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Found 5 results

  1. So, after a lot of thought, research, and discussion, my wife and I have decided to purchase a lost-wax casting system. Essentially this is a system for casting any metal with a melting point below 2000 deg F into jewelry, minis, etc. Unlike the spin casting used by companies like Reaper, this will be low volume with only 10 to 50 pieces a day possible. I should note right away, that I do not intend at this time to go into minis production/sales on my own. So what do I intend to do with it: Make jewelry for my wife and our business. Eventually (10+ years), we would like to get into producing our own line of gold and silver jewelry and become seasonal vendors at various Ren Fairs as a retirement career once the kids are out of college. Of course this is a long term goal and won't happen for a long time yet. I'll practice on copper and pewter first. Make rings for our sister parish in Haiti. Due to various cultural reasons, most Haitians won't get married until they have a pair of rings. This can be very hard for some of the poorer people, so they just stay apart and don't get married. My wife can by old jewelry under value and I'll be able to melt them down and make them new rings and send them down to them as they need it. (We've been giving them the rings she finds, but this way we will be able to cast them in the shapes and sizes they actually need/want.) Make armatures for my sculpts. I spend a lot of time resculpting skulls and basic forms because I have to start from scratch. This will allow me to make a library of animal armatures and other stuff to speed up my sculpting. Also, I will be able to produce better sculpts by being able to control how much and what type of metal is in the armature. I don't ever want to send Reaper another piece of furniture that warps on the mold again (bookcase, I'm looking at you). For sculpts I can't/don't want to sell, I'll be able to make copies for my friends and I (maybe even some goodies for things like the BOGW ). I'm sure I'll think up other uses as I get more skilled at it. I started reading, studying, and taking some classes on the subject in the past few years. I'm at a point where the only way forward is to take the plunge and buy the equipment so I can begin practicing and learning for real. My finances are at a good spot for it now, so I took the plunge and ordered a kit from Gesswein. The following equipment is on its way: Rubber mold vulcanizer (small single figure version of what Reaper uses) Wax injector (for making wax copies in the rubber molds) Burnout oven (for baking the wax copies out of the molds before casting) Vacuum casting machine (for removing air from the molds and later pulling the metal into the molds during casting) Flasks, investment, wax bits, rubber, and lots of other materials needed. Here is a picture of the kit I bought: I won't be able to just jump in and start casting right away. I still will need to get a method of melting the metal (either a torch or an electric furnace). I'll also need to rework my basement studio with new benches, electrical outlets, and venting to make it safe, which is where this thread comes in, as I thought you all might be interested in this, so I plan on documenting everything here, from the unboxing, to the building, to the first cast piece. I'm very very excited! Andy
  2. Bob in the role as Tim The Enchanter. I saw parts of the movies, seeing Bob throwing fire around and knew I need a Fireball for him. :-) Small Fireball Tutorial: 01. Get a ~0,65mm needle and glue a small plastic bead on it. Some have balls at the end. 02. For the fire around the needle and the ball I used a small hotgluegun trying not to get a to smoothed surface. 03. After the hotglue was cold I tried with the hot a more uneaven surface on the hotglue, again. 04. I drilled a 0,65mm hole in the hand. (better use a hand drilling tool, not a machine!) 05. Bended the needle a little bit 06. used 2-epoxy-glue to glue it in the hand 07. to make it sure it does not change the position I put the fireball on something. 08. painted it white 09. painted it yellow 10. painted it orange 11. painted it red while orange is wet 12. painted it black on the jet near the hand while orange and red are wet
  3. Note: This was not inspired by anything I bought from Reaper, but another company. Note also: Sculpting and casting is not my art. It is entirely possible that I am being thoroughly ignorant about this and it is already a solved problem. *** Occasionally one will run into a miniature in a particular pose popular at the moment, with two arms stretched straight out front, generally holding long range combat weapons. In such cases it seems to be pretty common to cast the arms as separate pieces to be attached to the rest of the model at the shoulders. This is, I gather, is because of the nature of moldmaking. Pieces seem to need to be not too far from flat to release from the mold properly, so a complex shape is often broken down into simpler shapes to be assembled after molding. But casting the arms separately makes for a very difficult and delicate attaching job, involving balance and cussing and tiny drills and wire (and that last is especially difficult if the figure is, say, a woman with tiny, thin arms). This results in a fragile miniature, difficult to handle and play with. This strikes me as inefficient. Surely there are better ways to put together a human figure. May I suggest a different way of thinking about dividing up the figure for molding? The problem here is the arms, which are long, thin, horizontal structures with only a single attachment point which needs to bear their weight and any stress put on them from handling. But what if they had built-in support? If a figure in that pose were composed of two pieces, one the body from the armpits down and one the head, shoulders, and arm assembly, it seems to me it would be less fiddly and more sturdy. If the arms and head were a single piece it would still be relatively flat for casting, something of a flat "U" shape, but it seems to me it would be much easier to glue and structurally much stronger than separate arms are. *** (Note again, sculpture and casting are not my arts. Am I being naive here? Would the difficulty of dividing up the sculpture and the possibility of weirdly placed gaps outweight the convenience and stability?)
  4. And here's the little Partha figure I finished. I've always enjoyed these teeny weeny figures (back when 25mm really meant something), and this is one of Dennis Mize's old Children of the Night figures, probably sculpted around 1979. As I mentioned in the post with the Stonehaven elves, I am really happy I discovered a button that brings the color back into my crappy photographs with the editing software. I've got my other little Partha Wizard I'm working on, as well as another Stonehaven elf.
  5. Hi everyone, Here are the first pictures of a Throne Base I've been working on lately. I wish to use this same base to display different models. So, I'll be casting resin models out of the original model I'm creating. After the silicon mold is made, I want to cast a copy to use it as a base for my Cinder. Then, I'll cast some more throne base for the Swine Prince, Van Storme the Vampire and so on. The tiles are one inch wide, to suit regular miniatures bases. So, the top surface of the base will be 3 x 4 inch and about 7/8 inch high. The peice of wood I'm using was not totaly parallel and wide enough. I had to fill one side with Milliput. I screwed a stick on the plank to help fill the gap and hold the putty in place. I hope you'll enjoy and it will be useful for some of you. I'll be glad to receive your comments and learn your personal tricks on the subject.