Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'werewolf'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Reaper Discussion
    • FAQs 'n Stuff
    • News
    • Reaper General
    • Chronoscope
    • Bones Miniatures & Legendary Encounters
    • ReaperCon
  • Craft Corner
    • Show Off
    • Painting Tips & Advice
    • Works In Progress
    • Speed / Army / Tabletop Techniques
    • Shutterbug
    • Conversions, Presentation, and Terrain
    • Sculpting
    • Mini Exchanges and Paint Contests
  • Reaper Games
    • CAV
    • Warlord
  • General Discussion
    • General Fantasy
    • General Sci-Fi
    • General Modern / Historical
    • Kickstarter
    • Off-Topic Rampancy
  • The Sandbox
    • The Gathering
    • The Playing
    • Fiction, Poetry, and Other Abuses

Calendars

  • Reaper

Found 28 results

  1. This is a fresh start for a thread I feel I knocked off kilter. I feel it may be justified in that I've finally started actually painting the creature. This is Reaper's 14532: Aislinn, Shadow Tracker, a large werewolf (the base is a 40mm square) from the Koborlas faction in their Warlord game. I had a request from a player for a werewolf who can shift genders and appear gender ambiguous, and this seemed a good place to start. The sculpt is meant to be female, but it is lean and muscly and not over-bosomy. I filed it down somewhat and off we go. ... I don't seem to have done my usual practice of documenting the priming (a light coat of thinned Titanium White and a wash of Burnt Umber on the creature only, leaving the base white for snow), so here is the first layer. I decided to paint this one as a white wolf. I've observed that "white" wolves are actually a creamy light brown, so that's how I've painted this one. The color is mixed from Yellow (Iron) Oxide, Burnt Umber, a bit of Ultramarine Blue to tone down the brightness, and Titanium White. It came out a sort of dull buff, a good blonde color. The color is laid on thin and translucent. Where the Burnt Umber underneath shows the color shifts to a sort of bluish shadow. I indicated the nose, eyes, lips, and claws with Carbon Black. I don't use pure black much, but I needed a little facial indication to work from. Had a little blue on my palette, so I swished in some snow shadows. These are two mixes: Phthalo Blue with a tiny bit of Hansa Yellow Opaque and a great deal of Titanium White; and Ultramarine Blue and Titanium White.
  2. While I have been painting realistic wolves, I have also been working on some of the gorgeous giant wolfmen sculpted by Julie Guthrie for the Koborlas faction in Reaper's "Warlord" game. This is #14528, the subtly-named "Rageclaw Slayer", or the testosterone-poisoned werewolf a friend of mine requested. He's a big puppy; I include a copy of Reaper's 60164, Vampire Hunter, for scale: This is my standard priming of a thin layer of Titanium White followed by a thin wash of diluted Burnt Umber, using my favorite Golden Matte Fluid Acrylics. I left the base white in order to paint it as snow. Those who have been following my regular wolf painting thread will recognize the steps here. First I mixed a cool neutral grey from Burnt Sienna and Ultramarine Blue and Titanium White and painted it on his limbs, face, and belly: Then I mixed a darker version of the same grey and painted his back and tail: Then I mixed a cream-buff color from Burnt Sienna, Yellow Oxide, a tiny bit of Ultramarine Blue to take the orange edge off, and Titanium White, and went over his face, limbs, and belly again: And finally I took some pure Carbon Black (a color I rarely use except for special effects) and laid in his eyes, nose, lips, and claws (Although I just noticed I missed his toe claws. Oh, well, next time.). I also washed a little diluted black over his darker fur, most noticeable on the parts of the tail I had missed earlier: He still looks rough and terrible, especially up close, but I have to admit I am rather pleased with the overall color impression.
  3. This is something I've been thinking about for a friend's character. I include for posterity most of the discussion I had about it on the current Randomness thread: In the end I did a bit of gentle shaving with a fresh X-Acto blade, then filed the rest of the way. (I don't presently have Greenstuff, nor have I used it before.) This is what my copy of Aislinn looked like unmodified: And this is what Aislinn looks like now that I've tried a bit of filing. The filed areas are much shinier than the rest of the figure which seems to make them look rounder than they really are. Possibly they are not yet plausible pectoral muscles, but I'm hoping to help the effect with paint.
  4. Okay, here we go. I have this lovely Warpwolf Stalker, which I painted a while ago. I have, since I leveled up a bit, revisited the stalker. Here is the original picture: Here is the current front view (and other views) I'm really happy with the extension of what I have done with him, and I'm much happier with the figure as a whole. Any C&C is welcome, but I think I improved significantly from the initial painting to the reworking I've done on this one. C&C is welcome on this one.
