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  1. I'm going to try again here, and just leave a link to my channel. I have almost 100 videos at this point, and have covered a lot of stuff. Production is improving with each video. I'm a one man operation whom started filming about a year ago. So, you will realize very quickly that the newer videos are much clearer, more in-camera, and concise. Patrons are 3 weeks ahead of the regular release schedule. I release a new video every week. Ghools' Channel
  2. A lot of times, I see people asking for advice on how to do a conversion, or expressing uncertainty about having the skills to do one. So, I decided to create (what I hope will be) a helpful topic to cover that area. I'm aiming this primarily at beginners, or those that 'don't think they can', but hopefully everyone will find something useful or interesting here. First off, let's dispel the 'I can't/I'm not good enough' myth. Nonsense! If you can operate simple mechanical devices, you have all the skills you need to perform simple conversions. It's easy and fun, all it takes is some practice. Just remember, you're going to want to practice on some inexpensive figures before you start in on anything really crazy. Bones figures are great for this. So, here's what you'll need: 1.A hobby knife with a new blade--new blades are easier to use, and safer. Caution: these are sharp, please be careful. 2.Some green stuff, or whatever type of sculpting putty you prefer. This will be used for filling gaps and/or sculpting new details. 3.Some victims volunteers figures you want to convert. In this case, I'm going to be using some Bones Goblins (remember the practice on inexpensive figures part?) for 2 reasons; they're cheap, and I have a horde of them and don't like having a bunch of clones on the table top. 4.Super Glue; the stuff in my picture is the best that I've found for working on Bones, and it's not too shabby on other materials, either. There are many other types out there; find the one that works the best for you. 5.Something to pin parts with; in this case I'm using paperclips. They're plenty strong enough for what I'll be doing. Again there are a lot of things you can use, go with what works for you. I use brass rod for bigger and/or metal miniatures; it's stronger. Not pictured: A razor saw for cutting metal figures. Mine is missing right now, but the one I use is made by X-Acto. 6. A drill and bits for making holes for pinning your figures. 7. A bits box. This is where you keep all of your spare parts for conversions. I've got around a dozen of these things, all full of weapons, shields, body parts, and all sorts of other things.If you buy a figure that has different head or weapon options, the pieces you decided not to use go into your bits box. Got a figure that you've already cut the head and both arms off of to use elsewhere? Keep it. You might want those boots for something next summer. Never throw anything away. Here we go! The first conversion will be a simple weapon swap; a spear into a halberd. Here, you can see I cut off the spear head in order to replace it with something else. This brings up a good rule: try to find a 'seam' to make your cuts at, if possible. Here, the 'seam' is where the head of the spear meets the shaft. Other good 'seams' are wrists, especially if there is a sleeve/gauntlet/wristband that will provide a guide for cutting and leave a nice flat space to attach the new part. Not quite as good of a seam here, mostly because the top of the hand/fist isn't entirely flat. It's still a very good spot to use for weapon swaps, though. (I'm sorry, I forgot to take pictures of these guys, but you can see them completed in the group pictures down below.) Now, let's do some shield swaps. This is the spear goblin. What I want you to notice here is that I was careful to cut the shield off in such a way that the straps were left intact on the goblins arm. Sure, you can just chop the shield off however you want to, but: a) you'll have to re-sculpt those straps, so why make extra work for yourself, and b) that shield might come in handy somewhere else. Never throw anything away. Here he is with his new shield: : This is he mace goblin; I couldn't get a decent shot with his shield removed. This shows the new shield in place. Note that I made certain to preserve the straps on the shield arm again. And from the front: 'Wait a minute!' I hear you cry, 'I just started this hobby 5 minutes ago, I don't have a bits box with lots of neat stuff in it for me to do conversions with' No problem, the next 2 are for you. These 2 goblins got a literal weapon swap. I cut the weapons off (again, I tried to do the cutting at a 'seam') of each figure and reattached them to the other figure. And here they are all glued back together: The sharp eyed among you will notice that the bottom of the spear is a slightly different color than the rest. I accidentally cut into the bottom portion when i was trying to clean up the points where it was attached to the figure.