Jump to content


Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'deepwars'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Reaper Discussion
    • FAQs 'n Stuff
    • News
    • Reaper General
    • Chronoscope
    • Bones Miniatures & Legendary Encounters
    • ReaperCon
  • Craft Corner
    • Show Off
    • Painting Tips & Advice
    • RBC: Reaper Broadcast Channel
    • Works In Progress
    • Shutterbug
    • Sculpting
    • Speed / Army / Tabletop Techniques
    • Conversions, Presentation, and Terrain
    • Mini Exchanges and Paint Contests
  • Reaper Games
    • CAV
    • Warlord
  • General Discussion
    • General Fantasy
    • General Sci-Fi
    • General Modern / Historical
    • Kickstarter
    • Off-Topic Rampancy
  • The Sandbox
    • The Gathering
    • The Playing
    • Fiction, Poetry, and Other Abuses

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 22 results

  1. So these are a couple of "mantis warriors" which I'm painting up as thri-kreen, the insectoid race from the Dark Sun and Spelljammer D&D settings. They are Reaper's 03552: Klichik, Mantis Warrior (the taller one), sculpted by John Winter, and 03142: Zizzix, Mantis Warrior (the squatter one), sculpted by Michael Brower. Here they are for scale (and unassembled) with Reaper's 03155: Vandora Waverunner, Pirate, sculpted by Bob Ridolfi. Straight out of the package they have a very flat silhouette. Here they are assembled, primed, and washed with thinned-down Burnt Umber. I gently bent some of their limbs forward to ease the flatness a tad. One source said all thri-kreen were golden brown; another said they were earthy shades of red, yellow, and sometimes green. I decided to paint the taller one red and the shorter one yellow. I mixed some dull, opaque colors using Iron Oxide Red and Yellow, each mixed with a greying-down blend of browns and white, and brushed them on thinly. As god is my witness, this thing is not so pink in real life. I painted this same yellow on both of the creatures' bases. Then I washed over them with some thinned-down Burnt Umber. To be continued!
  2. AntiMatter

    Painting a Kraken - Step By Step

    Hi folks, The new Deepstar Kraken model is coming out soon for DeepWars and I painted up this one for display using a lot of inks and liquid acrylics. This model (not really a miniature when this big) was done in different stages. The base painting was done with blue skin and light tentacles. The mantle and top of the tentacles were given two washes of Marine Blue (Ultramarine) liquid acrylics (Dr. Phil Martins brand) mixed with matte medium and water. When the first was dry, the second was applied. The underside of the tentacles was done with a mix of Cerulean Blue ink (Liquitex) + white paint + Matte medium and water. After removing from the base, as it was making it difficult to reach the bottom of the tentacles, I applied many light blue glazes (Cerulean Blue + Ultramarine Blue + White) for highlights and some dark (Ultramarine Blue) glazes for shadows. The goal was to make the blending mostly smooth but not to go overboard and spend too long on it. The reason will become clear soon. The next stage was the big one. Dots of blue-green, green, yellow-green, white and various shades of orange and Burnt Umber were applied to the mantle and tentacles. This was done using Liquitex inks and Phil Martin liquid acrylics to make sure the dots were very pure in color and, more importantly, flowed evenly off the end of the brush, which was held and used like a pen. After the dots had dried, glazes of inks colors were applied, yellow-green to the mantle and tips of tentacles and bright orange to the “face”. When this dried, more dots were applied over them and highlights were applied to some of the dots using a bit of white or yellow mixed into the ink. The eyes were done with yellow liquid acrylic mixed with white, black, and a bit of blue as the base. It was highlighted with more white and a touch of yellow. The black iris was painted, then more white highlights were applied around it to clean it up. Finally, the big highlight was added at the top with thinned white. The eyes were not painted as gems (bright bottom, dark top with hot-spot secular reflection) here as the light was meant to be diffused by the water. Maybe next time. The base was done with washes of Burnt Sienna ink first, then washes of Pthalho blue and Marine Blue ink to darken the rocks. it was all drybrushed with Americana brand Buttermilk, then some glazes of greens, magentas and purples were added to the sponges and corals. The barnacles were drybrushed with some white to make them stand out.
  3. Hello! I've recently started working on a diorama, and a friend of mine urged me to post here. The only thing that is missing from the pictures below is the kelp that will be behind the kraken (on the little pads on the back side of the base). It is some floppy aquarium kelp that I"m currently trying to figure out how to get it to stand up straight. Tips, tricks, C&C are all welcomed. Here is the pre-primed coral wall in varying states of sand coverage. The coral is planned to be very brightly colored. Primed base: You can see the kelp pads in the pic above. Base with Kraken for staging verification: Here is the almost finished diver, who goes in the slot in front of the Kraken. This drab, dirty human looking down at his feet while the kraken looms above is one of my favorite parts, tbh. Cheers! Valk
  4. AntiMatter