  5. Hello - It's hard to tell which werewolf is the largest among the many produced by Reaper. I'm looking for a very large model for a future game. Thanks in advance for your help!
  6. So I painted up this little lady a month or two ago now, and I've had some fights with her... But now she's based and I've decided what the hell, I'm done with her. Now this is my paladin from my pathfinder group =] she's a half-drow pally with a serious justice thing going on, and also, she's a werewolf, because why not =] Now, she's got an overly huge halberd on her, because my conversions were a bit dodgier in the beginning with regards to scale. I'll probably replace her at some point, because I'm not 100% on her for my character in truth, but what do. For the time being, she's fun enough =] As a werewolf though, I of course needed to get her a werewolf mini! I'm not really into the more humanoid wolf/man type werewolves though, as I tend to find them too muscly and stuff... So I grabbed a Bones Warg instead for her. This was in the fact the very first mini I ever painted, under Drifter's guidance and she's only just gotten based, hence she's not shown up before. So there's Caelan the Pally, in both her lovely forms Now... Paints. Arghh, it's been a while, and right now I'm at Drifter's, so I can't actually access my stack of paints to double check them, so here goes... Kristianna is painted with... GW: Nuln Oil Seraphim Sepia Khorne Red The Blue Glaze that I can't remember the name of right now Fenrisian Grey Auric Armour Leadbelcher White Scar Pallid Wych Flesh or Flayed One Flesh, I honestly can't remember Drakenhof Nightshade And she's got some P3 too: Cold Steel Bloodtracker Brown Umbral Umber The Warg, on the other hand, is painted with... GW: Standard Mechanicus Grey Khorne Red Abaddon Black Nuln Oil White Scar ... I think. I dunno, I'll be honest, it was months ago and it was Drifter's paints ^^; But yush, there we go. A post from me, while I'm away xD but yay, I've learned to base things a bit now, so hopefully everything in future will be more nicely finished These two have Army Painter tufts and turf on them, and sand taken from the beach at Drifter's (because the sand on my beach is kinda icky). Also, bonus fun fact: We found the Raging Heroes Kickstarter for TGG2 today. I just blew £93 on it *facepalm* Ahhh well... What do, eh?
  7. As has been a theme this year, the minis I manage to paint will all count towards the resolutionary challenge. As per the resolutionary painting challenge guidelines, I will post them here, and link in my post in the challenge thread. When Mantic ran their very first kickstarter, they pumped out stretch goal after stretch goal with concept drawings, riding on a wave of success they did not anticipate. Some of these drawings created a lot of buzz, such as this really great werewolf: and when the minatures arrived and were unveiled there was much of wailing and gnashing of teeth. I actually do not think they are all that bad, but then again, they are not as good as the concept drawing. I expect the prime reason for this is the miniatures are multi-pose, with ball-socket arms and head. And in restic, which the vocal internet has decided to hate. I have done six of my nine werewolves earilier, time for the final three: I posed this one to be like in the drawing The Dwarf having a lie down is an extra from one of the plastic Dwarf sprues from Mantic and they are so easy to paint! Woof Woof!
  8. Another couple of the Dungeons and Dragons Boardgame models today. The Zombie Dragon and the Werewolf. Both are decent sculpts, though nothing outstanding by my standards. The Zombie Dragon is a reasonable beast, though details are a little soft in places. It's also undersized to my eye, for a dragon at least. Dragonling perhaps, but not a full fledged dragon, undead or otherwise. A zombie dragon is, apparently a distinct thing from a Dracolich. I guess that's a Dragon who is a Lich, rather than a Dragon who is a Zombie. I guess perhaps Dracoliches can be the ones who animate Zombie Dragons. I've still got to finish painting the Dracolich that came with Ravenloft, so enough about that for now. Since this thing is (or used to be) a Dragon(ling), and also a Zombie, I went for a kind of traditional green palette, knowing I could stay dark on the carapace while highlighting the majority of the skin to a really pallid, desaturated green, so the carapace and wing membranes would provide a harmonious contrast. Of course, the other contrast that I wanted to have nice and strong was that of the blood, gore, viscera, exposed muscle and so on. The beast doesn't look like it's been dead for all that long, as there's not a huge amount of decomposition on the model so far. I mean, the details are pretty soft, so it's easy enough to go other way, but I thought the head looked a little sallow as opposed to being made up of exposed bone. This is why I painted the eyes as hollowed-out but bloodied sockets. As though the crows and carrion-eaters had picked them out of the skull, before reanimation had occurred.The midsection and exposed ribs were again a bit soft, so I used some tube-putty to create some intestines hanging out of the chest/midsection cavity, along with a relatively