(See? I make mistakes, too. No matter, carry on! That's why we're practicing.) I used a little bit of modeling putty to smooth it out. These next 2 are actually the first 2 that I did, before it occurred to me to document the process for others, so I don't have in progress shots of them.They are included just to provide more examples of what can be done in a few minutes. You'll notice that these fellows have some green stuff on them. The goblin on the left has had his arm from the elbow down swapped with one from a pathfinder goblin. I made some wrappings out of GS to hide the join between the 2 parts. The goblin on the right had his shield and arm from the elbow down removed and the arm from the first goblin grafted on. The 2 parts did not align very well, so I gave him a chain mail sleeve from GS to hide the join. Detail of the added armor. And finally, here they are all together. Added weapon, swapped spear for mace,swapped shield, changed weapon tip pathfinder goblin arm, shield swap, weapon swap, swapped mace for spear Was this useful/helpful/informative for you? Is there anything I could do better? Is this something that you'd like to see me continue doing? Please note that I made this an open thread; I'm not the only person that does this, and I am by no means a master at it. If you've got some tips/tricks to add please do so. Step-by-step pictures of what you're working on would be great; I'm still learning, too! I hope that this inspires at least one person to give converting a try.
  3. We are doing a video tutorial series on how we have been painting figures. The past couple years we have been working out a way for those who are inept (like me) and those who are adept (like Christie) to be able to paint figures fast, and well enough that they look good in person and in a photo. We have made substantial progress incorporating and modifying techniques we have learned from others (many on these forums, classes at reaper-con, etc.) Here is out latest video, step two of our pre-shading process. Feedback and questions always welcome!
  4. So people have been talking about airbrushing again, and since being on the hangout, I was wondering if anyone would be interested in a live tutorial? I did some research with the help of the First Lady Thing & and the Forum Mascot, and it seems that the noise levels of needed equipment is low enough to not bother my household, or overpower the audio of the hangouts. (I can airbrush inside due to my airbrush station...) If people were interested, I would try to schedule it for a Friday or Saturday night, around 9pm EST. I would start with the basics, this is an airbrush, these are the parts of an airbrush. This is how I mix paint How I spray the paint How I control the spray of paint HOW I CLEAN THE AIRBRUSH Etc etc etc I think that people might be less intimidated by airbrushes if they could see something done live, and be able to ask questions. .. Disclaimer! I am NOT an expert, but would be more than willing to impart my meager knowledge... Maybe some experts could show us things as well. .. So chime in if you are interested! George Link for class, 7/1/2016: https://hangouts.google.com/hangouts/_/ldkk52klardgzouzdquzheyj7ye?hl=en&authuser=0 Class is over for 6/24/2016 Class is over for 7/1/2016 People are still hanging out as of 11pm est..... ***Wondering If anyone would be interested in my reprising this?***
  5. What could be a more essential wargaming terrain piece than the common hill? No matter what period, no matter what setting, hills will be featured. They add visual interest and tactical complexity to any gaming surface, may it be modular boards, gaming mats or just a green table-cloth. They may be an essential piece of gaming terrain, but making naturalistic looking hills that not only allow easy placement of models, but also easy placement and removal of trees or other terrain features, can be a challenge. In this post I show you my take on such hills and try to solve some of the problems one may encounter by using the fantabulous power of magnets *gasp*! Obviously this tutorial can also be used for terrain boards. Over hill and lofty mountain – how to make magnetised wargaming hills
  6. Anybody have any tips, or know of any good tutorials for painting gems? I have a lot of figures with little gems on them and I'm just not sure how to get the gems to really stand out. The small surface area of the gems in particular makes it difficult for me. (Being a noob doesn't help, but figured a good tut might at least get me trying the right way!) As always, thanks in advance for any assistance!
