Mydnight

Getting the horse before the cart

9 posts in this topic

Ok, I've painting on my own for over 8 years now, and I'd say I've done a fair job on my own with very little technique or instruction (didn't really learn from anyone all that much). In short, I've had drybrushing, no thinning, and some watered down inks, that's about it.

 

Example of my Halbarand found in this thread...

 

http://www.sing365.com/music/lyric.nsf/Sup...825704D0027C3B8

 

Now, I have found my passion reborn, and I'm excited to bring myself up to speed. Naturally I hit up the internet and try to find something new to add to my minis.

 

The result is astounding! But, there is a catch. I keep seeing refrences to all sorts of basic art maneuvers such as highlighting, thinning, layering, so on and so forth. Now I have seen some refrences to these techniques (even on Reaper's own page), and I'm usually left scratching my head. My biggest concern is how much and where to put it. I like seeing ratios, such as 1:2 thinner/color, but I have no idea where to put the mixture, I'm also left confused as to what I should use to mix, should I keep some on hand, etc etc. Essentially, I'd like some lamen's terms please. I've seen a lot of techniques, and I'm very eager to learn (I do learn quickly! Honest!), but it is hard for me to understand the advanced techniques without the basics :down:

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Dr. Faust's Painting Clinic has alot of different articles on painting techniques at different levels, and sometimes different views of how to do the same thing. There's probably something there for you.

 

I'd also recommend you take a look at the articles at Cool Mini Or Not.

 

Good luck!

 

/ali

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I found the guides at Ellsweb really helpful when I started out. He covers all the basics on prep, painting, bases, etc. and has lots of helpful pictures.

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You listed your location as Illinois. What part of Ilinois are you in?

 

In the Chicago suburbs, there is a regular Wed. night painting group at Games Plus in Mt Prospect. That is one way to learn (I'm sure there are other groups around IL as well)

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You listed your location as Illinois. What part of Ilinois are you in?

 

In the Chicago suburbs, there is a regular Wed. night painting group at Games Plus in Mt Prospect. That is one way to learn (I'm sure there are other groups around IL as well)

 

I used to live in P-Field, but now I live in Central IL, DOH! :wacko: Thanks though!

 

To everyone else, great stuff so far, keep it coming!

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I'm a beginner (again), so you'll want to take my suggestions with a grain of salt...

 

The thinner that I use is really a variation of Anne's "gunk": 60% distilled water, 20% flow improver, 20% extender, mixed up and put into an empty MSP dropper bottle. The flow improver is Reaper's MSP flow improver. The extender is from Hobby Lobby.

 

For actual painting, I just mix on my pallette as I need a color: 3 drops MSP and 1 drop gunk (normally) for base coats (I'm not up to layering yet).

 

I am going to try and mix up some "magic wash" (probably on the pallette first, but if I like it, I may mix and put it into another empty MSP dropper bottle.

 

Ron

PS: Your link seems really off: to song lyrics?!?

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This article from the Vallejo site is extensive.

AcrylicTech

 

These two books by Sheperd Paine have great info on highlighting/shading.

 

Building and Painting Scale Figures - OOP but available in libraries.

 

How To Build Dioramas.

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Yeah the Vallejo site has illustrations of basic terms.

 

Here's a few basics:

 

Highlight: where the light hits an object, the colour should be brighter and lighter. Imagine a black and white picture or a sketch. In fact a book on sketching for beginners would get you going on this and shading.

 

Shade: Where shadows fall, the colour should be darker. This and highlighting are done to make the miniature look more life-sized and les like it's 28mm tall.

 

Shading and highlighting can also make the colours look better, advanced painters can make a cloak look more like velvet, or leather, or faded cotton, by controlling the way it APPEARS to reflect light, for example, velvet would get very deep, dark shading and intense colour, while cotton would be paler, with slight shadows and light highlights.

 

Layering: see the vallejo article linked above. It's good to learn layering, it can be used for quick paintjobs by just having very few layers.

 

Wash: slapping on a thin layer of very watery paint and letting it run into the creases on the model, a quick way of shading. Use a drop of flow improver!!! Be prepared to tidy up afterwards by repainting some of the original colour.

 

Drybrushing: get a little thinned paint on the brush (ie, paint mixed with a bit of water, acrylics "thin" with water) and wipe the brush mostly dry. It still carries a bit of paint. Wipe it lightly and repeatedly across the miniature so it only touches the raised bits. A quick way of highlighting, very good for metallic paints.

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