    Ol' Ginny Greenteeth - the Sea Hag

    Hi folks, Here is my painted version of the Sea Hag, Ol’ Ginny Greenteeth for the Nereids of Blood Reef, for DeepWars. It's a pre-production model as the final one is coming out later. She was done with a lot of washes and glazes over a “zenith-primed” base. Most of you already know how this is done, with a base coat of black primer all over, then white primer sprayed from above to simulate how light falls on the model. The skin was started with Phthalo Green ink + black paint + Matte medium. The clothing was started first with an olive hue, made with an Ivy green paint mixed with Burnt Umber and Burnt Sienna ink. The skin was highlighted with the green ink + a light golden white (Buttermilk color – Americana brand) and white. This clothing was highlighted with addition of the golden white paint. Kelp was painted with additional Ivy green and highlighted with a touch of yellow and buttermilk. Shells were glazed with golden white and then glazed with Burnt Sienna ink before getting edge highlights with pure white. Her hair was done with a “Sea Foam” color, which was Phthalo green and a touch of Phthalo blue ink and white paint for the base, then highlighted with white. The base was done with a light glaze of Burnt Sienna ink over the rocks, then let dry, while the spiky coral was painted with Deep Violet ink. When all dry, the rock was washed with Phthalo blue ink. The crab was painted with a light glaze of Burnt Sienna ink, then Pthahlo blue on the back shell and highlighted with thinned white. The worms were painted with a blue-purple gray, highlighted with white.
  5. AntiMatter

