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Found 2555 results

  1. Metalchaos

    77178, Fire Giant Warrior

    Good day everyone, this was my entry in Reaper's Facebook Paint Your Giant contest. 77178, Fire Giant Warrior, Dark Heaven Bones model sculpted by Jason Wiebe. It is mounted on a 74027, Ruins Vignette Base, a resin base sculpted by Patrick Keith. This model is huge, 7cm high and 13cm wide with the sword. I did some minor conversion on it. A heavy thundering sound come crushing down the ruined hall. You see orange and red lights dancing between the pillar supporting the stone roof. In the glimpse of a moment, all hell break loose as a dark skin colossus burst from the rubbles wielding a towering incandescent blade. He lands next to you smashing the large tiles of the floor. You are paralyzed in fear as he turns gazing in your direction with fire in his eyes. Desperate, you wonder if you've gone too far exploring this ancient Undermountain realm.
  2. Weird-O

    77244 Skeleton Warrior Spearmen

    For my upcoming Dragon Age campaign. I thought they looked like they need to pee, but a buddy elsewhere described them as Bone Strippers, and now I can't unsee that.
  3. Weird-O

    77441 Ostarzha, Elf Cleric

    Painted up as a Chantry Sister for an upcoming Dragon Age campaign.
  4. Darcstaar

    77106 BONES Frost Giant Jarl

    This was my entry for the Reaper Fan Facebook Page Paint Your Giants Contest. This is the biggest thing I ever painted not on a canvas. The last time I entered one of these, I felt like it would have done better if the base told more of a story, so that is what I tried to achieve with this one. I wanted it to portray REVENGE! The Jarl had his left eye gouged out by a young upstart white dragon. He healed, regrouped, and hunted down the dragon to enact his revenge. I hope you like it. The final results have now been posted. He placed 4th behind some mind-blowing work. I wanted some orange on the model to play against the blue skin, for color theory. Originally, it was going to be glowing runes on the rock and skulls, but I abandoned that for the sake of time/completion. I settled with orange tones in the leather. I wasn't really sure how to get the TMM of the crown to look like a gouge, or how to make his blue skin look like a scar. I'm not entirely sold on the result, but I'm sure I'll try again some day on a different model. The Monster Manual suggests blue skin with white/gray/dirty blonde hair is the usual coloration. I tried to go to full white for the highlights of the face to make it the focal point. I wanted him to look like he was wearing a polar bear pelt, and that all the fur trim was also polar bear. I tried to make it look a little muddy on the bottom, and on his shoes. This was how I wanted to weather the inside of the bear skin, to make it look like it had that dried cracked appearance. Not sure how well it shows up in the picture. These were some WIP shots. The black and white was to figure out how to highlight the sword. I wanted the sword and stone items to look like shiny flint. I hit the sword and most of the other stone items with high gloss varnish to help sell the effect. The front and back of the sword. Finally, some more details of the base and the white dragon victim. I wanted to base the dragon as a purple in the recesses, similar to the effect going on on the cover of Hoard of the Dragon Queen module. This was the BONES Temple Dragon I sacrificed. He is smaller, but his tongue sticks out perfectly to sell the dead dragon effect. And he's not as expensive to replace as Deathsleet! I pained his eyes half-rolled into his head to complete the idea. I tried to freehand some anatomy on there: vertebral body, muscle groups, esophagus, carotid arteries/jugular veins. I also tried to be accurate with the blood spray coming from both arteries, and didn't want to go too crazy with the gore. Finally, I wanted it to look like his hot blood had melted some of the snow. Overall, this was a wild ride. The early part of the contest saw him at #2. Then he gave up some ground and sat at #3 for a long time. Then another Frost Giant (Queen) made a great surge at the end to unseat me out of #3 into 4th place. To be honest, there were so many awesome paint jobs, I'm just humbled and honored to be in the top 20. Thanks for looking. C&C Welcome.
  5. Cygnwulf

