Jump to content

sam500

Cool Idea for the Computer Minded

Recommended Posts

I saw this book called "The Color Index". It was basically hundreds of examples of colours that go well together (hundreds of colour schemes). The colors where identified by their number or letter according to computer colour indexing (1-F in six digits I believe). Also different pallettes where made depending on whether you were painting bright objects, natural objects, etc, etc.

 

Anyway, the book gave me an idea. How cool would it be if we identified the RMS line in that computer code (1-F in six digits I believe). Then we could go into photoshop and make swatches of what it will look like blending one colour in with another, or come up with cool color schemes online.

 

Right, who wants to do it!?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Sam,

 

Side stepping the obvious "schemes don't translate" or "same but different" arguments, I think that a color schemer "idea" might be fun.

 

On the upside, I think it would definitely help some mix and match. ::): I think it would be relatively simple to construct and maintain since there are finite colors in any line.::):

 

On the downside, I think there are a plethora of color wheels already on the web, and it might be redundant. ::(: I think also that anyone would use it would all have miniatures that looked identical.::(:

 

Expanding on that idea, in my opinion what would really be effective would be to incorporate a color schemer with a little common sense and allow people to:

1. Pick the colors.

2. Pick the miniature.

3. Print out a "paint by numbers" outline, that also lists what paints would be needed.

 

This would take the guessing out of the mechanics, and it would remove the intimidation or questions for the beginners.

 

------

 

Idea © 2007 slop_artist :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a similar book called The Complete Color Harmony except that it lists colors as CMYK values.

 

The 6 digit hexadecimal code are the 3 RGB values used to represent the color on computer monitors or TVs. The book that I have is based on the Cyan-Magenta-Yellow-Black system used for printed color values.

 

There are a few difficulties with the idea.

 

The first is that colors often look different on different screens and depending on what is around any given color. So, one color will look slightly different on my LCD monitors at work compared to my laptop at home under different lighting conditions and compared to someone else's CRT.

 

The colors that surround another also affect perception. Here is a site with some neat color illusions.

 

A second difficulty is matching a color in the real world to a color on the screen is really hard and will generally only be "accurate" for you looking at your screen (given differences in color perception and the above color accuracy issue).

 

Finally, you're not likely to get any official support from Anne since having the codes would be a step towards someone being able to reproduce the Reaper MSP colors.

 

All of that said, here is a link to an online color scheme generator and color wheel that does have RGB values as well: Color Scheme Generator 2

 

And another one: Color Schemer.

 

 

Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if anyone else is, but I have been doing that same thing for a half dozen or so years now.

 

Get the mini, and prime it. Take a high contrast black and white photo, and bring it into Photoshop.

 

Try out different color schemes to figure out what works and what I like.

 

Paint mini.

 

Definately saves time over getting half done and figuring out that the colors aren't quite working.

 

As far as the color chart goes - there was one here awhile back. http://www.thewolfhound.com/ww2/?c=main&mc=paint It seems to have gone missing, but for the time being I can post it back up on a remote site with approval from ReaperMatt or someone who can speak for him. My spider keeps everything I look at untill I run out of disc space and that happens to still be in there.

 

Finally, you're not likely to get any official support from Anne since having the codes would be a step towards someone being able to reproduce the Reaper MSP colors.

 

I think she was the one who provided the RGB values for ReaperMatt's site.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Color Index book has the CMYK and RGB color formulas, yes?

 

The downside is what might look good on your monitor might not translate well to paint depending on a bunch of factors. I do work in an art conservation lab as well as a photography lab and they are very particular about color balance, configuring the monitors (there is some special hardware to color adjust) - as well as lighting used in the labs and a group of other factors.

 

But as a rough guide, I'm all for it. Most of the people here are really helpful in selecting color choices though. With a $1 color wheel, you can come up with a decent color scheme and people here can say, Oh yeah this triad mixes well with that triad - or avoid this traid because you are mixing cool and warm colors, and it looks funny.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't know if anyone else is, but I have been doing that same thing for a half dozen or so years now.

 

Get the mini, and prime it. Take a high contrast black and white photo, and bring it into Photoshop.

 

Try out different color schemes to figure out what works and what I like.

 

Paint mini.

 

Definately saves time over getting half done and figuring out that the colors aren't quite working.

 

As far as the color chart goes - there was one here awhile back. http://www.thewolfhound.com/ww2/?c=main&mc=paint It seems to have gone missing, but for the time being I can post it back up on a remote site with approval from ReaperMatt or someone who can speak for him. My spider keeps everything I look at untill I run out of disc space and that happens to still be in there.

 

Finally, you're not likely to get any official support from Anne since having the codes would be a step towards someone being able to reproduce the Reaper MSP colors.

 

I think she was the one who provided the RGB values for ReaperMatt's site.

 

 

That would be awesome Joe!

Please post the link once you get permission.

Cheers,

Sam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just took the cheesy low-tech approach and downloaded the most recent RMS ad with the colour images of the triad samples. Then I use the medicine dropper in Photoshop to pick up the paint from that image file and brush it onto whatever B&W mini I want to "paint" on.

