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Evilbob

Highlighting to White

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normally, I wouldn't highlight to white. But for this piece I'd like to at least attempt it.

 

But how do you highlight dark brooding colors (Dark Elf Skin, Stormy Sea Triad, Military Blues) to white (or really close to white) and still make them look dark and brooding? All 3 of these color examples are on fabric, if that helps.

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well and thats the thing, I have no problem highlighting up to say one past the highlight in a triad (in this case, but over that and it looks cartoony. then I glazed it back down some to smooth it out, and now its pretty much back where I was.

 

The white just cortoony-izes this mini, and I really don't want that.

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The white just cortoony-izes this mini, and I really don't want that.

First off, yes - Great job so far!

 

 

I believe I understand, and I do not envy you. If you are highlighting to white, you are basically creating a "gloss" effect. This would mean that at the apex of the highlight, the highlight would be white. Am I right on this?

 

Since I cannot see what your mind wants to achieve, I can only speculate and there are two options.

 

#1. Bring the white out

Consider an ocean wave's peak in the moonlight. It is pure reflective of the light source, yet the little valleys of the current are dull. It would be dark sea green - sea green - white. This is the stark I was mentioning. Where the highlight is, there is no or little semblance of the traditional color.

 

The "white" looks like it exists in any reflection, and "white" is the highest indicator of reflection. However, this could be a trick of the mind. If it does exist, it would be very, very minute. Compare a car's polish to a mirror - the percieved "white" is only on the highest point and it is razor thin. A pure metal reflecting the sun can be seen as white, but tarnish the metal or smear mud on it, and the dullness makes the yellow the best that can be achieved - because the light from the sun is not pure white.

 

Based on this, if you want the "white", treat it like nmm, except a very sharp break to the white, and the white would be very thin indeed. What might help is finding similar colors that begin where the highest leaves off. Work up from there, smaller and smaller, until a gradual build to white is possible.

 

#2. Bring the other colors out

If a cloak is magical, or if it has more sequins than Elvis, then start with the white and very subtly, but deliberately color the cloak - sparingly - on the deepest parts. In this case, the reflective surface is easier to accept, as the white is predominant.

 

After a wash though, retouch the white so there is always the dominance.

 

 

I think either will work, but washes would kill any effect and push it down. White is very hard to begin with, as it is completely unique. Even harder is highlighting to white, and to do it without metal is Master's work or else it will look terribly "cartoonish".

 

 

The brightest color on these wet legs would be very, very light orange.

94872-shiny-legs-0.jpg

 

Copy that concept, and you're set.

 

White is pure. On clothing or people, highlighting to pure white is doubtfully found naturally on earth, so that itself could be a definition of a cartoon. What you would want would be to find reference material that has the "effect" of pure white, and the mind can translate your intentions even though technically pure white not there.

 

Look for photos of oiled leather saddles, soaped leather jackets, pleather, and/or the like.

 

HTH, I truly do! ::D:

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I have the same problem. What I've done is keep the pure white highlight extremely tiny, like the size of the mini's eyeball. And use the other objects that are shiny for leverage- so definitely hit the white on the pack's buckles.

 

Slop, I'd have to disagree with you on the above example. The very center of the tops of the shins is pure white- but that is also a function of cameras not being as sensitive as the our visual perception. Also, the highlights on the toenails are pure white. But the subject is in bright sunlight- if you wanted to paint this in a dark, brooding way, you could highlight just the toenails, and a tiny tiny bit on the shins.

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... Slop, I'd have to disagree with you on the above example...

Not a problem my friend. ::D: I'm married to a strong willed woman; I'm used to disagreement. :blush:

 

The very center of the tops of the shins is pure white- but that is also a function of cameras not being as sensitive as the our visual perception. Also, the highlights on the toenails are pure white....

I agree - they look pure white. I intentionally did not focus on that, mentioning the "very, very light orange" as opposed to shooting strait for the white. By trying to duplicate the example, he can very easily get the results equal to a "cartoon" feel. I tried to steer away from that since he could be discouraged if his results were the same as before he read the post.

 

Sometimes, the voices in my head cease to make sense once they hit my fingers. That, and how do I cram everything into a single post?! There are many holes in what I wrote, but I tried to focus on key elements ignoring diffusion, temperature, and even spotting - all of which are indicative of natural sunlight. I appreciate your ability to sum it all up in nice sentences and "lay it out there" as it were. ::):

 

I'm sorry if the point I eventually make is not the point that I intended to make. ::(:

 

Thanks in advance for your patience. ::):

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Someone once explained 'highlighting to white' to me as depending on the reflectivity of the surface you're painting, you would seldom put opaque white paint down. Only on shiny or chrome-like NMM would you try to get a superfine line of pure white on the zenith-edge of the highlight. Shiny metal has sharper, whiter spots closer to the darkest areas, the transitions being rather abrupt because the surface is so hard & reflective. Fuzzy, soft cloth diffuses highlights and you won't really see pure white highlights anywhere on it. Silks, tighter-weave cloth and dry skin are somewhere between, but wet or oily skin carries the sharper highs in spots, almost like metal.

 

A dark mini, without obvious light source(s), OSL, etc., in soft cloaks and well-travelled leather would have more diffused -- glazed, translucent white, rather than opaque -- highlights. It looks to me like you're really on the right track.

 

I'm terrible at describing it, and I hope I haven't confused you more. I'm far from mastering it, myself, obviously. Maybe this article at Wyrd might help.

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You know... I just now read the subtopic "and still looking dark and brooding". :wacko:

 

I really wish I were more perceptive. :unsure:

 

Is it too late to change my answer? I'd like to by a vowel! I'll bid $400, Bob. :blink:

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The key to this is the obvious one--keep your white highlight extremely small. In response to previous posters--if you go up abruptly from dark to light, you'll get a silk or satin (shiny) effect. If you go up gradually, but over a small area, you'll get a more standard cloth-like effect.

 

The key is: Keep at least 50% of the surface of the object the color you want it to appear to the eye. 25% shadow. 25% or less, highlights. If your "midtone" is a dark color, and you keep it 50% or more of the surface area, you can take highlights as light as you like and it will still look "dark".

 

--Anne

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Thanks all!!!

 

I havn't worked on him since I posted (had to go see Die Hard, and then had Soccer last night), but now I think I may be able to go from here and ot fling him across the room.

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... but now I think I may be able to go from here and ot fling him across the room.
Don't do it EvilBob!! That would make you evil... er... evil-er? ... Yes that would make you eviler!! You don't want to change your handle now, do you?! :blink:

 

I am so curious, I have to ask... Why white? What effect are you going for? The only dark and brooding I come up with when I think of "white" is Martha Stewart... so why white in the first place? :rock:

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