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Found 6 results

  1. Second last model for the Foorians and Miniotaur I posted earlier in the forum. Ocean themed with green and blues for the skin. It's another Confrontation model, and again done with very little blending. Mostly glazing and feathering for a fast turn-around. This one took yesterday afternoon - around 4 1/2 hours. I also have no idea what model this is. If anyone does, let me know! Thanks for the info Xherman!
  2. Another Foorian from Confrontation for a client wanting these models in a ocean theme. This one went really quick - 5 hours start to finish with lots of glazes and feathering. Very little blending used here at all.
  3. EDITED: I tried to fix the pics since the originals were on photobucket. Apologies if they're a bit off! Ok, face painters! Have you always wondered how to get nice smooth skin blend? I'm going to do my best to take you step by step through a face. I could probably be persuaded to also move on to other skin areas, but let's start simple. Now, while snapping photos I realized this blending is not going to be as neat and clean as I usually like it because the photoing process did interfere with a few layers. But, we'll get it smooth in the end! Are you ready?! First things first: A large model, to better illustrate what we're doing! And our materials. We have Yephima, cloud giantess, a W&N #2, and RMS paint! I used fair skin as my flesh color, and I'm going to shade with porcelain rose and spattered crimson and highlight with pure white. This should give us a nice warm flesh tone. I'll also use walnut brown on the eyes. After snapping this, I also realized I wanted blue eyes- so I added ashen blue for the iris. Porcelain is a retired color. You can sub punk rock pink or just mix spattered with white and it'll work just fine. But I had it, and I like it, and if I keep using it, maybe reaper will bring it back! 1. Step 1: basecoat the face with fair skin. Hey! My model has a little face blemish! Oh no! What can I do to fix this? Never fear, face painters! Just take a little bit of brush-on sealer and cover the blemish with a nice layer, and it will smooth out. You can then put another layer of basecoat on top. I did a total of 3 layers of flesh, mainly because I forgot to wash this model and I had some adherence issues on the chest. 2. Step 2: The eyes! Line with walnut. Doesn't have to be perfect. You can always touch up with flesh. Paint the sclera white. Pure white probably isn't as good as linen or leather white, but I'm trying to limit our palette. Add the iris- ashen blue, as you can see. Here's where we pick the direction of gaze and try to make the eye "look" in the same direction. Takes some practice to figure our what works and what you like. Again, if paint goes where you don't want it, just touch up. Hmmn... I could have sworn I took one with just the blue... at any rater, after the blue is down add the walnut brown pupil. Then dot the pupil with white. Sorry, that back eye is hard to see. Usually there's an easy eye and a hard eye. Some people start with the hard eye. I start with the easy eye, so at least one will look the way I want! 3. Step 3: Breathe. Don't forget to breath again now that the eyes are done! 4. Step 4: Shading. This is a lot messier because I'm pausing to photo- sorry! First I lay down a thin glaze of spattered crimson all the way to the edge of the walnut, then clean the brush and just smooth the edge out using a damp brush and some feathering type strokes. Thin is better. See how nice and translucent this layer is? You can easily see the flesh underneath. I went back in with a thin glaze of my flesh to reclaim some of that cheekbone from the shadow. Then proceeded to put some crimson on the side of the nose and smooth it out. I really tried to catch each specific step. But- you can see how thin the layer is, then how it smooths with a damp brush. I usually do a few layers of this and reclaim my flesh with a thin glaze if I feel I have too much shadow tone. The crimson will mesh nicely with the walnut so that it looks like she has nice intense Maybelline lashes! Er- probably don't want quite this much contrast with a male face. If I were doing this on a male model, I'd pick something like ruddy brown to line the eyes. More soon!
  4. I spend less than 2 hours on this guy. He was the practice mini in James Wappel's Advanced Glazing class at ReaperCon this year. The brush that is pictured is the brush used to paint him. Wappel likes using cheap craft brushes since they are affordable and since he gave one that is what I used. This fellow was based and primed whitish by Wappel before class and we spend the class mostly applying glazes or glazes mixed with some thicker colors for things like spots. It was a lot of fun. For those interested in the base, Wappel has a blog post with the process. He also has two posts showing his process on the example minis that he prepainted for the class.
  5. Adrift

    D&D Chainmail Ogre Trooper

    Angry female ogre..nuff said. This miniature was entirely painted, as all my figures are with a Round #1 brush from Reaper and Reaper MSP. I've dedicated myself to steadily improving my glazing practices throughout the year and this is making me feel like I'm getting somewhere. As with all my painting, none of the shading or highlighting you see is a result of photography. The paints I used: Ultramarine shadow, blue liner, tanned leather, auburn shadow, burgundy wine (a new favorite), misty grey, dark elf skin, woodstain brown, earth brown, blackened brown, brains pink, driftwood brown, fresh blood, vampiric shadow, splintered bone, dirty bone, ruddy leather. Since I'm terrible at WIP threads I thought I would include a synopsis of the painting of the skin: The ogre got a base-coat of ultramarine shadow Wash of blue liner, emphasis on the "darker" areas 2 glazes of a color combo of (2 brains pink: 3 driftwood brown) Blue liner wash 1 glaze of burgundy wine 1 highlighting glaze of (1 brains pink: 1 driftwood brown...6 drops of water added to that mix) 1 highlighting glaze of the above with burgundy wine added to blend 1 glaze of the above with fresh blood and brains pink added 1 glaze of the above with vampiric shadow added 1 glaze of (1 brains pink: 1 splintered bone) 2 glazes of 1:1:1 of brains pink, burgundy wine, driftwood brown I hope you like what I've done but I'm always open to C&C and any thoughts on improvement.
  6. I'm doing some shading on my current mini with some MSP Burgundy Wine. I have it really thinned down to about 1:10 paint:water. After several passes I noticed it started to get a chalky appearance. I used the same color as a base coat on another part of the mini with about three coats and had no problem there. It was only when I thinned it out to glaze that it started to chalk up. What am I doing wrong and is there a way to correct it? Thanks!
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