    Sea Serpent Step-by-Step painting

    Hi all, Here is one more step by step painting tutorial for the Sea Serpent for DeepWars, Blood Reef. This scaly creature is related to dragons so it has very heavy scales that work well with washes and glazes. Inks are Liquitex Pro inks and the Matte Medium is by Liquitex. Paints are Golden Fluid Acrylics. White and black are standard Americana brand craft paint. The first step was to paint the whole body in a light yellow shade over white primer, leaving only the mouth white. This was left to dry. Next, the body was given a wash of Pthalho Green ink, mixed with a touch of Sap Green ink, mixed with Matte Medium and water. The fins and mouth were washed with a Magenta ink, medium and water mix. The ratio of ink/medium/water was around 40/40/20. This was allowed to dry fully before the next step. Now comes the ugly step of shading down everything. The body, fins and mouth was washed with a mixture of Violet ink and a bit of black paint to darken it, and mixed with medium and water. The ratio was 20/30/50, so thin enough to go into all of the cracks but not so dark that it stained all of the green into oblivion. This was allowed to dry fully before moving onto highlighting. Finally, the step that makes everything pop out of the shadows again. The scales wee lightly drybrushed with wet layers of a mixture of Cerulean Blue ink, Sap Green ink and white paint. This was like a drybrush with a glaze, with the mixture at around 20/80, paint+ink to water. The key was to try to be subtle and give a bit more softness to the shading on the scales. The idea is not to paint completely over the green scales though or even to add a bright blueish highlight. After the glaze-drybrush, edges were painted in thinned white paint using the tip of a brush. This seems a bit tedious but is quicker than you may think since only the portion of the scale facing the light needs to be highlighted. Some scales on the neck behind the head needed a bit more highlight in the center, so a very thin glaze of thinned white was applied with the tip of the brush. The mouth was given washes of black to shade it more, then highlighted with thinned white, then glazed with Magenta ink. The tongue was shaded with Dioxazene purple ink, then highlighted with Magenta ink + white. fins were highlighted on the edges with white, then had some tiny white dots added for additional texture. The eyes were done with yellow over white, shaded with Burnt Sienna ink, then given a black slit pupil and hotspot reflection of pure white. To finish things off, the body was shaded with glazed of Deep Violet ink + black paint + medium and water (20/40/40) ratio of color, medium and water. adding the color more to the bottom of the body. An additional glaze of Pthalho Blue ink was applied to deepen the shadows. When these glazes dried, some scale edge highlights needed to be re-applied. The base was done with Raw Sienna ink first, then when dry, given a wash of Pthalho Blue ink + medium and water. Corals were glazed in Burnt Sienna ink and Violet ink. When all dry, it was drybrushed with a light golden sand paint.
  6. Hi all, It has been a while since the last post, but here is a quick, step-by-step painting guide to the Silver Death Fish for DeepWars. This model is suspiciously similar to an ancient Xiphactinus fish, but has slightly different fins, with a few finlets near the tail like a tuna. This model was primed in white and painted using the techniques very similar to the Dire Fish-Lizard from the AMG painting guide, Painting Scaly Beasts. The key was to use washes and glazes to give it the basic colors, then lighten sections with thinned white paint and make edges pop with pure white. The majority of the colors were Liquitex Professional Acrylic Ink, while paint was Golden Fluid Acrylics and Americana white and black. All ink was mixed with Liquitex Matte Medium and water to give it more body to flow into the cracks. Otherwise it tended to stain the scales instead of flow into them. So the first step was to paint the upper sides, back with very thin washes, almost glazes, of Deep Turquoise ink and medium. The mixture was around 20% ink, 40% medium and 40% water. These are not exact numbers, but the mixture was light enough to apply color and flow into scales but left a lot of lightness. A key here was to set the model upside down while it dried so the color did not flow down the entire body. When it was dry, the next color applied was Quinacriadone Magenta ink, painted in a very light glaze around the middle of the body and onto parts of the head and the fins. The mixture was more about the same density as before but less was held on the brush so it did not run everywhere. The model was held upside normally while applying this glaze also. Next, The head, belly and lower body was painted with a glaze of the original turquoise mixture. Finally, a wash of Pthalho Blue ink (same medium and water percentage as before) was applied on the top of the back. The model was inverted and light brush strokes were used to push the glaze further down the back and blend it with the Turquoise scales. The next step was basic shading, done with more glazes or Pthalho Blue ink on the back and Turquoise ink on the sides, going over the Magenta scales. This glaze was very thin, closer to 10% ink, 40% medium and 50% water, with the here to tie all of the colors together with blue. Also applied were glazes of black paint mixed with Pthalho blue ink onto the top of the back and in the mouth. It looks pretty messy now, but you can make out the basic idea of the light and shadow. When all of the color had dried, the next stage was adding basic highlights. This was done with slightly thinned white paint, maybe 60/40 paint and water, applied lightly onto areas that would reflect light. This mixture was used with very careful drybrushing in multiple layers on the scales to build up edge highlights. It is important to brush perpendicular to the scales and not scrub in all directions here as otherwise the scales just get a coating of white. The goal is to just do the edges of the scales lightly and build up layers. Also, a glaze of white was applied along the upper third of the body to increase lightness there, allowing it to flow into the cracks and all. This glaze is just paint and water and was "scrubbed" around a bit with the brush to blend it. This technique is also called "feathering" but is basically just quick brush strokes to reduce the sharp edge of the glaze. The final stage was done with edge highlights of more white paint, mixed with less water, around 80% paint, 20% water. This mixture was used for some edge drybrushing on the scales, and on the fins and teeth, with some additional black paint glazed in the mouth and around the base of the teeth. This mixture was uses with a fine brush to pick out scales using the tip of the brush to add highlights where the drybrush missed. Some pure white paint was used on scales that were lightened in the previous step. On the fins, the edges were highlighted with 80/20 white, but some fine line details were added with 50/50 white using a fine-tipped brush. To finish off the glazes, a light mixture of Raw Sienna ink and Primary Yellow paint (10% color, 40% medium, 50% water) was applied along the middle of the body, above the magenta section, and on the head and around the eye. The eye was painted with a mixture of yellow and white paint, with a black pupil and a tiny dot of pure white for a hotspot reflection. The base was done in steps similar to the body, with a wash of Burnt Sienna paint, medium and water (20/40/40), then when dry, two washes of Pthalho Blue ink (20/40/40) to build up color. The base had some small cracks in it that were filled with extra Matte Medium and allowed to dry, then painting over them. Sections of sponges were painted with Pure Burnt Sienna ink and the starfish was done with Dioxazene Purple ink + white paint. Some Sap Green ink was applied as a glaze to add more color to the rock.
  7. I'm getting excited for some new Deepwars models and I've been rushing to finish as much of my backlog as I can. these Garks (an Abyssal Gark and an Abyssal Gark Mangler) needed a few finishing touches to get them off of the shelf of shame, and once I got back into it they were actually really fun to paint - greens and purples always look nice together. They will be some much needed troop muscle for the small Scaly Horde warband I have. These guys are pretty formidable size-wise, so I rebased them on some larger 40mm bases rather than use the base inserts they came with. I included a load of pictures, for your viewing enjoyment. These guys make a pretty great pair, I think. I was pleasantly surprised with the effect on the back of the crystal trident, but I was a little disappointed with the way the greens photographed.The sandy bases were a bit of an experiment and I really liked how striking the ripples in the sand turned out. I'll definitely be trying this effect again in the future. As always, I'd love some comments and constructive criticism.
  8. Citrine