  7. EDITED: I tried to fix the pics since the originals were on photobucket. Apologies if they're a bit off! Ok, face painters! Have you always wondered how to get nice smooth skin blend? I'm going to do my best to take you step by step through a face. I could probably be persuaded to also move on to other skin areas, but let's start simple. Now, while snapping photos I realized this blending is not going to be as neat and clean as I usually like it because the photoing process did interfere with a few layers. But, we'll get it smooth in the end! Are you ready?! First things first: A large model, to better illustrate what we're doing! And our materials. We have Yephima, cloud giantess, a W&N #2, and RMS paint! I used fair skin as my flesh color, and I'm going to shade with porcelain rose and spattered crimson and highlight with pure white. This should give us a nice warm flesh tone. I'll also use walnut brown on the eyes. After snapping this, I also realized I wanted blue eyes- so I added ashen blue for the iris. Porcelain is a retired color. You can sub punk rock pink or just mix spattered with white and it'll work just fine. But I had it, and I like it, and if I keep using it, maybe reaper will bring it back! 1. Step 1: basecoat the face with fair skin. Hey! My model has a little face blemish! Oh no! What can I do to fix this? Never fear, face painters! Just take a little bit of brush-on sealer and cover the blemish with a nice layer, and it will smooth out. You can then put another layer of basecoat on top. I did a total of 3 layers of flesh, mainly because I forgot to wash this model and I had some adherence issues on the chest. 2. Step 2: The eyes! Line with walnut. Doesn't have to be perfect. You can always touch up with flesh. Paint the sclera white. Pure white probably isn't as good as linen or leather white, but I'm trying to limit our palette. Add the iris- ashen blue, as you can see. Here's where we pick the direction of gaze and try to make the eye "look" in the same direction. Takes some practice to figure our what works and what you like. Again, if paint goes where you don't want it, just touch up. Hmmn... I could have sworn I took one with just the blue... at any rater, after the blue is down add the walnut brown pupil. Then dot the pupil with white. Sorry, that back eye is hard to see. Usually there's an easy eye and a hard eye. Some people start with the hard eye. I start with the easy eye, so at least one will look the way I want! 3. Step 3: Breathe. Don't forget to breath again now that the eyes are done! 4. Step 4: Shading. This is a lot messier because I'm pausing to photo- sorry! First I lay down a thin glaze of spattered crimson all the way to the edge of the walnut, then clean the brush and just smooth the edge out using a damp brush and some feathering type strokes. Thin is better. See how nice and translucent this layer is? You can easily see the flesh underneath. I went back in with a thin glaze of my flesh to reclaim some of that cheekbone from the shadow. Then proceeded to put some crimson on the side of the nose and smooth it out. I really tried to catch each specific step. But- you can see how thin the layer is, then how it smooths with a damp brush. I usually do a few layers of this and reclaim my flesh with a thin glaze if I feel I have too much shadow tone. The crimson will mesh nicely with the walnut so that it looks like she has nice intense Maybelline lashes! Er- probably don't want quite this much contrast with a male face. If I were doing this on a male model, I'd pick something like ruddy brown to line the eyes. More soon!
  8. Bob in the role as Tim The Enchanter. I saw parts of the movies, seeing Bob throwing fire around and knew I need a Fireball for him. :-) Small Fireball Tutorial: 01. Get a ~0,65mm needle and glue a small plastic bead on it. Some have balls at the end. 02. For the fire around the needle and the ball I used a small hotgluegun trying not to get a to smoothed surface. 03. After the hotglue was cold I tried with the hot a more uneaven surface on the hotglue, again. 04. I drilled a 0,65mm hole in the hand. (better use a hand drilling tool, not a machine!) 05. Bended the needle a little bit 06. used 2-epoxy-glue to glue it in the hand 07. to make it sure it does not change the position I put the fireball on something. 08. painted it white 09. painted it yellow 10. painted it orange 11. painted it red while orange is wet 12. painted it black on the jet near the hand while orange and red are wet
  9. So - this is my first time "painting fire". It's not bad, but it's not good either... Advice for how to do it better next time? PS. I know that this figure is supposed to be a water creature, but I "made it work" to be a fire elemental lady who's an "ash mage" of sorts or whatever...