fresh trail of viscera and blood being left in its stride. All of the exposed wounds were finished with Tamiya Clear Red, and the trail of dripping gore was made up of the same Clear Red along with some Water Effects. The Werewolf also, is a simple figure. Again on a par with an average Bones model. Very much a 5/10 sculpt and model, in my opinion. I went for grey rather than brown, since grey rather than brown wolves and werewolves fit the pseudo-gothic-horror aesthetic of something like Castle Ravenloft for me. The incredibly awkward pose and posture doesn't do a whole lot for me, either. Interestingly, this werewolf is female. Though she only has two breasts, that are completely covered in fur, rather than six-to-ten teats. Not something I'd thought about much before. We all know that there are actually painters out there that really can make a silk purse from a sow's ear. I'm not sure if I consider myself one of them, but I know that I could have made this model look better than it is. The question, as always is whether it would be worth the time invested. In this case, I did a little with facial markings and called it good enough. In the end, these two are simply used as Bossed for the Ravenloft box. In theory, both could have a place in a Kings of War Undead army, though I've got better (Confrontation) Werewolves that I use for that game, and better ones from Citadel, Reaper, and even Mantic that I can use for everything else. The Zombie Dragon would need proxy-stats for a creature much less nasty than a proper Dragon to be of use. Obsidian Golem stats of some kind, perhaps?
  9. Quick work because sometimes you just need to finish something. It's not special but for an hours worth of work its a pretty good concept mini. Sorry for the poor pics but it's all I had at the time,
  10. Another on of my real oldies. Tried an albino look on this one. French company Rackham made these for their Confrontation line. Great minis, now oop, replaced by low quality plastics before the company crumbled.
  11. Big fan of werewolves. Hope you enjoy.
  12. I painted this werewolf to look like my dog Rango. He's and Australian Cattle dog aka Blue Heeler. You like?
  13. It's that time of year, to bust out your monsters and paint them.
  14. These are almost done. 77009 Werewolf: the basecoat reminded me of the maroon and tan Wolverine costume from way back. I promptly got rid of that, but I wish I hadn't. I might try to bring it out a bit at the end. I did blue veins after the basecoat, but they're pretty faded now. The highlights didn't work, but it's a step. I really like the blue eyes - they're piercing... but not too visible from this picture. 77098 Spirit: I wanted to try glow in the dark paint. I based with matte medium. Then I did about 4 coats of glow in the dark paint. It takes a really long time under a lamp to get it to glow faintly. I'm probably going to go for some more coats. It did kinda dry with a cloudy finish, though. Then I saw someone's mini with the clear tamiya, and I decided I wanted to try that. I have some artists' acrylic ink (prussian blue) that I mixed with the matte medium. I used that on the shroud. It looks pretty cool. One thing I love on my ghosts is a pale color as a drybrushed highlight. I really like how the pale blue looks in person. Not sure how close it looks in this photo. This one still needs the plastic base coloured - I'm thinking of trying matte medium with some brown ink I have. Keep things as translucent as possible. I might properly base this one later as an experiment with some Golden Pumice Gel medium.
  15. I originally ordered the worm and werewolf way before the Kickstarter. I was extremely impressed by the quality and the price. Strangely, the worm suffered from the tacky paint issue where the werewolf never did. I use the same paints and primers on everything. I have re-coated a few minis after reading a few suggestions here and found Testors Dulcote does work at coating the minis and removing the tackiness from finished models. I'll be busy painting for the next year..... EDIT: as suggested, these are the minis posted below (in order). 77006: Great Worm 77005: Ogre Chieftain 77009: Werewolf 77038: Hell Hound 89001: Pathfinder Red Dragon 77063: Duke Gerard 89003: Pathfinder Goblin Warrior 77050: Lizardman Warrior 77058: Almaran the Gold, Paladin 77143: Townsfolk: Undertaker 77158: Arrius, Skeletal Warrior
  16. Had some time yesterday so spent a few hours painting up my Bones Werewolf. I wanted to get some practice in working with the Bones material before my Kickstarter rewards arrive. (Which should be Monday or Tuesday, eeeee!) I've handled him a little bit and haven't noticed any paint coming off and sprayed him with Testors Dullcote and he's not tacky or anything. Very pleased with the Bones plastic.
  17. Disclosure: I am not a professional painter. You could probably see this by the pictures. I consider myself the typical average guy who collects and paints minis. That being said, here is my WIP pics for a few of the Bones I did. This first pic is base+some drybrushing on the owlbear and werewolf, and base only on the elemental And here is the elemental all finished up, with some minor work needed on the base and that's it.
