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  1. This is Reaper's 59009: Mad Scientist, sculpted by Bob Ridolfi. I thank Reaper for proffering Victorian Science Ladies in Big Dresses, and I am looking forward to painting her up. I am, as usual, working with Golden matte fluid acrylic paints. This is my standard priming, a thin wash of thinned-down Titanium White allowed to dry for a day then washed further with thinned-down Burnt Umber. I don't know if I've mentioned, but this is a classic Italian Renaissance priming technique. I can't remember the term, but it translates as "veil" of color and is supposed to give richness to subsequent layers of color. In this case it also makes details pop. I clearly missed a few spots with the Burnt Umber. I will be repairing those as I go along. I started with her skin. I like the Foglios' "Girl Genius" comic, so she is a little inspired by them. They have plenty of diversity in their cast, and I thought this figure might look well with darker skin. I have found that Burnt Umber, a slightly cool, rich dark brown, makes a good basis for dark human skin. This is the first layer, a light scumble (like a glaze but using a lighter color over a darker instead of vice versa) of Burnt Umber lightened just a touch with Titanium White. Dark skin, I find, looks well with warm highlights based on Yellow Ochre. I painted her skin quite dark, so I made the highlights a little cooler, less Yellow Ochre and more Titanium White, admixed with Burnt Umber. Here she is with her skin finished and her eyes painted in. I washed some clear Quinacridone Magenta over her lips. Her eyes were pretty enormous to begin with and I made them even larger. I am thinking mauve for her dress. Purple ftw!
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