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Primers

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OK, let's start more shop-talk:

 

Primers, my personal fav: Krylon White Spray Primer. It goes on thin, it drys amazingly quick, and from white, I can paint any color.

 

My only problem is the propellant in spray cans destroys styrofoam in spectacular fashion.

 

Citidel's tiny pot of 'Smelly Primer' (that's the name on it) takes too long, anyone got any brilliant ideas for large-coverage primers?

 

--the fumes are getting to me.

 

--lstormhammer

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We're using a brush on model railroad paint for primer.  It's "POLLY Scale" by Testor.  We use an "undercoat lt. grey" as a base coat.

 

Of course we use some spray primer in black and white as well.

 

I like the brush on.  It covers well, cleans up easy, and dries quick.  When we spray primer, we miss spots, the brush on is great for the touch up.

 

No clue on styrofoam with this product, it hasn't come up yet.

 

Neat tip on stirrers for the paint jars: McDonald's coffee stirrers.  Cheap, disposable, long handles, with a paddle to take out paint for blending/mixing.  We grab them by the handful when we hit McDs.

 

cbs

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Thanks for the tip about the coffee stirrers (about the only reason to go to Mickey-D's).

 

--pondering how he's answering all these messages, and still getting his work done.

 

--lstormhammer

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a tip on the Styrofoam, Cover the whole thing in what we call "pva" glue, a white craft glue, that drys clear, and hard. you can add sand to texture it, and it will protect the 'foam.

The glue is REALLY cheap too.... water it down alot too.... 3-1 water to glue or something. you can then spray it with any spray you like.... and it will help protect the 'foam too.

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Another tip on styrofoam- Go to your local chain hobby place. NOT where you would get your mini-fix, I am talkin Michael's or Hobby Lobby, or whatever is in your locale...

 

 

Head over to the fake FLOWER section.  Yes, you heard me.  FLOWERS.  Look around in this section, and you will find Styrofoam safe spray paints. Really.  The daisy-sniffin, tree-huggers figgured out how to paint the fake flower stuff that is typically mounted in FOAM, without the foam dissolving into a goo.  

 

Point of note: the stuff does not cover well on much else, but it will do the same job as the pva trick, and dry a bit quicker.

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In the FLOWER section?

 

Wow. Finally something to check out in that area....

 

Thanks for the tip.

 

-sniffin' glue.

 

--lstormhammer

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and from white, I can paint any color.

 

 

--lstormhammer

That looks like a cue to start the traditional "black undercoat vs. white" argument.

It is now very rare for me to undercoat a miniature in white - I find black gives all colours a much deeper basecoat, allowing more subtlety in shading and highlighting. Anything that needs a brightness, such as yellow or some reds, can have a white basecoat painted over the black.

I used to use white undercoat on everything (btw I use Citadel sprays) but it is possible now to tell the difference on a finished miniature and I will always use black. If you have always undercoated white, try black next time and see if you can't see a difference.

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Black vs white?

 

In the past I've primed a lot of black. Now I don't like it any more. Here is what I do:

 

I prime white. Then I take my black paint, water it down a little (1:1), and put it in all the cracks and crevices, as well as shadows. This allows a few benefits. when painting the place where say the cloak meets the armor, I can leave a very thin line of black, which gives a subtle blacklining effect. Secondly it does an auto shade for the shadows. Third, it "hides" blaces I can't reach easily with a brush making them black as the shadows (whereas if you miss a white spot in the shadows, it glares really bad). And Last but not least, I don't have to "fight" a black primer when trying to put thin coats of layers (which is what I like to do), regardless of whether I'm using bright, dull, pastel, or dark colors.

 

Of course for metallics you should put down a coat of black, before painting regardless of whether you are highlighting, or drybrushing. A variation I've seen is for gold, some people put a dark red undercoat. I have yet to try this.

 

On a final note, getting the primer evenly and smoothly on the mini is extremely important. If it looks like you have bumps, rough areas, or globs, you really shouldn't think it'll be okay when you paint it. It won't. Strip the primer, and start over. Saves you a lot of headache in the long run.

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Actually, I've tried both the base black undercoat and the watered down shadowing with black paint, and both still look bad IMHO.

