also, the size of the model is probably 25mm instead of 28mm, which means the figures look too large in it. The inside of the Tavern is the right size for the accessories I bought. So I figured I could go ahead and paint it and bring it to one of my friends' pathfinder nights later in the next couple weeks. ...Which brings us to the current state. I love the red shingles, but I'm afraid to add a wash now because I don't want to darken the bright red color. I dislike the work I did on the flagstone bottom. I followed that excellent flagstone styrofoam guide on this site, but the principals of PLA 3D print worked against me. Because a 3D printed object is done in layers, those layers are present on the model. Whenever you do a wash, the wash goes inbetween the layers and sticks out. This model is printed in such a way to minimize the effect, but when I tried to wash the stones they just soaked it up and made the ridges more visible. Hints and tricks are greatly appreciated. I was hoping someone could help me "fix" the stones to make them a little less "standoutish." I was thinking of just doing a black wash with MSP black to tone down the brighter colors a bit, but am worried about the ridges showing up again. I have been kind of hurrying with it too because I wanted to get it game ready in case they decided to do game night soon. Any other general tips would be appreciated too.
  7. Not quite sure where to put this, but I wanna show them off, and sculpting seems most appropriate. Here's a set of Land Raider doors I've sculpted (virtually, at least) and sent to Shapeways to have 3D printed in ultra fine detail plastic. Some day, I'll even finish painting the Land Raider itself. It's only taken me eleven years to get this far. As they arrived: With base coat and in place on the original model as proof of fitting: With final paint:
  8. Hello, all. I recently got in a 3d printer, and decided that I'd play around with it to see what I could print. After a lot of heartache trying to get a small print to work, I switched over to something on the other end of the scale - and I have to say, I'm quite pleased with how it came out! A small bust of Groot, painted up to look nice. Took about 17 hours to print, then another hour to paint (haven't sealed it up yet). So, enjoy - and C&C always welcome.
  9. I have been working on a project in blender, and could use some criticism. Unfortunately, I haven't converted this to a JPEG, but I will change it out as soon as it is possible. One of the things that is horrible with sculpting in 3d is that the details can become faded or nonexistent when the print is made, but with a 16 micron resolution almost all of the details you see should make it. The head is missing right now, and the arms and hands are just being set up for general shape before I can get into detail work. Some armor doesn't have support behind it if you look closely. I am sorry if this should have gone in sculpting, if so I would appreciate if a mod would move it.