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sam500

I suck at washes

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Ok,

So the title says it all.

However, I'm not convinced it's just me and not most people.

How did this topic start you ask?

Well, I was minding my own business and came upon this article on NMM tarnished bronze on www. brushthralls.com

http://www.brushthralls.com/Mambo/index.ph...3&Itemid=43

 

I thought the end result was so groovy I'd give it a try.

Several hours later I had a mini which looked like something I might have painted 10 years ago (I'll have to post a picture later).

It looked no different than if I had painted the armour brown and dunked it in a blue wash.

 

The theory that repeated light washes with different colours adds something to the final mini leaves me wanting. I just don't see it. If I wash to thin then no colour is lasting. Too thick and the surface retains the colour of only the final wash.

 

Layering, Feathering, Wetblending I understand and know work well, but this washing has me baffled.

Is there something I'm missing?

 

Another technique that confuses me is drybrushing hair and chainmail especially. My chainmail always looks garbage whenever I do this. Do other people drybrush their chainmail or do they go over with a fine detail brush in stripes.

I always get a grainy appearance through drybrushing (possibly with not enough paint left on) or my highlight goes on to heavy and into the seems (with too much paint left on or watered down paints).

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The theory that repeated light washes with different colours adds something to the final mini leaves me wanting. I just don't see it. If I wash to thin then no colour is lasting. Too thick and the surface retains the colour of only the final wash.

 

Layering, Feathering, Wetblending I understand and know work well, but this washing has me baffled.

Is there something I'm missing?

In a real world example, try using photoshop (from an earlier post I assume you're proficient). Make a 20% opacity fill in yellow. On top of it, make a 20% opacity fill in blue. This will achieve around a 40% opaque green. That is the "concept" of what the wash can achieve. It is a method of subtleties, and overdoing the style will leave the work garish. The only part left is knowing how far to thin, or not thin, your paints.

 

Another technique that confuses me is drybrushing hair and chainmail especially. My chainmail always looks garbage whenever I do this. Do other people drybrush their chainmail or do they go over with a fine detail brush in stripes.

I always get a grainy appearance through drybrushing (possibly with not enough paint left on) or my highlight goes on to heavy and into the seems (with too much paint left on or watered down paints).

I'm not sure if this will help you, but I've seen many fight with this. This is a more "base" explanation without too much technical "who-ha". For those that might not know, drybrushing does not mean "dry brushing", but its more of a "partial coverage" brushing, but it is limited to the ability of the paint dispersement from a semi-wet brush. This is probably why they call it "drybrushing" rather than "partial coverage paint dispersement from a semi-wet brush. " ::D:

 

Too much of incorrect drybrushing, using a mostly dry brush, applied to dried paint, creates a "sponge" effect. This effect will sap even more juice from the new paint being applied. It will be chalky since (for all practical purposes) dry paint is being applied. It becomes a vicious cycle of adding paint, that becomes chaulky, to add paint, that becomes chalky, and so on. :huh:

 

What might help would be to use a brush with around half of the load intact (dip it in paint, wipe it lightly once). Lightly go over the area to be drybrushed once. Just once, then put down the brush and walk away. Return in a few seconds and look at the effect. If the effect is unnoticeable, use a tad more paint. If the paint is too much on the miniature, use less paint. Recognize what drybrushing is intended to achieve, and target that effect. ::D:

 

Most problems with drybrushing are from the concept of drybrushing. Having a half dry brush, with the paint drying on the brush, wiping dried or drying paint over the same area, is not the intention of "drybrushing".

 

Hope this helps someone, as I've seen the question raised before.

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It looked no different than if I had painted the armour brown and dunked it in a blue wash.

 

Sounds to me like you applied the tarnishing wash over too much surface area. You need to apply the tarnish selectively and moderately, targeting areas that you think would accumulate tarnish and leaving other areas free of it. You should also give some thought to varying the degree of highlighting on the tarnish (you did layer up highlights over the washed areas, yes?) Tarnish, rust, dirt, etc. -- these things aren't uniform. Some areas will just be shade, some will climb all the way north to icy blue highlights, others will remain in the murky green mid-tones.

 

Pictures would help to diagnose your problem.

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I think the key phrases in his article are :

 

"...you can start to learn how laying down each color with a little bit of care towards light and dark areas and even almost leaving out some color in a few spots can create a very dynamic color build..."

 

and

 

"...It is a color build that took a good two weeks to finalize to this degree..."

 

In other words, as Whiz says above, it needs lots of tweaking to make it look good, and several of the color layers are localized (applied only to certain parts) rather than laid down over everything in a traditional wash. ::): In fact, he mentions that he's feathering (layering) at one point in that article. The artist is good enough to give you his color selection, but to make it look like his you will need to play with it like he did! :lol:

 

Very spiff article, though, definately bucks the color curve and gives me some ideas about a green bronze I've been thinking about. ::):

 

Re: drybrushing, yeah, it's very hard to hit that perfect place where you get the effect you want without graininess. I dislike the technique precisely because it does leave a texture (if it doesn't, then you've got enough paint on your brush to be layering, and may as well remove your headache by doing just that!). I once knew a guy who had the drybrush-fu and could lay down multiple layers of it with a very, very fine texture that looked perfect on stuff like lizardman pterodon wings, but he's the only one I've ever met who just "clicked" with that technique.

 

Me, I didn't learn to drybrush until after I knew how to layer. :;):

 

--Anne

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Me, I didn't learn to drybrush until after I knew how to layer. :;):

 

--Anne

 

wow :rotflmao: wow, that is so me. I got frustrated with drybrushing because I it looked so bad, so I tried the "advanced techniques". Later I had a ton of figs for Warlord to paint, so I tried drybrushing again. Guess what I found out? My drybrushing sucked because my brush control sucked. When I tried it again, after years of practicing other techniques, I could finally do it!

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