    Viridus - Autumn Monarch

    Everyone, meet Viridius. He's a hefty boi. No Ma'al or Kalladrax, but still pretty big. He doesn't even fit in my light box, as you can see. I've thought a long time about how I was going to paint him up, I don't think I'm going to go with the standard green dragon look. Instead I'm going to take my inspiration from the time of year, and make him an autumn forest dragon, whose coloration changes with the forest around him. So I'll be doing him in mostly golden yellows to oranges and reds, but keeping some greenish tones as the base of scales and other places, to kind of give a reminder of the verdent glory he was before. One thing I'm choosing to see as an opportunity is that the tops of his wings are very smooth, ideal for some freehand work. The question is, what to do? Some kind of leaf like pattern, or perhaps a butterfly like eye pattern (in the leaf colors, of course) Out of the box bag he was in pretty good shape. The usual mold line cleanup, though he has some gaps that will need to be filled. I followed up with reshaping the wings a little with some boiling water. I forgot to get a complete before picture, but below you can see the before and after for the right wing I've had to fully assemble him, I don't like the way the wing joins look without greenstuff, so that's going to be the first order of business. So painting around the wings might be a chore, but it's nothing I haven't dealt with before (Although, not in recent history) I begain the gapfill on the right side, but after sticking a finger in greenstuff twice and having to flip him back to touch up the texture, I decided to call it a night and do the left side gaps later.
  6. After 6 months of painting 4-10 hours a week on this monster, I am finally finished with Reaper Bones Ma'al Drakar 77580. WIP Here: http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/78573-citrine-tries-to-tackle-maaldrakar-77580/&tab=comments#comment-1668344
  7. wickedshifty