  10. So I was asked to do a tutorial on how I painted the marble on my Coraldrax [seen here: http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/54577-coraldrax-sea-kaladrax/ ] like I did with my tutorial on painting rust: http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/56249-siris-guide-to-painting-rust/ So here we go! This isn't going to be as good as my rust tutorial I think, it's using acrylics [since that's how I did it on Coraldrax, and I wanted to show how I did that] and really on Coraldrax it's barely visible underneath him, so I didn't worry about doing a pretty job with it. However, I think it can easily be done with hobby paints instead of craft, and be done much nicer than the way I do it, by using the same basics as i'll show below So I decided to use two flat surfaces, which are two half objective markers from my Secret Weapon Bag O' Crap and another base from the same Bag O' Crap that could pull off the marble look and actually has texture The colors I use are white, a light gray, a medium gray, and a very very dark green called Wrought Iron. I have black there as well, but I didn't use it My first step is to cover them completely in the medium gray color Then you use white and streak in the same direction. I usually go from one corner to the opposite corner. Don't be worried if the lines are fuzzy or blotchy or thick. Marble is seldom symmetrical and perfect, and this is just the base coat you're applying Now I break out my light grey and do the same thing, streaking in the same direction. This helps clean up your white lines a bit, and blend them a bit better so it's not so stark This next step will look very messy. Don't get discouraged! You're going to use a very small brush and your dark color. In my case, that is Wrought Iron. Your'e going to make spidery veins in the same direction as your streaking [you will notice I screwed up on one of my objective markers and went against the streaks >.< ] You'll want to dip your brush often, because plenty of paint means it doesn't get fuzzy edges. We want lots of crisp lines Now you'll go back to your light grey and white. I tend to mix them in even parts, and then dry brush it over the entire thing. At this stage, you don't HAVE to follow the streaking, but I still do anyways just because. This makes the veins fade Using pure white, we streak once more. Be careful not to entirely cover up your faded veins of dark color Now you're going to apply dark veins once more. You'll want them very thin, very crisp. If you look at pictures of marble, you'll see plenty of them have both faded and crisp lines through them And you're done! A final seal gets us our final marble look. As I said, a bit messy, a bit imperfect...but I'm sure with this tutorial you can get the basic marble look down and then improve on my own technique =) Finished markers: Finished little base:
  11. Hiho, to add some variety to the gaming table and depict some smaller shrubs I wrote a tutorial detailing how to go about making shrubs and brushes for both 15mm and 28mm. I went for hazel bushes this time as they have a distinct bark and also allow to decorate the bases with some hazelnuts and squirrels ;). A step-by-step tutorial and plenty of pictures can be found on my blog: Squirrly Goodness – Making Hazel Shrubs for 28mm and 15mm Here is the final result:
  12. A few years ago I did a quick tutorial of painting red hair with Reaper's red hair triad. Since then I have painted quite a few more red heads and hopefully am better at it. The first tutorial http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/46120-tutorial-for-the-red-head-triad/ used mainly just the red hair triad with a few other colors to give it some depth. I wanted to expand upon the first and still focus on the red hair triad. So here are the colors I selected to use for my victims. Here are the three victims freshly primed and waiting to cure a bit before painting. From left to right the miniatures are Dark Sword's Female Mage DSM1192, Reaper's Dain Deepaxe 77074 and Reaper's Valloa Female Elf Thief 03566. I don't usually prime my bones minis but I did put a quick layer of Tamiya primer on him so I can paint with thinner paint. I plan to paint one of them a deeper auburn and one a bright orangish red. The third will be hopefully somewhere in between. Any and all input is welcome. This will be how I paint red hair and hopefully give some of the newer painters ideas of how to approach red.