  18. I've been painting a lot lately, just a little lazy about taking pics. This is part of a battlegroup set I recently painted which I will be posting the rest soon. I'm most proud of this one. I wish all my work came out like him. I even made the little tree/grass terrain thingy for when I finally get to play the game with my wife ...but she won't be allowed to touch the wolf :P
  19. Been away a while, stuff happened. But I did get to finish a single Bone miniature, the Werewolf. A relatively quick and easy paint job, mostly basecoat -inkwash-drybrush, also a new way (for me) of finishing the base. This looks much better than the mid green I used before. Mould lines are a problem with the Bones I have gotten my tacky paws on, as the material resists scraping and filing. The mould lines need to be sliced off, which in many cases probably will ruin more detail than just leaving them on. So here I opted to leave them for the most part, they were not that obtrusive. Look at the rignt arm for one. The angle of the pictures does not show the lines very well, they are more obvious IRL.
  20. I've been working on my Bones Werewolf Cut and Reposition and finally he's done. All C&C welcome.
  21. By way of introduction I've been wargaming for a while but nowadays I don't have too much time gaming, so I've set myself the task of improving my painting ability. I ordered the learn to paint kits but while waiting I started on the Bones Werewolf, Basecoated below. I didn't prime this guy, just washed & scrubbed before basecoating. This is my first attempt to go beyond tabletop so C&C definitely welcome I've finished shading for now, the Fur was lighter but I decided to tone it back a bit, still have teeth & claws to complete and of course the base.
  22. I have been out of the hobby for ages. Here is another one I painted in an earlier life, when drybrushing was king. It was drybrushed over a black undercoat as far as I remember, mainly old roundpot Citadel and "Miniature Paints by Gamecraft" (smell exacly the same, I belive these were made by the same manufacturer, what today sells as "Coat D'arms". Some of these paints I have with price tags dated 1998 and earlier. And they are still perfectly usable (!).
  23. I recently received 400 plastic tiles for basing many of the Bones I will be receiving from the Kickstarter. Basing all those Bones Kickstarters After testing their durability when glued straight to the model and after pinning them, I decided to crack open my Werewolf and base him for real. After staring at the figure sitting on the plastic tile for a bit, I decided I wanted to mess with the stance of the creature and change the perspective with out really cutting and repositioning the limbs and such. I did make 2 cuts, one to free the front foot from the base and then other to remove some of the excess base now on the figure. When I had that done, I used a binder clip to hold the base to the plastic tile and play with the pose of the figure by moving the now loose foot to different spots and twisting the figure. The intent being that once I had the feet glued to the base I could use some hot water to allow me to change the pose of the miniature a bit. So after playing with the pose for a bit I glued the base where I wanted it. Marker allowed me to ensure I had it in the correct spot once I removed the clamp. As you can see I moved the right foot from its original position in front of the werewolf and set it back near his left foot. This made him stand up a bit straighter but not where I eventually wanted him. So here I decided he needed a forward anchor for his right hand. With some clay, I quickly made a rough tombstone and because it was narrow and not plastic, I made pins for it and glued it in front of the Werewolf. The sand will give the edges a bit of an eroded effect when I paint it. It's VERY fine sand from a beach in Virginia. It makes really nice smooth ground when applied with super glue. Before taking him for his really hot water bath, I adhered his right hand to the tombstone and added dug some claw marks away from his claws. Then off for his bath. After a short period in the really hot water he was pliable enough to move him into position. I pulled him out of his twist to the right a bit and pushed his torso lower. Then into an ice bath while I manually held him in place. He didn't seem to mind the cold but my fingers eventually had enough. Here he is standing closer to straight and with his tail adjusted. It being damned cold outside, I let him sit on the porch out back in a small pile of snow for a bit. Just to be sure. I filled in his base after he came in from the cold and was sufficiently dry. Next, I'll prime the base and tombstone and put to the test the claims I don't need to prime the actual figure.
  24. Please forgive the really bad attempt at a light box; I was working with random materials around the house! I also tried using several different cameras. Sadly, the one on my phone seems to be the best I have access to. So, here's my werewolf pack. These are some of the first minis I've painted in the last 8-9 years or so. (technically they are the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th minis, but who's counting? :P) The first one was the rat from LTPK 1. Including the rat, these are the first minis I've ever experimented with fur on. Comments and critiques welcome!
  25. These are listed in the order in which I painted them. Purple Worm: Werewolf: Gnoll Warrior: I sure wish I hadn't messed up his face. Bugbear: I have no idea where his eyes are supposed to be. Ghost: