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Mydnight

Paint it white!

4 posts in this topic

Hey everybody, I'm starting to lurk, and do a lot more painting, but I'm a far cry from improving on my methods.

 

Big question of the day, painting white. Recently I've found myself wanting to paint some pieces that are a nice sharp Dragon White, but have textured backgrounds, areas, etc.

 

I've tried a few things, and each time I come up unsuccessful, and I am seeking help!

 

Pretty much outside of just putting the paint on the minis (out of the bottle), I just have drybrushing, though I think I do it slightly different from what it is normally done (maybe).

 

If I could get my hands on a digi camera I could put up some pics of what I've gotten done.

 

Edit: Ok, I got my hands on a cam, tried taking some pics, that's a learning experience I've begun upon, but here's a Halbarad that I did, just to give you an idea of my skill level.

 

post-1799-1140164713_thumb.jpg

 

Please help :down:

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It might just be me - but I don't recall ever having the problems with whites and yellows that others seem to have...though it could be that I managed to choose the right approach first.

 

Normally I primer in grey - which generally seems to have the fewest problems overall. After that I start doing layer, after layer, after layer ad nauseum of thinned down white. My light colors (yellow, white, pastels) I normally thin down to about 2-1 paint and gunk stuff. My gunk stuff mix is 20-1-1-3...distilled water, alcohol, flow improver, glaze. Water thins the paint, alcohol breaks the surface tension (as does Dawn and Windex), flow improver...well it does what it says, and the glaze keeps it from being too runny.

 

Mix your gunk, mix the paint - spread the paint. Works everytime for me.

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I've got mixed results overall, but what works best so far is thinned paint, with flow improver (quite a bit of it actually, seems to help the paint self-level) and then lots of smooth translucent layers, over a dark undercoat. Mind you I like a bit of deep shade and a slightly dirty look, so BLACK undercoat may not be for you- that's what I used though.

 

And yeah, what Tommy said while I was typing away laboriously. So for his example, the white t-shirt, imagine a guy standing hands-at-sides. The deepest part of the crease between sleeve and trunk stays black (maybe some really thin white over it if that's too contrast-y a look). Then what I'd do is "undercoat" the upper chest, shoulders, a bit of the outer sleeve, and any high-up folded cloth that'd catch the sun in white. These bits we want pure white. Then grab your very thin, smooth blend of white paint, water and flow improver, and start doing "layers". The white undercoat on the highest highlights is just a shortcut, works for me.

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Rule 1, thin your paints. At the scales that we paint, a 'normal' layer of craft (acrylic) paint will look like stucco on a mini. Ya gotta thin the paints (even if it is just clean water - lots of other things people put in there to help). I depends on the brand of paints as to how much you thin them. Some paints are very thick and can be thinned 1:2 paint/thinner (Citidel, Reaper Pro, most craft paints) The Reaper Master Series are thinner to start with and I generally go 1:1 with them.

 

Someone told me when I was starting "I you can cover it in one coat of paint, your paints are too thick. It should take at least 2 coats to get enough color build up for coverage."

 

Not wanting to open the craft paint vs. mini paint can of worms. I will say that some of the craft paints have trouble if you go way thin on them for washes. The pigments and emulsions just are not suited for that. OK? Other side of that coin - craft paints are cheap - generally around $0.50 or less vs. $2 plus for mini paints and you get more. I use both craft & mini paints, but generally only use the craft paints on terrain or other large areas.

 

 

Next, what brushes are you using? Good sable brushes are a plus - but you HAVE to take care of them. Nylon brushes are pretty good for a while, but the bristles will curl on you. Don't push paint - that is a good way to get a brush that looks like an afro.

 

There are lots of good articles and tutorials around on the net.

This forum in the sticky section above

http://www.reapermini.com/TheCraft on Reaper's home page

http://www.coolminiornot.com/article Cool Mini or Not (CMON) articles.

http://www.jenova.dk/ Jenova who paints amazing.

 

and many (mini?) more.

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