  13. Hey reaper mini forum! Got another beginner video about basing your miniatures! Please give any feedback regarding the content/video :)
  14. This is a Young Forest Dragon I painted last year. You can find my video tutorial for the painting project here: http://www.mageknightkevin.blogspot.ca/2014/11/video-tutorial-painting-green-dragon.html Kevin in Edmonton http://www.mageknightkevin.blogspot.ca
  15. This is Jason Wiebe's Dire Bear sculpt. Really like this figure. I've posted a short video tutorial for the painting of this figure here: http://www.mageknightkevin.blogspot.ca/2014/11/video-tutorial-painting-reapers-dire.html Kevin in Edmonton http://www.mageknightkevin.blogspot.ca
  16. Hey folks! People have been talking in different threads about Static Grass and Flock, and that they are either afraid to use them, or worried that when they are done, it wont look right. I am no expert, but I have based quite a few figures for Tabletop war-games such as Flames of War. I am one of those people who absolutely HATES to put unfinished figures on the Tabletop. In fact, I don't even bring unfinished figures to games, unless it is something like an escalation league... So here we go! First, What is this Stuff? Static Grass is some kind of fiber that holds static electricity to help it 'stand up' when applied to a base with some type of glue. It comes in many lengths, colors and blends from many different companies. Flock, or Flocking is some sort of foam, as far as I can tell. It is designed to mimic low vegetation and earth. It also comes in many grades, from fine to coarse, many different colors, from many different companies. Grass Tufts, or Tufts are basically pre-made clumps of Static Grass of different Colors and heights, often mixed together, and glued down in places where a bit of grass is needed, not a whole field or lawn. They come on sheets of plastic that you peel them off. Again many colors, heights, and companies. Some examples: Static Grasses This is Wild Grass, Light Beige, and is a taller (5mm vs 2mm) static Grass Harvest Gold Static Grass. 2mm This is the first type of Static Grass I ever used. It was originally packaged for Military Modelers. Farm Pasture Blend. This is a mix of Static Grass, Flock, and tiny pieces of Cork. This is called Meadow Blend, and is also Static Grass and Flock mixed. It has little bits of RED turf in it. They look like little flowers from Tabletop distance. This stuff is called 'Dead Fall Debris' and had quite a bit of stuff that was way to big for our purposes. I sifted out the big stuff, and put the smaller stuff in an old Parmesan Cheese shaker. Not sure if this is a blend of my own or a professional product.. Edit-->This is a mix of the long and short Beige Grasses, with the meadow blend. There being little tall Beige (less than an 1/8th), maybe a 1/4 of the blend is the short Beige Grass, the rest being the Meadow blend. This definitely my own Blend. It is called 'Tree Mix' because it is what I use when basing all the different trees for the tabletop games. Turfs: Tufts: These are 6 different colors and heights of Grass Tufts. This is a sampling from things that I have at hand, There are so many different types of this stuff that it would take it's own server to show all of it. That said, there are a couple of good model railroad supply companies with websites where you can see the variety of products. OK, you say what good is all this stuff? Well, I'll show you a few different uses for it. As I mentioned above, I play a Tabletop Miniature war-game called Flames of War. It is a Company level game in 15mm scale. The force levels are similar to what you would find in 40k. The biggest difference is that for infantry, you will normally have 3-5 figures per base, as opposed to one per base. (Think Froggy's Meerkat Army) Some examples: These 1st 2 are both US .30 caliber Machine gun teams. In fact 2 of the 3 figures on each base are the same. But notice the differences in the colors and amount of vegetation on each base. The 1st base is for my 3rd Armored Division troops fighting in Normandy and other parts of France after D Day. The 2nd base is for my 3rd Infantry Division troops fighting in Italy in 1943-44. Notice the green of France's hedgerow country versus the stony hillsides of Italy. People have used different flocks and such on bases to identify different platoons in the same company. More than one person actually used different colors of flock/turf/tuft Flowers to do this! This base is for my German Panzer Lehr force, also fighting in Normandy. It isn't the same as the #rd Armored