 

On a slightly related but totally unrelated note, I scanned the "Art of Talin" colouring book they gave out at ReaperCon this past year. Using actual RMS triads to compu-colour the picture gets some darn good results.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you ever checked out Adobe's Kuler? I use it a lot at work to work up color schemes, and there's lots of user made ones that are good. It's a really slick tool, but sadly, no RMS equivalents are listed.

 

Check it out here:

 

Adobe Kuler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another option...as opposed to trying to translate color and such...and I use this sometimes:

 

Take a picture of the mini/convert to line---print it out on some good paper....paint it. I've done this a couple of times when testing paint recipes. You can also use this same approach, if you can't get the paper to hold paint well----all you do is get some transfer paper---and transfer the drawing to some primed plasticard, or a higher quality water color or acrylic paper.

 

This way you're not worried about the color inconsistencies---

 

Kev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Have you ever checked out Adobe's Kuler? I use it a lot at work to work up color schemes, and there's lots of user made ones that are good. It's a really slick tool, but sadly, no RMS equivalents are listed.

 

Oooh, quite nifty. I've got a couple of desktop ones, but Kuler seems to do quite a bit of what they do. Thanks!

 

Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As far as the color chart goes - there was one here awhile back. http://www.thewolfhound.com/ww2/?c=main&mc=paint It seems to have gone missing, but for the time being I can post it back up on a remote site with approval from ReaperMatt or someone who can speak for him. My spider keeps everything I look at untill I run out of disc space and that happens to still be in there.

 

He's now known as Akela on the board & I bet he'll say yes. IIRC, the chart was lost by accident & if you've got it still... I'd love at least a PM of it. It'd prevent alot of re-creation... yessss...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll ask his wife, Jay, to ask him about it. If he gives permission it would be great if you could host it and post the link in the Color Equivalency thread. ::):

 

--Anne ::D:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Untill I get a chance to simplify (and lighten it's load) here is a compilation list that I have been using for quite some time. I updated the RMS and RPP lists from Anne's list and snagged a few others as well. Once I finish scanning my swatches for the other paint lines I'll get those available as well.

 

Note, the RPP color samples are not mine. I had to use the swatches from the Reaper catalog since I don't own any RPP paints. The VMC, FS and RMS are actual scanned data. As such the colors are accurate in relation to one another. In some instances, two different lists may not have meshed up (RMS 9069 for example). Where that happens, I left both untill I have a chance to actually adjust the list (or if a consensus can be reached). In other instances, I simply combined the lists (for example, if Vallejo Model Color 894 says it is the same as FS# 34083 and Anne says Jungle Moss is the same as 894...then Jungle Moss should also be the same as #34083...).

 

Once I get everything scanned in (I had been meaning to do that anyway...), I will get an interface put together which will allow you to select only certain lines or to compare different paints swatches side by side.

 

As far as what I will be scanning, most of the Testor's Model Master paints, Vallejo Game Color, P3, Rackham Paints, GW paints and Tamiya Paints.

 

Any comments, suggestions, corrections, clarifications...let me know.

 

Forgot the link...

http://www.silicon-dragons.com/reaper/MasterList.html

 

Give it a minute, the thing is big and ugly right now...somewhere around the 2 MB range.

 

Oh yeah - there is a chance that while scanning, cropping, and naming...I may have mislabeled one or two of the swatches. Rest assured that it will be corrected as soon as I can see something other than all the pretty dots :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just so I'm using the kuler site right, you take colors & see if they look good together?

 

site looks interesting, but kinda lost on how to use it at the moment (then again---got off work about an hour ago, so starting to get tired. ha ha)

 

thanks

 

RM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I saw this book called "The Color Index". It was basically hundreds of examples of colours that go well together (hundreds of colour schemes). The colors where identified by their number or letter according to computer colour indexing (1-F in six digits I believe). Also different pallettes where made depending on whether you were painting bright objects, natural objects, etc, etc.

 

I do like the book that you've mentioned here, it's probably my favourite of the colour scheme recipe books that I've seen. One of the things I like about it is that there are strips of the colours used in the schemes down the side of the page. I'm working on painting swatches of all the paints I own, and that makes it easier to match paints to the colours in the book. It's also helpful for holding up next to a mini to check how nicely a colour goes with what's already painted on to the fig. As screen representations of paint colours can be so very different from how they appear in person, I feel more comfortable with the physical swatches than doing everything on screen.

 

Vutpakdi makes an excellent point about the fact that colours aren't absolutes and how dramatically our perception of them is affected by what's around them and in what quantity, that site he linked to is very cool and mindboggling. I keep an index card for each figure I paint tracking the colours I used for future reference. If I'm shaky on the colour scheme, I'll start by doing three or four sketches of the figure and then paint in colours. My sketches are blobby and not at all artsy (as opposed to those by Derek Schubert, who suggested the idea to me), but as the point is simply to see how a colour scheme works when you've got this colour on the big cloak and that one for the tiny pouches and so on, it works pretty well. If I've got some of the colour scheme painted but I'm just trying to decide do I want a warm gold or a cool or what's a third colour I could use, I take a picture of what I've got and play around in Photoshop as others have mentioned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×