 

I'll spray white, and take out my Dork Glasses! (actually a magnifying visor) and my smallest brushes and go in there and paint the colors I need to in those crevises and the like.

 

If I'm painting something like a Pegasus (er, a Nightmare, they're cooler), then I'll start with a black base. But with the rare exception of 'painting a tank', it's white, then color from there.

 

--the fumes are getting to me.

 

--lstormhammer

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I concur.  I've tried the black coats, the white with thinned black shading and the white, I prefer the white.

 

Courtesy disclaimer here, your opinion matters, I agree to disagree.

 

I do like the black primer if I'm doing something like the scarab swarm, or when I did the Cerebrus.  And it did work wonders for the treasure hoards(I).

 

Now if I can get the digicam to focus, I could share some pics.

 

cbs

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I do white primer, sometimes with thinned black over it, sometimes not. I know that there are a lot of opinions on it & frankly the finished product depends on many things, including the brand of paint you're using, the number of times you're willing to go over the miniature with extra layers, etc. So depending on what paints are available in your local store & who taught you to paint, the best primer for you could be very different. I've also got good results with a light grey...

 

But, y'know, that's not even why i decided to chime in. I noticed someone talking about red under gold. I've used it & it does look better, but especially fabulous is olive drab as a base coat under copper! It leaves a realistic patina in the crevices & good copper color on the raised & flat surfaces. Do it! Do it now!

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I do white primer, sometimes with thinned black over it, sometimes not. I know that there are a lot of opinions on it & frankly the finished product depends on many things, including the brand of paint you're using, the number of times you're willing to go over the miniature with extra layers, etc. So depending on what paints are available in your local store & who taught you to paint, the best primer for you could be very different. I've also got good results with a light grey...

 

But, y'know, that's not even why i decided to chime in. I noticed someone talking about red under gold. I've used it & it does look better, but especially fabulous is olive drab as a base coat under copper! It leaves a realistic patina in the crevices & good copper color on the raised & flat surfaces. Do it! Do it now!

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Yes, Crip! I have done that.

 

a little O.D. for a base (especially thinned out a little) then drybrush copper over it. It makes great statues (or detail for Undead)

 

Listen to Crip, and do it now!

 

--And I've got the bat!

 

--lstormhammer

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I use an excellent, cheap brand that can be found at any Family Dollar store. It's labeled "Rust Curb" and says "Snap Gloss Finish", even on the flat paints. This is the best I've used so far as quality, consistency, and value. It costs $2 for a 19 oz. can and lasts a very long time!

 

Now, as for the "Black/White" ideal, I use both. For vehicles/robots/guys in armor/really dark dragons, I use black and shade outward, dark to light. For figures in normal clothes or natural critters, I use white and do the colors from there. I just finished a Amber Dragon for a client, and she had me do it in dark green w/ Reaper green steel over the main body scales. The wing membranes were done a dark, intense green, non metallic. The belly scales were doen charcoal grey with a deep, metallic grey drybrushed over them. The eyes are flourescent blue. As soon as I get my friend to take the pics, I'll be posting it here!

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I use mostly automotive primers now adays because of Citidel being over 8 bucks a can after tax in my area. I find it works well enough and I like the colors I can get it in. Thing is I try to keep the spray nozzels extra clean cause a bad primer job requires stripping.solvent and tiny needles really help sometimes.

 

 

White: I like white for minis, I will pick this or grey as default if I donít have any special plans for the mini.

 

Black: Used for heavily armored / metalic minis or figs I want really dark. Since i use cheaper craft paint this stuff is a real Bbiglaugh.gifbiglaugh.gifbiglaugh.gifbiglaugh.gif to paint some colors over.

 

Brown : perfecrt for hairy animals, skeletons or earthy minis. I †used this on one of my ìBlorg Mudstump Hill giantîs And Grim Reaper Castingsís Giant skeleton wth [bicardiís] BATtle axe.

 

Grey: I like the nuetral color of grey personally

 

Red: Limited applications but red can be a difficult color to get if you are painting over just about any color other than itself. I have a 2 foot long vynil dragon ìminiî and my can of red primer will save me A LOT of effort in the basecoat department.

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