    The Evil Little Mermaid

    This is the Siren Maneater from Antimatter Games (DW2022) in resin. I see her as Ursula from the Little Mermaid after she has stolen Ariel's voice. I just love her pose!
  9. vulture

    Dagathonan salvager (AMG)

    I haven't been posting may of my recently completed projects, a trend I've been meaning to correct. Since my mind is "under the sea" right now, I figured I'd start with this colorful fellow. It is a pretty straightforward paintjob. The very large eyes were fun to paint, and I found that I actually like to paint in yellows.
  10. AntiMatter

    Jade Salamander sculpt and paint

    Hi all, Here is the painted version of the sculpt I did for the Jade Salamander, a 60mm tall brute of the lizardman made in FIMO classic. It is all cast up in resin now for the ShadowSea game and is currently going out to backers of the Rise of the Draconids kickstarter. The painted version was done with many washes and glazes of inks and transparent paints, followed by opaque paints for highlights. The sword was metallics and inks.
  11. Hi all, The next miniatures getting the step-by-step painting guide is Tecchuili, Captain of Atalán. This figure is encased in golden-orange armor, so the initial basecoats were done with Primary Yellow paint (Golden Fluid acrylics) It was kept thin enough to allow the white primer to show through on highlights. The fins, spear blade and crystals on the gun were painted with thin Cerulean Blue ink. The spear shaft and gun were painted with thinned gold paint. One the base coats were dry, the initial midtone step was started. The armor was given a wash of a thick mix of Burnt Sienna Ink and Matte Medium, glopping it on so it filled all cracks and crevices. The gun was painted with Deep Turquoise ink and Matte Medium while the spear haft was painted with a mix of Burnt Umber and a bit of Turquoise inks and Matte Medium. The hands and fingers were washed with Burnt Umber ink. The shading step was done with additional glazes of Burnt Sienna ink + a touch of black, painted on the arms, shoulders and knee armor. The upper legs and lower legs were glazed with Burnt Umber ink mixed with a bit of black paint. This color was applied to the upper chest plate between the filigree also. The fins were washed with Pthalo Blue ink mixed with 50% Matte Medium while the blade and crystal were given an additional layer of Cerulean blue ink. The next stage was the highlighting and finish stage, one that took the longest. The key to all figures with armor is to get sharp edge highlights and this one was no different. Edge highlights were applied using a mix of white and Primary Yellow paint, with pure white used for certain hotspots. The paint was kept thin (50% water) for most details. For the upper and lower legs, a thin glaze of yellow+white highlight was painted on the front and back in a swath, with more applied as a line reflection in the middle of the swath. After that, the edges of the plates were highlighted using the tip of the brush, making lines that went around the legs completely. The forearms were given light glazes of yellow+white in the middle, then fine lines of brighter yellow-white were painted along the ridges of the of the armor there. The main armor plates were highlighted on the edge with yellow-white paint, building up multiple layers on the upper sections of the armor. The tip of the brush was used for most small details, but the side of the brush was used for larger armor plate edges. In the upper chest plate, pure yellow was used for the filigree, with pure white hotspots. Next, the gun and spear haft was highlighted on the edges with gold + silver paint. The crystals were highlighted with pure white paint. Some additional blending was done on the fins, head fins and face plate with multiple layers of Cerulean Blue ink + white paint. The faceplate was painted with a main highlight on the top and a fine line of white on the bottom. A bit of blue glow was applied to the top of the spear haft and around the gun gems using thinned light blue. The glow was also added inside the gun, with light blue applied inside the holes, slats and the barrel end. Some small details were added to the knees, with Navy Blue painted first in the circles, then very light blue-white painted in a swirl inside the dark blue circle. Similar patterns were done on the chest diamonds and on the circles on the plate around the elbows. These were highlighted with small white dots. The last step was to paint the base with bright magenta ink on the coral, mixing the magenta with Pthalo Blue ink for the rest of the base. The coral was glazed with layers of blue+magenta close to the seafloor. Highlights were done with thin layers of white paint, adding lines on the bottom edge of the holes in the coral. Many small dots of pure white were painted on the coral and the seafloor to make shells and bleached coral sections.
  12. fanguad

    DeepWars Salvage Mech Construct

    I started by giving him a base coat of MSP Clockwork Brass, then used various washes and inks I had to give him different colors in random patterns. I had to go back with a light coat of brass to get some of the shine back. I used Tamiya Clears to make the "eyes" really pop out. I also added Metallic Medium (metallic white, basically) to the brass as highlights on some of the edges of the metal. The base is mostly pumice paste, with some Army Painter grass clumps, flock and cork "rocks" to give it some texture. I used more inks and washes to color the pumice, then lightly drybrushed brighter colors over them to give it a little bit more texture. I did the same with the grass clumps - the matte medium from the inks & washes stage gave it some extra strength so that the drybrush stage worked even better. Then I put a heavy coat of gloss sealer over the whole thing (including the base) to help give the impression that it's underwater. I went fast on this guy because I was just having fun (as opposed to trying to make him look really nice), but even so he probably clocked in at 6-8 hours. I should really start timing myself so I know how long these things take.
  13. Continuing my weekend of “paint multi-legged mechs,†I started on the Salvage Mech Construct from DeepWars. I decided I would try to emulate Antimatter’s painting style (without spending too much time on it). I airbrushed him with brass, then started playing with inks and washes. I only have a couple of inks, and they did seem to work better for this purpose. I had to go back over the washes with thinned brass to keep things shiny. He’s pretty close to finished actually. I need to touch up a few spots, maybe incorporate some feedback if I get any (especially appreciated if AntiMatter sees this), then work on his base. Paints used. You can also see the start of his base.
  14. Citrine

    Antimatter Games Cephalid Siren

    The Deepwars Cephalid Siren from Antimatter Games is exactly how I imagine the 50 Fathoms witches look. A great sculpt and very fun to paint.
  15. AntiMatter

