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Found 3 results

  1. Redshirts - Adventures In Absurdity

    Ending in four days - Redshirts: Adventures in Absurdity Sometimes the greatest adventure in space is simply surviving the orders of your captain. Redshirts brings laughs to your gaming table Sounds like fun - I am in for $10 - with no real intent of ever running the beastie. A short adventure series, covering levels 1 - 3. Mission 1: The Terrible Tacos: When Captain Ginny wakes up after a weekend bender with an intense craving for tacos, she decides to send her newly arrived recruits on their first mission. Unfortunately for the recruits, the local Taco Galaxy is under deadly new management. Mission 2: The Cheaper Cleaner: Stuck in a surveillance mission around a dying star, first officer Laisse Faire decides to save a few credits and send the PCs to pick up his dry cleaning instead of paying for delivery. He's sure the quarantine around the planet won't be a problem. Mission 3: The Pirate Bonanza: When several important pieces of the ship's engine go missing, the PCs are sent shopping at the local space pirate flea market with a budget of $0 and the Captain expecting change back. Can the PCs get the ship back in working order or will they end up swabbing the decks of a pirate ship for the rest of their days? You are the away team for an incompetent captain, on a less than stellar starship. Reminds me more of the old SF classic(?) Quark than Star Trek... The Auld Grump
  2. https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/froggodgames/frog-god-games-starfinder-roleplaying-game-compati?ref=category_newest About this project Space is about to get serious.... Frog God Games is known for its lethal adventures and fantastic places. Our iconic treks have sent vast numbers of players down to face dark adversaries beyond the reach of the sun. Fighting,dying and fighting again they have faced the blackest pits of a Demon's abyss. Well, where else can we find new challenges? May we suggest the first step is looking up? The Starfinder Roleplaying Game Paizo, the powers behind the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, are completing the final system check on the highly anticipated release of The Starfinder Roleplaying Game. Based on the robust, yet familiar The Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, The Starfinder Roleplaying Game will be taking fans of The Pathfinder Roleplaying Game forward in time and to the edge of space where familiar races, powers and creatures have been unleashed. Now beyond the bounds of their home world they traverse and expand into the dark reaches. Where cryptic cultures, xenomorphic horrors, and merciless enemies are scattered across alien worlds. New technologies, arcana and untapped alien arcana can be discovered in the vastness of space. Which is where we come in... Science Fantasy Frog God Style Frog God Games is pleased to present to you its Starfinder Roleplaying Game Compatible Line, which, with your help, will release alongside Paizo's highly anticipated Starfinder Roleplaying Game: Core Rulebook ™ (expected August 2017). Frog God Games is pleased to present to you its Starfinder Compatible Line, which, with your help, will release alongside the core Starfinder rules (expected August 2017). We have seen the rules and are very excited to be supporting Paizo's foray into Science Fantasy. The Starfinder Roleplaying Game compatible releases from Frog God Games consists of 2 Full-Color, 8.5 x 11 Hardcover Books: The Planetarium and the Tome of Aliens and a folio of six poster maps all available in both print and PDF format. Planetarium Where to land? Presented in full-color, Frog God's Planetarium contains over a dozen new worlds filled with creatures, cultures and civilizations. Apex lifeforms, post-apocalyptic undead, and extraplanar dragons are found within these pages. All for your use as settings with built-in adventure seeds ready for the Starfinder Roleplaying Game campaigns you will be enjoying soon. Need an ocean world? A high-tech planet? How about unexpected destinations like comets or gas giants? Detailed write ups of those and more are included in the Planetarium. Full color art and cartography for each planet (when appropriate) are provided by the talents of Alyssa Faden, Terry Pavlet, and Colin Chan. Tome of Aliens Space may be cold but no player is going to feel lonely? Not with the Aliens coming from Frog God. This full-color book contains over 120 creatures for the Starfinder Roleplaying Game your alien needs will be satisfied. Each one is designed threaten your party using a similar creature creation philosophy to all of our popular fantasy products (basically, when in doubt lean toward scarier and hungrier). The full color art was commissioned from outstanding artists gauranteeing the production values will be worthy of the quality beasts, sentients and, others dreamed up by our authors. The Tome of Aliens will be out of this world. With your help it can get even better.
  3. Science Fiction RPGs?

    So I hear Paizo's got this new game, Starfinder, up and coming. And I am not sure what to think. Pathfinder filled a need; I tried 4th Edition D&D, and did not much care for the radical changes after several years of 3.5. Pathfinder was just an extension of the d20 system, and worked well as a generic fantasy game ... that, as splatbook after splatbook and so forth, grew steadily less generic. Still a fine game, although it begins to show signs of splatcreak*, as the sheer amount of rules pile up. Makes sense they'd want to expand their base of gaming; a one-game company is vulnerable to changes in the market, and D&D has finally gotten its head on straight. Time to seek out new life and civilizations... if only to stay competitive. But I dunno. First science fiction RPG I ever played was Traveller, which did an amazing job of distilling the basics down to three little booklets in a box, which seems to be how things were done, then. We had combat, we had spaceships, we had computers, find a ship, find a crew, find a job, keep flying. It worked. (I will not discuss Gamma World or Metamorphosis Alpha; while I enjoyed 'em, these were more postapocalyptic and less space opera, and this is hard enough to keep on track as it is). Another game, Space Opera, was interesting and fun, although waaaay too in love with its rulesset; as I recall, you could burn a whole gaming session just creating a character. Which I guess was a little better than Traveller, where you could accidentally get killed before your character entered PLAY, but Space Opera's extra crunchy rules were a bit much, even for the times. I enjoyed Star Frontiers, once TSR finally got off their duffs and designed a neat space opera setting, although I took it kinda personally that they did not include a starship design or purchase system, or for that matter much of any information about space travel other than "buy a ticket." What, Traveller could do it, but you can't? They were up front enough, though, about the fact that they'd be out with a separate boxed set that would include the starship rules... eventually. And they did. Aaaand that's where we take a sharp left, because Star Frontiers was the last generic science fiction space opera I ever played. FASA quickly came out with a licensed Star Trek game, set during the TOS era, because that's all we had back then; Next Generation was still years away. Still remember the one adventure we played as Klingon officers, who wound up blowing up the ship due to a complex web of backstabbery... but I digress. Not long after that, they also came out with a licensed Doctor Who game, which preoccupied us for a while, as there were a hell of a lot of VHS tapes to track down to keep up with the setting! It did have the advantage of spreading across all TIME, as well as space... although we took a break when West End Games's Star Wars came out, because to a nerd-child of the seventies, the history of mankind breaks down into pre-SW and post-SW. After all, you never saw any Planet Of The Apes RPGs, did you? Hell, I still have a copy of Leading Edge's Aliens RPG around here somewhere; it was fun, albeit rather sketchy, as it was based entirely on the two movies in the Alien franchise as of 1988... had plenty of information about Weyland-Yutani, the Space Marines, the Aliens... and nearly nothing else... Which brings us to now. As I said above, Pathfinder filled a need. But there are a great many licensed science fiction games now. Firefly is still going strong. A new Star Wars game still circulates, albeit unsupported due to licensing. A new Star Trek game is in the works, assuming its maker ever gets it out of playtesting, and the current Doctor Who game still seems to be selling. Is there a place now for a generic science fiction setting? Will it appeal to people who've never tried Pathfinder? Or does the current market favor established licensed science fiction settings where one can watch a movie or three and get an idea INSTANTLY about the world and how it works? Opinions? Ideas? Rants?
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