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Found 2 results

  1. So hear is a loaded cannon for every one; How do you paint fabric to make it look realistic. I personally tend to build up many layers of highlights and shadows and that how I do fabric, I may free hand a designee on but that really about it. I've notice wile going threw some of last years winners for reaper con that some of the fabric was painted in a almost stippled effect and it look more like a hand stitched/hand made dress or tabard. I have been trying to replicate this with no avail what so ever and going back threw old work I seem to have gotten something close back when I was learning to paint and I have no idea what I did to get that textured look. Any advice out there on how to get this look?
  2. Upon priming and placing my Bones Great Worm on a temporary working base I came to notice something that didn't fully occur to me beforehand. My normal working base choice is the lid to a dip can; awful habit, I know, but the tins make great rinse reservoirs and the lids are great for basing and a crude dry palette... I digress. Anyway, I ended up mounting the worm on a beverage bottle, which placed on my desk, and me seated in front of said desk, brought Mr. Worm to about eye level. I noticed that his model casts a pretty serious shadow on a fair portion of the front of his body, something I knew, but didn't really notice to what degree until I was looking at him eye-to-maw. So! My question is, for models that cast their own shadow, how do you approach shading that area? I can think of two basic approaches here. Either A: I ignore the fact that he's creating his own shade, and treat the entire underside uniformly, or B: I can move him and the light around until I get something I like, mentally bookmark it or even outline it, and actively paint-shade that area, so that no matter what light this guy is viewed in or from what angle, he'll appear to be casting shade on himself. Or of course, C: somewhere in between. TL;DR, would you shade areas 1 and 2 in this picture the same or differently?