    Nautiloid speed paint

    Here is a Nautiloid Chrysalid for DeepWars done in some fast washes, a bit of blending and edge highlights to finish quickly. The shell was two two main colors over a white primer, Burnt Sienna ink (Liquitex) and then when dry, Pthalo Blue ink. The inks on the shell were applied in washes, so covering everything and moderately thick, mixed with Liquitex matter medium and a bit of water to give better flow. The tentacles were Pthalo Blue ink wash, with A Dioxazene Purple wash near the "face". Then the face and thin tentacles got a wash of Magenta ink. Highlights were added with a bit of white mixed with the ink, and some Cerulean Blue ink for the blue, and magenta for the purple areas. After highlights, a glaze of blue ink was added to the big tentacles to help enhance the shadows near the face. The eyes were Indian Yellow (Golden Fluid Acrylics), highlighted with white mixed in. The base had washes of blue, green, sienna and umber ink with a bit of drybrushing with Reaper MSP Golden Highlight. The shell got Golden Highlight on the edges also, and on barnacles. The Weapon was gold with a wash of Pthalo Blue ink, then a glaze of Burn Sienna (just a bit), then highlighted with Reaper shining gold and silver. Some Sap Green ink was added around barnacles and encrusting growth. For gaming figures like this with a lot of texture, using washes and then doing edge highlights is very effective as much of the blending occurs from the washes. The basic highlights on the tentacles were done quickly almost like drybrushing, especially on the suckers. It is still important to do some edge highlights though, using almost pure white, to add contrast and define the parts. The crystal on the weapon, for example, was just a wash of blue ink and white lines on the facet edges. Simple and quick.
  16. Here are some painted Dark Mariners done using the basic glaze style of painting using inks and translucent paint, followed by highlights using opaque paint. This style is very effective for anything with scales and surface texture. This was a set of gaming-level figures, so painting them in an efficient way was critical, something that the glaze style really helps with. A couple were already started, but overall, this was a weekend's work, so not too long. They key, as always with the glaze style, is to shadow with contrasting colored inks. In this case, the shell is a burnt Sienna over white primer, making a nice orange color, then it was shaded with dark blue ink and some black paint. Then finally, a bit more burnt sienna ink to bring the orange back out on the highlights. The encrusting sea growth was given a glaze of Sap Green ink, a very nice forest green color. Then everything was touched up with bone and white on the edges and barnacles.
  17. AntiMatter

    The Smattering

    Here is a smattering of gaming minis painted with washes and glazes for DeepWars and ShadowSea. The metallics in the first photo are started in either gold or bronze with a light coating so the white primer shows through in highlight areas. The metals were then washed with blur/green ink to make shadows, and in some, given a glaze of burnt sienna to bring back some bright color. Then they were highlighted with gold+silver, with more highlight used for "cleaner" metal while the more dingy metal had in mainly on the edges. Finally, extra biofouling color was added with Sap green ink. The jellyfish mech was a little different in that more green ink was used on the armor, and the white area was glazed with turquoise ink + matte medium only. Some very fine amounts of black paint were added to some cracks, but the goal was to make that section as bright as possible. When dry, the white plates were highlighted with thinned white paint, with edges in pure white. Eric www.antimatter-games.com
  18. AntiMatter

    Dire Fish-Lizard

    Hi all, Up from the depths comes the Dire Fish-Lizard. I sculpted this a while back and it was good to finally be able to paint it properly. This one was almost entirely done with ink washes and glazes, with edge highlights using opaque paint to finish it up. This one will be going into a painting guide that was part of the latest Kickstarter for ShadowSea/DeepWars (Rise of the Draconids) to show the glaze technique for painting scaly beasts. http://antimatter-games.com/games/draconids-pledge
  19. AntiMatter