    Earth Elemental

    Large earth elemental- he has moss for armpit hair :)
  8. I put together a few documents related to using Bones. I've submitted these to the Craft section of the website, but as it may be a little while before Reaper has the time available to add them, Bryan suggested that I post them here. Bones - Frequently Asked Questions Bones - Preparation (mould line removal, glue, putty, etc.) Bones - The First Coat is the Difference (this document) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Painting Bones Miniatures: The First Coat is the Difference One of the revolutionary features of Bones miniatures is that you can paint them straight out of the package. Because this is such a departure from recommendations for painting metal or resin miniatures, it is understandable that this feature raises questions and concerns for painters unfamiliar with Bones. Painters familiar with other types of miniatures will find that there are some differences in how the first coat of paint behaves, or that there are painting techniques or substances that require a little tweaking to use as a first coat on Bones figures. The Bones material is a little hydrophobic, meaning that it tends to repel water. Paint diluted with water, sometimes even just a little water, may display a tendency to bead up or pull away from crevices or higher raised areas. The more water added to the paint, the greater this effect. The first coat of paint applied to the surface can also take a little longer to dry than usual. The image on the left is a Bones figure straight out of the blister, the one on the right is a primed Dark Heaven metal miniature. Each was painted with a brushstroke of Master Series Walnut Brown paint of various dilutions. From right to left: undiluted; 1:1 paint water ratio; heavily diluted. On the Bones figure, the stripes painted with diluted paint display beading and pulling away, but the stripe painted with undiluted paint covers smoothly with clean edges. Once you apply a first coat of paint, primer or other appropriate surface preparation to a Bones miniature, you can freely use paint of any dilution and the full array of painting techniques! Painters who prefer to use thinned base coats, those who like to start with a dark wash over white primer, and those who use black or custom coloured primer need not despair! The following information will help you find ways to tweak your preferred techniques to work with the Bones material. It also includes information about brands of primer, paint and other substances that are known to work or not work well with Bones, and tests of the utility and durability of certain of these products on Bones. Slightly Thicker Paint Will Not Obscure All the Sculpted Details For years painters have been reading tips and tutorials that exhort them to thin their paints so as not to obscure the detail sculpted into their figures, and to obtain a better quality paint job. While it’s definitely the case that using excessively thick paint can affect detail and paint quality, I think it is also true that some people are worrying too much about this in regards to painting Bones. Reaper Master Series and Master Series HD are produced with a consistency pretty close to ideal for base coats. Several other miniature paint lines are produced in a similar consistency, or require only a small amount of water to reach the correct consistency. Two or three layers of such paint will not clog up all the detail on your model. Also, remember that when you paint metal or resin miniatures, you normally paint over a coat of primer. One layer of undiluted paint on a Bones miniature is equivalent in thickness (if not thinner) than one or two coats of primer on a metal or resin figure. The picture above is of four Bones bases. The tiny text relief sculpted into the bottom of these is a perfect way to test whether paint coats obscure small detail. Each of these bases was given four coats of a substance, and then brushed over with a paint wash to bring out the detail. (The bottles of paint and primer used in this test were fairly fresh, no more than a year or two old.) From left to right, the bases were coated with four coats of undiluted Master Series Pure White, four coats of undiluted Master Series White Primer, and four coats of undiluted Master Series Brush-On Sealer. I prepared a second base with the Brush-On Sealer as the wash didn’t quite turn out on the first. The word ‘Miniatures’ has lost a little detail on the base coated with four undiluted coats of paint, but apart from that both it and the primer coated base still have excellent detail. The text is still mostly legible on the bases coated with Brush-On Sealer, but some detail has been obscured. Wash Bones Figures Before Painting Many people find that the paint is less likely to bead up if the figure has been washed. Also, if you’ve had your figure out of the blister for a while, or you’ve handled it to remove mould lines or otherwise prepare it, you should clean it before painting, as it probably has dust and skin oils on it that may repel paint or cause paint to chip off after it has dried. All you need to clean it is some dishwashing liquid and an old toothbrush. Give it a scrub, and then rinse it really well to get off all the soap. Let it dry before painting. (You can hurry up the drying with a hairdryer set on low.) Black Primer? Custom Colours? Paint One Coat of Paint over the Entire Figure First! Some painters prefer to paint over black or gray primer. Others start with a primer of a particular colour to speed up painting units. For example, you could paint a coat of khaki on a unit of modern army figures and be half way finished painting their uniforms. One way to get the same effect as a dark wash over white primer on Bones is to first apply an all-over coat of white paint, followed by a dark wash. (Keep reading for other ways to do washes directly on Bones.) Some Primers Work on Bones Traditional metal or resin miniatures need to be primed before any paint is applied. Paint applied over bare metal does not adhere well, and rubs off with even light handling. Primer etches into the metal on a microscopic level. Paint adheres well to primer, so using it forms a stronger bond. Bones figures do not suffer from this issue! Acrylic paint painted directly onto the Bones surface is as durable, if not more durable, than if you use paint over primer on Bones. If you still prefer to use primer, Reaper’s Brush-On Primer works well on Bones, and is available in black and white. Another product people sometimes ask about is gesso. Fine arts painters use gesso to prepare canvases for painting. Some people have experimented with liquid gesso as a primer for miniatures, Bones and otherwise. People have reported it working in terms of creating a surface that you can paint thinned paint over. Reports vary as to how durable the material is, so it may not be the best choice for miniatures that are going to be handled. For those who prefer to use spray primer, the best option is to use an airbrush to apply a coat of acrylic paint to the Bones figure. Reaper Master Series paint thins well with Golden or Liquitex Airbrush Medium, and maintains its strong adhesion, though I have found that adding airbrush medium does noticeably increase the drying time of the paint. Aerosol spray primers and some spray paints can have some issues with Bones (and with other plastics). The chemicals in some of these primers and paints do not react well with Bones. The main effect seems to be that the primer never completely cures, remaining tacky to the touch. Some will also fail to form a bond with the Bones material. The following is a list of aerosol paints and primers that people on the Reaper forums have reported testing on Bones. Please consider the list just a guide. The best idea is to test your chosen spray by using it on a small Bones figure you don’t care about a lot. After you give the spray time to cure, carefully look over the figure to make sure the chemicals in the spray haven’t reacted with the Bones material to melt or otherwise damage it. If not, test the primer surface by touching it to see if it stays too tacky to paint over. Also, flex parts of the figure to make sure the primer doesn’t crack. Note: Some people have successfully used Krylon primer, and possibly other spray primers that some people have reported as problematic. And other people have reported problems with primers that some felt worked well. One difference seems to be that a light spray rather than a heavy coating is more likely to minimize tackiness. Environmental factors such as temperature and humidity are also always a big variable with any spray product. Recommended aerosol spray primers and paints: Army Painter white and coloured primers Krylon Dual Paint + Primer Duplicolor Sandable – slight tackiness possible Rust-oleam Painter’s Touch Ultra Cover 2x – slight tackiness possible Problem aerosol spray primers and paints: Krylon white primer – doesn’t bond, stays tacky Testors Enamel flat black – stays tacky Walmart Valu flat white – stays tacky Krylon Primer red-brown – stays tacky Citadel spray Use a Medium to Thin Your Paint or Make a Wash Water is the element in thinned paint that causes it to bead up on the Bones surface. If you try thinning your paint with a dilutant other than water, you may be able to create a mix that is closer to the consistency you like to paint with. Depending on what you use, you can even create something translucent enough to act as a wash or glaze directly on the Bones. Mediums designed to work with acrylic paints are good products to try. Examples are matte medium, glazing medium, airbrush medium. Reaper’s Brush-On Sealer can be used this way. Note that many of these products are a little less fluid than water, so they may not dramatically change the consistency of the paint (it’ll still feel a little thick rather than watery, but it will look a lot more transparent). You can also test adding just a drop or so of water to your mix of paint and medium to see if you can get closer to the consistency you prefer. I diluted some Master Series Bone Shadow with various mediums to make washes. From left to right, the products are listed below. Master Series Brush-On Sealer: I added one drop of water to a large drop of paint and several drops of Sealer. Worked well. Liquitex Matte Medium: A thick product. I added a drop of water. Beads up too much to work well for a wash. Liquitex Glazing Medium: Another thick product, I added a drop of water to my mix. Took longer to dry than the others. Did not sit in crevices well enough to work well for a wash. Very shiny finish. Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium: Applied well, dried quickly. Even application of the colour. Delta Ceramcoat All-Purpose Sealer: Worked decently, seems a bit more inclined to pool in the crevices with less colouring on the surfaces. Shiny finish. ADDEDUM (not pictured) Golden Acrylic Flow Release (undiluted): Applied well. Took a little while to dry. Shiny finish. Reaper Flow Improver: Applied well. Took a little while to dry. Finish is shiny in areas where wash pooled. Use a Medium as a Primer Because of how well acrylic based products adhere to the Bones material, it is also possible to use mediums as a primer alternative. Once dry, you can paint over them using thinned paint. These are applied by brush, or possibly with an airbrush. I tested a number of different brush-on products on some Bones Cave Trolls. These were straight out of the package and had not been cleaned. After the products dried, I applied a thin coat of paint to see how it behaved over each product. Reaper Master Series Brush-On Primer: Exhibited slight pulling away from some high or curved surfaces, though generally it just required running the brush over that section again to establish coverage. Dried quickly. Reaper Master Series Brush-On Sealer: No significant beading. Dried quickly. Paint was less durable than with the other products, see the durability testing section for more details and pictures. Golden Airbrush Medium: Bubbled a bit when applied, thin enough to pool a bit in depressions. Took more than 40 minutes to dry. This product works well if you use a drop or three to thin paint down for a base coat, although it does increase the drying time slightly. Due to it drying time, this is not the best choice as a primer alternative or for thinning washes that will be applied directly over Bones. Liquitex Matte Medium: Somewhat thick. Minor beading and pulling away. Significant beading when thinned with water. Dried quickly. When paint was applied, there were still some mild occurrences of paint pulling away from higher/curved areas. Liquitex Glazing Medium: Pretty thick consistency. Dried fairly quickly. The paint coat still beaded a little. Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium: Dried fairly quickly. Paint went on quite nicely. Also works on metal miniatures. Delta Ceramcoat All-Purpose Sealer: Dried quickly. The paint layer exhibited slightly pulling way. Folk Art Blending Gel: Extremely thick. Beaded up too much to use. Not pictured as it worked too poorly to continue to the testing stage. Speed Paint Drying with a Hairdryer Whether on a Bones or metal miniature, if you find that your paint is taking too long to dry, you can speed up the drying by using a hairdryer on the low setting on the paint. If the paint you’re drying is a wash, you should let it dry naturally for a little bit, or you risk blowing the paint out of the crevices and depressions you want to darken. Testing the First Coats for Durability Once you get your paint applied, you want to make sure that it stays there. In my experiments, the most durable Bones miniatures are those where the first coat applied to the miniature is undiluted Master Series paint. Several of the other substances I tested were pretty close in durability, but it should be noted that there were a few that performed poorly. I painted these ghosts in August 2012. They accompanied me to Gen Con and Pax Prime 2012, stored loose with some unpainted Bones in a plastic container I carried in my backpack. Their travels included a six hour car ride and return plane trip. At the conventions they were handled extensively by dozens upon dozens of people, including being tossed on tables. The paint jobs were stressed pretty much equally through the Gen Con trials. The ghost painted only with Reaper Master Series paint was handled a lot more than the others during the Pax Prime trials. The ghost sculpt has some thin and thus particularly bendy areas, most notably on the hood and where it meets the tombstone. I flexed these parts by hand repeatedly to additionally stress the paint. Unfortunately I chose poor colours to easily be able to see all the damage in the photos. After the first coat I used painting techniques of thinned layers and washes with no difficulty and with the same effect on each of the miniatures. From left to right the first coat on each miniature was as follows. Undiluted Reaper Master Series Paint: Displayed the least damage during the Gen Con trials. Following Pax, has some chips at the flex point on the hood and near the tombstone. Was handled a lot more than the other figures. Reaper Master Series Brush-On White Primer: A few very small chips at the flex points, and some paint has scraped off a few sharp protruding areas. (Edge of the hood, finger tips on one hand.) Dupli-Color Sandable White Primer Spray: The unpainted base stayed slightly tacky to the touch for weeks after priming. The figure has several small areas where paint was scraped off, but only one chip on a flex point. Testors Dullcote Spray: This product created a good surface for painting, but performed very poorly in the paint durability tests, and I would not recommend using it as a primer substitute if you plan to use your Bones for gaming. Chips formed on the major flex points early in the Gen Con testing, and the paint has flaked off extensively from there. The figure also has some small areas of scraping damage, but those are no more notable than on the Brush-On Primer or Dupli-Color figures. I wanted to perform a similar test with the other surface preparation products I tried. First I painted on an additional coat or two of paint. Then I placed the figures loose in a plastic box with some other Bones, a wooden, MDF and plastic base, and a metal figure. After wrapping the box in a towel secured with rubber bands, I put it in my dryer on the air setting for 10 minutes or so. The green painted areas on each figure are those that were painted over the primer alternatives. The brown painted areas are Master Series Paint directly on the Bones surface. (These were part of tests for methods to remove mould lines.) The brown areas on each exhibit very little damage. Some have none, some have a few small chips or scrapes. (However it should be noted the brown area of this sculpt has far fewer surface protrusions than where the green was painted.) From left to right: Reaper Master Series Brush-On Primer White; Reaper Master Series Brush-On Sealer; Golden Airbrush Medium; Liquitex Matte Medium. Three of the four show pretty similar levels of damage. The figure painted with Brush-On Sealer as a primer displays the most paint damage of all figures tested in this series. From left to right: Liquitex Glazing Medium; Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium; Delta Ceramcoat All-Purpose Sealer. Damage levels are pretty similar to the better performers above. The Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium and Liquitex Glazing Medium performed the best of the seven products tested. (The Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium performed better in terms of acting as a primer, and is inexpensive, so would be my recommendation between those two.)
  9. wickedshifty

    Stone Giant

    From the Facebook contest, although my frost giant queen was better I’d already shared her so I ended up using this guy. I was the only person who chose this model- I guess he is a bit understated. i was happy with how he came out. c&c always welcome!
  10. Metalchaos

    77636, Death Shroud

    Here's my 2018 Ghoulie Bag translucent smoky grey 77636, Death Shroud. I simply did a blueish highlight and painted the base on this Dark Heaven Bones model sculpted by Julie Guthrie.
  11. Adrift

    Nothic (Bones ghast conversion)

    Here is a conversion I did using a Bones Ghast. I like to use Nothics as spies, infiltrators and recurring villains in my DND game. I used copper wire as a starting point for spiky prominences on his back, added some spikes on his elbows and lastly, sculpted a central eye to cover the top of the ghast's face. I'm happy with the result, despite having to use painting skills to cover up the sub-par sculpting skills.
  12. Metalchaos

    77096, Labella DeMornay the Banshee

    Hi everyone, here's a simple paint job on a translucent version of 77096, Labella DeMornay. This model was sculpted by Julie Guthrie. I painted it with green ink and acrylics.
  13. The thread about the Drider and centaur I Frankensteined up from some Reaper and Citadel parts reminded me of this little gem I put together this summer as part of a coterie of Drow. I was originally inspired by the Reaper Bones Conversions thread Chaoswolf started, which had some cool examples of substituting Bones torsos on the Bones Dark Elf Arachnid Warriors. Since Bones are so easy to cut and carve up and glue together, I thought I'd give it a try. So this is the spider body from Reaper #77182, Arachnid Archer, and the upper half of #77057, Juliette, Female Sorceress. I carved her carefully to leave a peg for the spider body, and I've carved out little sockets on the spider body for the bags and flasks around her waist. This is a dry fitting, where you can see the way the two pieces more or less fit together under the waist: Here she is glued. I used epoxy (I know, I know, but I like its space-filling qualities). I left it thin on the back of her torso and added another layer once it had dried, let it get to the gloopy sticky phase, and carved some striations in it with a bamboo skewer to match the hairiness of the spider body. Here she is primed with Reaper Brown Liner, ready to paint:
  14. Howdy, Here she comes... Kev!
  15. Howdy, Come at me bro! Kev!
  16. I started a second first giant queen recently. I've done a fair amount of work on her so far but still have a long way to go.
  17. GodOfCheese

    Stormwing the Blue (pic-heavy)

    Learning from my previous forays into blending with wings, I decided to try for something more challenging. In doing this, I learned that sometimes the parts of bigger minis don't fit together as well as one hopes, which in this case resulted in some improvisation, especially around the foot/base socket and the wings. But I am enjoying how he came out. He was wondrously bumpy. :-)
  18. wickedshifty

    Margalauth

    He was a lot of work. like a lot. im glad he’s done.
  19. So while I've been painting some figures, my delightfully talented wife has been indulging her artistic streak. Basically she saw my feeble attempts, said "hold my tea!" and proceeded to give me a much needed humility lesson : ) While I've taught her everything I know, I in no way have taught her everything she knows... and it shows a bit, especially with her freehand : ) 77501: Minotaur He's big, he's blue, and he's coming to a labyrinth near you! 77022: Michelle, Female Human Ranger I just adore the shading & freehand on her cloak. 77441: Ostarzha, Elf Cleric The freehand on this is very subtle and hard to see, but utterly gorgeous. Translucent Green Weapon Sprue And while it doesn't really fit here, I can't see myself making a separate topic for it. Here's one of the green weapon sprue weapons I painted up with Tamiya Clear Green on the blade & pommel. Whosoever pulls this sword from this lump of blue "granite" will be the Queen of the Kingdom!
  20. brehaut

