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Found 8 results

  1. I'm getting ready to paint my Kyphryxis Dragon in the Translucent Bones, and wanted to test how the different colors of the Tamiya Clears looked on the Bones translucent material. So I picked up some of the 77306 Translucent Slimes. These are literally quick paints - I just slopped on the Tamiya Clear on each one. I'm posting them here not to show off, but for your convenience and reference. Warning - Pic heavy First off, a plain, untouched translucent Bones slime: Next, painted in Tamiya Clear Yellow: Next in Tamiya Clear Blue: Tamiya Clear Green: Tamiya Clear Smoke: Tamiya Clear Red: Tamiya Clear Orange: And finally, my actual test piece, which I'm calling a "Fire Slime". I will probably be using a similar scheme for my Kyphrixis: As you can see, the Tamiya Clears are really good at literally changing the color of the translucent Bones material, while maintaining the translucency. At some point, i think I'm going to try and pick up multiples of some of the other translucent colors, and do similar test pieces. I already know from the fire elementals that it will change the tones of the red/orange Bones.
  2. These are my first two painted minis in I think several decades, with probably fewer than 10 total even including my old figures. Being me, I decided to start with easy figures but non-standard paints. These were scrubbed, then primed with Army Painter Anti-Gloss Varnish to get as strong a grip as possible on a translucent figure. I decided to do the flat slime as a Crystal Ooze. For this I mixed Gallery Glass Charcoal Black, White Pearl, and Pledge Floor Polish in about equal parts. (It's hard to really dole out equal portions with the Gallery Glass sampler pots...) I gave the top a couple of layers - about 15 minutes between coats, since it takes a while for the Gallery Glass to firm up though it's a bit faster with thin layers and the floor polish added in. I decided it was a bit too pearly and not quite dark enough, so added some more Charcoal Black and a bit of water after that for the last three layers. With the top done to my liking, I added a few drops of MSP Black Ink to the remainder and gave the bottom a couple of coats. The result was a bit too shiny, so I gave it a final quick finish of the Anti-Gloss Varnish to dull it just a bit. The rearing slime is an attempt at an Ochre Jelly. I used the same basic 2:1 Gallery Glass to Floor Polish formula, this time with Harvest Yellow and Cocoa Brown. Again after two layers I felt the color was a bit too "happy" and added some more Cocoa Brown. I did two more layers and then added a few drops of MSP Brown Ink to the mix (not well blended, so I could make adjustments) and did a thin glaze with that. I didn't bother with the final Varnish coat on this one - the Ink glaze provided enough of a dulling effect on its own IMHO. The pictures don't really do justice to the transparency of the Gallery Glass paint; phone flash really killed the ambient lighting through the figures.
  3. Today, I unveil my first successful sculpt. That I am somewhat PROUD of, that is. I once sculpted a very passable goblin head. In 62mm. Trouble is, it had started out as 25mm. But today, I break the streak of failure; the BLACK GLOBULOID is complete and ready to face off against adventurers! Now, the Monster Manual calls 'em Black Puddings, and I suppose that's what this is, but I find the name indistinct; google "black pudding," and the first thing you get is a bunch of recipe and cooking sites from Yorkshire and suchlike. That's not what I wanted. In Soviet D&D, pudding eats YOU! So this is a Black Globuloid, and you can jolly well use the BP stat block if it suits you, or not. Awhile back at a FLGS, I noted in the glass case full of singles that WotC had released a Black Pudding miniature. It was on a largish base, and was designed like an enveloping wave, big enough that you could put a medium mini INSIDE it, on the same base. I LIKED that idea. And then I priced the single. They wanted fifteen bucks for it. "$15? For something that looks like I could do it in fifteen minutes with... a hot... glue... gun....?" I thought, as the wheels began to spin... And so I began. It started with one of the big Reaper bases left over from a previous Kickstarter; I figured if it didn't work, I could just peel off the hot glue and reuse the base for a more successful project. I then centered a little glass bell jar on the base, and ran a bead of hot glue along the bottom, sorta fastening it to the base... and then building upwards a little... messily and gloppily. From there, I basically built half a birdcage out of hot glue, let it cool, and then carefully pried the bell jar away from the glue. The bottom of the cage came loose from the base in a couple of places, but a dab more hot glue fixed that. And from there, I just glopped hot glue into the gaps in the bird cage... until I had a solid, semicircular wall. Then I stuck the bell jar back in there, and glopped more hot glue over it until it was a sort of breaking wave, then let it cool, popped the bell jar out, and laid a coat of black paint on it, inside and out. It was mostly dry when these pictures were taken, but you can still see a few damp spots. The Dwarf Butcher is included for scale. Altogether, I find it a perfectly acceptable ooze, at the cost of a base, about three mini hot glue sticks and some paint. I do think it'll look even better after a coat of gloss varnish, though. In the course of this post, though, it was mentioned to me that when you beat up on a Black Pudding, it splits into smaller puddings. I guess I'll need to make some more.
  4. 03483, Slime sculpted by Kevin Williams. Also available in in 10031, Dungeon Horror Boxed Set.
  5. No dungeon is complete without some oozey goodness! These two were done using paint thinned into a wash. I just applied several coats, and a layer or two of brush varnish in between. I love the way they came out. My wife said they look like candy. I give you, my purple and grey oozes! CAH
  6. Some tabletop Lemures from Reaper Bones II and Center Stage miniatures. In D&D 5th Edition, the lemure is probably the wimpiest monster in the whole book, I think a standard goblin can kill at least 20 of them. Reaper Bones 77326: Center Stage Miniatures 003:
  7. After seeing Laoke's slimes, I wanted an ochre jelly with translucency. Hotglue shaped by dunking a mass of it into icewater (great tip I saw on the DM's Craft FB page), building up a wave. Used a lighter to melt down any wispy hotglue threads (one snuck by), then hotglued to a 1.5" base already prepped as cave floor. Slathered on a mix of yellow-orange food colouring and slow curing Delta Creative PermEnamel gloss. TBH it's more yellow in person, being very close to Laoke's G-cube's colour. but my camera refuses to capture that.
  8. Painted this guy earlier this year. As he is currently part of the Fractured Dimensions Kickstarter, this seemed like a good time to post some pics. Sculpted by Pedro Navarro. Slightly modified as detailed here.