    Giant Anglerfish

    Hi all, Here is another one I just finished, the Giant Anglerfish. I also sculpted it, but I'm just going to show the painting steps. To simplify things, any inks referred to in the text are Liquitex Professional Acrylic Inks, and the matte medium is by Liquitex also. White and Black paint is Americana Brand. So, step one is the ubiquitous zenith priming, with black first, then white at an off angle from above, maybe about 60 degrees up (30 deg from nadir). It takes some practice to get the right amount of coverage and the highlights doing this, but it makes washes and glazes easier to apply and get a good result quickly. The next step is to apply base coats with thinned opaque paint, and by that I mean things like most hobby paints created for coverage. They should be thinned to a light cream consistency. For the body, Vallejo Game Color "Hot Orange" was used. The teeth were given a coat of Americana Desert Sand (cheap but effective paint). Th mouth was given a light coat of purple ink mixed with Desert Sand. The fins, eye and lure were given a light coat of Cerulean Blue ink, which is more like a thin opaque paint than a transparent ink. Everything was left to dry fully before the next step. The next step was to make the bold red base color. This was done with Napthol Crimson ink, after which it was left to dry fully. Next, the rad was darkened with Golden Fluid Acrylics Quinacridone Red, a very transparent red with very dark and bold color, mixed with various amounts of black, matte medium and water. This step involved some wet blending to give a bit of transition. It took a few applications of the paint, letting it dry in between, to get the dark shadow area on the cheek. The teeth were given a wash of black + purple ink + Desert Sand. Again, everything was allowed to dry fully. It may help to have a fan nearby. The next step is something that may be called "ugly" as it is a rough drybrush of VGC Hot Orange all over the body, with some stippling to make an irregular skin pattern. Now back to "pretty" again, with a glaze of Quinacridone Red to even out the drybrushing, and then highlights added all over the body with Hot Orange, mixed in some places with a bit of Reaper Golden Highlight. Here, some of the creases and cracks are highlighted on the bottom edge to make them look like they are illuminated from above. The lights were the focus of this step. They were fist given a light coat of Cerulean Blue ink, then highlighted with a mix of white and blue ink. More highlights were added to the body here also. Glow from the lure was added to the head with a glaze of Cerulean Blue ink, "scrubbed" around with the brush to make it a bit irregular. The fins were glazed with Dioxazine Purple ink. Now, to finish things off, the lights were highlighted some more with pure white, thinned so it went on smoothly and could be applied in layers. The fins were given a wash of thin Hot Orange near where they join the body. Then the whole fins were brushed with purple ink mixed with white paint. The teeth were given multiple layers if white, mixed with a touch of Cerulean Blue ink, while the inside of the mouth was given light glazes of pink, shadows with washes of black paint, then some more highlights with pink. The eye was done by painting a light gray iris, then applyign multiple layers of thinned white to make it look hazy, then adding the reflections with pure white paint. When dry, more glazes of white were added over to smooth it out. Some edge highlights were applied to the body with Cerulean Blue + white to make the source lighting effect. The base was painted with a drybrush of Desert Sand. When dry, it was given a wash of Turquoise Ink then let to dry. Then it was washed with Burnt Sienna ink, with some Magenta ink here and there, and then given a glaze of Burnt Sienna and Turquoise ink mixed together (a greenish hue). This was allowed to dry fully, then white highlights were added. Now, here is a size comparison of the anglerfish with the nautiloid and a little Clal-Chk bug man (still close to 35mm tall). The other figures would make a nice snack for the anglerfish.
  20. vulture

    calamari and frankenfish

    a Cephalid Biomancer and Deepspawn Reaver for your viewing enjoyment. These are a great couple of Halloween minis: a frankenstein style human-robot-fish monster and its demented creator, a horrific mutated being that is more tentacle than humanoid. One of the nice things about undersea freaks is free license to go hog wild with colors that would seem bizarre on land but are perfectly natural beneath the waves. i definitely did that here; lots of experimentation with blues pinks and purples. even the bright oranges on the base seem right at home on these minis. between that and the wonderful textures Bob Olley creates the dark mariners are a painters playground. I have been diving head long in to my Deepwars and Shadowsea collection and most everything is prepped and ready to paint so expect to sea a lot more of these from me (2x the pun!). so, what do you think?
  21. Gabbi

    Abyssal Gark w.i.p.

    I've started working on Abyssal Gark, from DeepWars game. I'm trying to replicate the color effect of the drawing in the book, and wanted to share some early pics to get some impressions. I'm not the kind of painter that keeps other areas clean, so I ususally don't share wips, but for this one I would like to get some comments. Does the 'randomly' shaded skin looks silly?
  22. MonkeySloth

    DeepWars Mini-Kicker

    The 2 week long deepwars KS has started. http://www.kickstart...yss-mini-kicker Wonder if the OP can retitle this thread to be Shadowseas\deepwars as there's no real reason to start a new thread.
×