    77176: Familiars (Cat, Wolf, Bat)

    This weekend I painted up half the bones Familiars 1 set—the wolf, bat, and cat—as part of my plan to make it through some of my backlog. It’s been a really rewarding and fun set to paint, none of the minis take long, and despite the most of the figures being tiny the easy access to reference material made them pretty straight forward.
  21. Laoke

    Bones Blackstar Corsairs

    Hi there! You might remember me from such threads as "Bones! Do they blend?" and "How to use Tamiya Clear Paints to varnish your translucent patio furniture!". I don't paint much over the Southern Hemisphere Winter, as I'm too busy snowboarding, but now that the sun is out again it's time to start working through my Immortality Shelf and get some paint on some figures. Today we're looking at the Blackstar Corsairs: 80080: Blackstar Corsair Echo, 80079: Blackstar Corsair Delta, 80078: Blackstar Corsair Charlie, 80077: Blackstar Corsair Bravo, and 80076: Blackstar Corsair Alpha. In general these have all been painted up as a unit, using a speed paint method. The undercoat is MSP 09066 Blue Liner. The main base color is MSP 09288 LED Blue, shaded down with a succession of glazes of MSP 09280 Nightmare Blue. I love the shading this gives, it's a very striking effect. The visors I've done using a base coat of MSP HD 29806 Fireball Orage, working up to MSP 09051 New Gold, and then layering over Tamiya X-24 Clear Yellow. This gives a great depth of color to the visor, and is supposed to look like the gold leaf covering a traditional spacesuit visor. The back power packs are basically a MSP 0939 Pure White base, worked up to Fireball Orange on the central core & MSP 09094 Clear Red on the retaining arms. Details have been picked out with Vallejo Model Air 71.064 Chrome. The weapons are Blue Liner, dry brushed with VMA 71.073 Black Metal then knocked back with a wash of Nightmare Blue to tie them back to the rest of the figure even if only slightly. 80079: Blackstar Corsair Delta 80080: Blackstar Corsair Echo 80078: Blackstar Corsair Charlie 80076: Blackstar Corsair Alpha 80077: Blackstar Corsair Bravo
  22. Zink

    77440: Masumi, Demon Hunter

    Grabbed this mini because I wanted to try out the Golden skin triad. I've also been reading and watching a bunch of painting tutorials and wanted to do a better job than my usual slop and smear. Pretty happy with how she turned out but disappointed somewhat with the metal on the weapons and her hair. Didn't realise you can't see her eyes very good in the photo until now but I even did a decent job on them. Would be happy to get any feedback on how to improve her hair and weapons. Someday I need to get some makeup tips too because whenever I try to do it on my lady's they look like a drunken nightmare.
  23. BellTower

    89005: Amiri, Iconic Barbarian

    Painted Amiri up as a Goliath barbarian.
  24. Geoff Davis

    89012: Lem, Iconic Bard

    89012: Lem, Iconic Bard sculpted by Derek Schubert. This guy was supposed to be a speed paint, but I got too interested in putting diamond patterns on his clothes.
  25. Adrift

    23 additional September figures

    Friends! Here are 23 additional figures I painted in September. The results are largely for tabletop, or slightly better than tabletop quality. The Dreadmere Hunter was a free miniature at ReaperCon...I hated it but got it for my son, he loved it and his little 8-year-old heart decided that it was to be his DND ranger I also painted the Barrel Mimic which Galladoria Games gave away as a new attendee this year. I painted a DGS miniature named Jhenkar (a small version of the Neverending Story dragon). I also painted two Red Box Games miniatures, Derek the Dim and Hvitarnor (first time doing a 5-o'clock shadow). Lots of experimenting with TMM and NMM. Just having fun, trying things and enjoying making progress...
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