base, but the mix of colors is the same. This is a Machine Gun Nest that I tried to make usable in either locale. These are some other pieces with bases and vehicles: This is my Beer Truck objective. (2nd place, Flames of War Objective, Historicon 2013) And an over-sized objective from 'Death Traps', a book about the 3rd Armored Division in France during WWII. So you can see that using these materials can change the look of your figures tremendously. Next installment will be some actual work in progress stuff. You can look at my DDS 2 thread if you are impatient. There are pics of me applying flock to the terrain pieces. Oh yeah, anyone out there ever see a movie called 'Kelly's Heroes'? Here is Oddball and his tank! Comments Welcome! Questions Too! 8) George
  17. So I was asked to do a step by step tutorial on how I did the rust on my Wyrmgear [located here: http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/56248-77177-rusty-wyrmgear/ ] so this morning I did just that with three of my Secret Weapon bases from my Bag O' Crap. I hope you find it useful! Here's the three I chose, washed and ready to be painted. Six paints are used [pictured] and two brush sizes [pictured] So first I cover them in brown liner and let that dry Next, I dab at it with my Ancient Bronze. Throughout this whole tutorial, I dab with my brushes. It's a bit rough on the brushes, I recommend using slightly ratty ones you don't mind getting a bit worse. I dab using the side of the bristles, not the ends, but it still is a bit rough on the brush. You don't want to entirely cover the base, but do a decent amount of area in bronze. you'll cover most of it up later, but it gives you a brighter surface to put rust on than the brown liner. I did varying degrees of bronze on the three bases Now you'll add your base rust on the bases, using an orange. I used Lava Orange. Again, i dabbed with my brush. I find it gives a more organic and sporadic feel than brushing the paint on. You'll want to leave the underlying colors visible in areas. This is all about layering the colors to make a glorious mess of colors now you add some dark areas to your rust. I found Bloodstain Red to be great for this! You'll again want to leave areas of orange peeking through. Don't be afraid to use a paper towel and wipe at areas of your base as you go, to get a gritty or smeared look. I did this heavily on the smallest [middle] base below Now I go back over some areas with the Lava Orange to bring out a bit of brighter spots that got covered up too much by the red Now we're going to use a metallic silver, in my case Shadowed Steel, to give a hint of underlying, un-rusted metal beneath that rust. You'll put this over the areas that you left the rust off of, where the dark brown liner is still visible. Don't be afraid if you end up doing too much silver, you can go back over it easily to rust it up. Even though you're actually putting this ON TOP of the rust colors, when you dab with your brush the contrast of shiny to not shiny will make it look underneath, like so: Now we use the small brush that I haven't touched yet for this tutorial. Yellow will add some realistic color to the orangey red rust, but you don't want too much. My yellow doesn't like to put out paint so i have to take the cap off and dip my brush in the cap, so I usually end up with a thick yellow. I deal with this by wiping it gently with a paper towel after dabbing small amounts onto the bases This is a touch up step, where you apply small amounts of orange and red. I did this because I felt that the effect I wanted wasn't completely there, and i needed some more rust over the silver. At this point, I'm rather unhappy with the manhole cover, because it's complicated, textured surface is making it difficult to get the effect I want We pull back out the Ancient Bronze now, to add some shiny rust effect to the duller rust. You can note the difference especially on the manhole cover We use the brown liner again! We're nearing completion. I use the brown liner to imitate dirt, shadows, and to get detail to pop. I put it into the detailed areas of my Wyrmgear's base, the cracks in the metal for example, and wipe away the excess to leave only the dark gap filled We go back to the yellow, because I felt that i had gone too dark again. I went a bit heavy with the yellow on the man hole cover, especially the letters, in an attempt to bring the color up a bit. We're done now, save for some small steps I used Pure Black to go around the edges to cover the paint strokes and to give it a neat look. This actually helped the manhole cover immensely, I think Final sealant coat! I love how sealing them brings the colors out. We're done! I hope everyone finds this tutorial useful for doing heavily rusted bases/miniatures! You can easily adapt this to do less-rusted stuff by increasing the amount of visible metal underneath =) Look up pictures of rust, it's very useful. Rust is so colorful, there is so much variation in it, and my frustration with my Wyrmgear that resulted in me painting him rusty was a boon in disguise because I hadn't realized just how much fun rust was to paint and how beautiful it can be
  18. Hi all, I just wrote a short tutorial on my experiences with taking scenic photos of my miniatures. I look at camera choices, lighting, framing, scene composition and photo editing. In a second installment I will move from the general to the specific and provide a step-by-step tutorial for one specific shot. Here is the link. Some of my work:
  19. I made a step-by-step of how I painted the above logo. It was linked to a Google+ album but since it might be difficult for some to follow, and hoping those of you who want to do freehand but feel it would be too complicated will find it useful and realize how crappy it looks at the beginning, and how you need to stay with it and refine the whole thing Step 1: This is our canvas, the right shoulder of the Szalamandra TAG. I am going to paint the Szalamandra Squadron Logo on it, as seen on the miniature box. Step 2: I take paint and my Raphael #0 brush, and test brushstrokes to get an idea of the "flow" of the logo. Step 3: First pass of Vallejo Model Color Deck Tan, which I will use as base color for the logo. I start by outlining the circle, using very thin paint. Step 4: Using thin, thin paint, you make sure it is dry and make more passes to build opacity and smoothness. Step 5: After 3 passes, I have a base shape to work with. Do not be afraid to mess up, we will correct and refine this (and all!) shapes later. You can see how I messed up the front of the circle. This issue, and me correcting it, will make the logo look crooked and off-center in the end :( Step 6: First pass of defining the interior shapes of the logo. Step 7: It was looking like a blob of Deck Tan, so I used a mix of my base color (Black + Vallejo Game Air Sombre Grey), slightly on the darker side, to trace the interior lines and break it up. Ugly, using it? We just need to keep at it, and don't give up. Step 8: More correcting with the dark color on the edges... painting the negative space is very important to get sharp, thinner lines. Already looking more like the Szally logo! Step 9: Further refining with Deck Tan and the base mix, in several passes.
  20. So Kuro is recording video! So cool. In his WIP thread, a side discussion about shooting video came up, so I thought it might be nice to have a thread on the topic. Recording, equipment, software, setups; there is a lot that goes into making videos! I did find a thread on software from a couple years back, so there's a starter on that part of the process, but it would be nice to have the different technical aspects in one spot.
  21. Don't know what happened to Doug's Miniature Photography 101 thread that was in here, but I feel this is a very valid thing to have in this area. Found this today while surfing the web and thought it'd be very useful for a lot of us who try to take pics of our figures: TUTORIAL: BEGINNERS GUIDE TO MINIATURE PHOTOGRAPHY
  22. I drilled a hole in a 10x10mm piece of wood. I used first a 5.5mm drill, but needed to make it bigger, I'm not sure if I used a 6.0mm or 6.5mm drill. You can put a dome in the hole and use the wood on sand paper. Don't use to much pressure on it! The piece of wood should not touch the sandpaper! You must end with it before it the sandpaper touch the wood! Check sometimes if you are satisfied with the size before it is to short! On the backside is a small hole to remove the dome. Do not use something to pointy. :-)
  23. I watch yesterday a nice idea in theDMsCraft videos. I was thinking how to do it without having a paper board in the backside. And here is what I got: It is my first try, but I think it could be really good looking with little practice. If you want to do it you need: 1. watch the video below 2. use paper you can eat. It is not really paper. 'Rice paper', 'edible paper' or 'edible waver paper'? 3. do it similiar to the video on the , let some space between the spiral lines 4. put it in warm, not hot water, you can remove it very fast. 5. Do the same lines on the backside [didn't have done it yet] 6. eventuall paint it.
  24. This stuff is probably WAY beneath the skill level of most people here, but I decided to put up a series of basic YouTube videos about getting minis tabletop-ready. I'm still fiddling with the best format and setup to use. The first couple are online now: Episode 1
  25. So I was commenting on one of Willen's threads and promised I'd post some of my thoughts on blending. Feathering is one of the primary blending techniques I use, and the below is the basic gist of it. Keep in mind that this is a really quick and dirty tut, so it's not the prettiest painting I've ever done, but it should get the idea across. The basic technique comes from the class I took from Rhonda Bender (Wren) at Reapercon 2013. Anything useful you find here should be credited to her; anything that totally destroys your paintjob should be blamed on my poor understanding of her techniques. (And Rhonda, please feel free to correct/suggest/etc if you see this!) I'm painting on a Bones Bathalian figure. My paints are all RMS: Military Grey (HD), Ghost White and Nightmare Black. First up: the basecoat. It's just a few smooth layers of Military Grey built up to an appropriate opacity/saturation. Next, the first layer of feathering. I'm using about a 50/50 mix of Ghost White and water to make this layer: I'm using much starker gradients than usual so the technique is very apparent; if you look at the top fold in this photo, you can see an initial layer that I would normally put down (it's Concrete Grey, I think, from the HD line), but it's subtle enough you can't see the brushstrokes...which is the idea, but doesn't help illustrate the idea. As you can see, the brushstrokes are perpendicular to the peak of the fold. You can also think of this in relation to the gradient, to the direction of dark to light. If your gradient is bands of color in order from dark to light, the feathering stroke runs perpendicular to those bands of color. This was the most counterintuitive part of what Rhonda taught us, but it is well worth the brain-bending! The stroke starts as close to the "dark" as it can (without losing the midtone) and pulls up to the brightest peak. In the photo above, the brushstroke moves upward. The reason for this is that paint tends to leave the brush at the end of the stroke more than at the beginning, so your featherstroke is naturally creating a gradient by concentrating the pigment at the top of the fold. With fairly gentle folds like these, you'll do this from both sides of the fold (with pleats, or heavy creases, you'll only use one side, usually, since the other side of the peak is in deep shadow). Here's an image of the same layer: There are strokes from left to right and from right to left, meeting at the peak of the fold (shown in the inset by the red line; this is the line that will end up with the most light). Next, I do the same thing for the shadows. Again, about a 50/50 mix of water and paint, this time with Nightmare Black. Brushstrokes still move toward the point of greatest pigment (for shadows, that's the deepest part of the fold). SO, at this point, things look pretty rough. So what's next? Next is a glaze. I mix about a 70/30 water/basecoat puddle of color and smoothly cover the whole area. In a lot of ways, this is like a wash, but I want to wick enough off my brush before touching the mini that it brushes off rather than pooling. I want to cover the whole area, both shadow and light, with a unifying, nearly transparent, layer of the basecoat color. Here you can see the Ghost White has been knocked down quite a bit and the Nightmare Black has come up a bit. The feather-strokes are starting to fade into the midtone. I may apply several layers of the glaze at this point, and I may apply it in specific places rather than globally, until I have a smooth look. Next, I'll go back in with the highlight and pull it up again, this time in a smaller area than before: The glaze down/pull back up may happen several times, depending on how smooth I want it. Generally, the more times you glaze and reapply, the smoother your gradient will get. I'll do this with the shadows, too, of course. Other fun tricks are using a glaze that isn't your midtone to globally shift the color a bit, for example giving a basic grey a hint of teal, or skewing the shadows of a blue into purple. Also, once you get used to making tiny brushstrokes like this technique requires, playing with the kind of rough-woven textures that Derek frequently uses gets easier. For some examples of this technique fully realized, I invite you to check out these paintjobs of mine. I'm not a master by any stretch, but these have all been painted with my understanding of the technique. Charnel Grub - My low-to-mid display level. Deathstalker - Armypainting. Meant to be high-contrast to show up well on the table. Phoenicia - Near-competition quality. She was at Reapercon '14 and was nearly the piece the judges looked at, so I'm guessing she would have picked up either a Certificate or a Bronze if I'd just entered her (the piece they did pick brought a silver). I hope this has been useful to someone. If anyone has questions or comments please feel free. Specific to Willen: we were talking about wet-blending and 2-Brush Blending in your thread. I don't know enough about 2BB to say for sure, but I suspect the perpendicular brushstroke could be useful for pulling pigment the way you want to in 2BB. For wet-blending, if you can start putting the next feather-layer down while the glaze is still wet you can get some really smooth transitions.