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JackMann

Citadel Paint Set (Dark Angels Space Marines)

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This is my first attempt at painting miniatures. Worker at the FLGS (Hat's in Tucson) talked me into trying this paint set as something fairly simple, with lots of flat surface and not too many fiddly details or textures. I've definitely got a long way to go still, but I liked the way they came out, overall.

 

I ended up painting three of the five. I was painting in the hobby shop, and, having just gotten back to the states, I didn't want to be too late getting home. The other two are in the background. I'll eventually get to them, hopefully after my skills have improved, and I can compare them with the first three.

 

Marinestop.jpg

 

Here's a top view, giving a look at the box they came in, along with the two in the back.

 

MarinesFront.jpg

 

Here's a front view. The bit of muck on the Marine on the left's forehead is apparently supposed to be wreath-like, signifying he's in charge. Obviously, I did not do well on that detail.

 

MarinesBack.jpg

 

About face! I like the way the skulls came out.

 

 

MarinesLeft.jpg

 

Face right! The sword-sigil things on their pauldrons had... mixed results. I need to work on thinning out the paint, and not picking up so much water on the brush.

 

MarinesRight.jpg

 

Face left! Those are supposed to be arrows. Yeah, I wouldn't have guessed from the paintwork either.

 

Overall, better than I expected them to turn out, though I need to work a lot harder on the details.

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Um. You missed some of the armor plates on their thighs and arms. . . .

 

Actually the skulls came out really well, which bodes well for your brush control, one of the first things to work on. The other is getting an even coat of paint over an entire area and keeping your edges neat. Don't be afraid of thinning your paint if it's not going on as evenly as you'd like, just as long as you don't thin it so much it pools - Two thin coats are better than one thick one, and as long as you get good coverage in the end it doesn't matter how you got it. Remember, you can always add more paint, taking it off. . . Means taking everything off.

 

On details like the insignia you might want to try moving the brush perpendicular to the surface, so that you're running it's edge over any raised areas. Concentrate on establishing the edges first, and then go back and fill in the main part of the design.

 

Try painting 'skin out'. It might seem strange to paint details like the eyes and recessed machinery first, but it means that if you do go over the edges, you can always neaten them up when you paint the main armor plates.

 

Just concentrate on getting neat, even painting on your first few miniatures, and don't be afraid of block colours. Remember, you can always go back and add shading, highlights and details when you're confident you've grasped the basics (. . . something I wish someone had told me, I tried to do everything on my first few miniatures, and the results were. . . . Predictable)

 

Hope some of this helps.

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A good start! Maybe get a better brush, too, a good point makes a lot of difference.

 

Yeah, looking at reviews of the paint set online, one of the primary criticisms is of the brush, which makes me feel slightly better at the sloppy detail work. When I next stop by a game store, I'll pick up a better one.

 

Um. You missed some of the armor plates on their thighs and arms. . . .

 

That was deliberate, actually. I wanted to try getting different mixes of black and green armor, just to see how it looked.

 

Actually the skulls came out really well, which bodes well for your brush control, one of the first things to work on. The other is getting an even coat of paint over an entire area and keeping your edges neat. Don't be afraid of thinning your paint if it's not going on as evenly as you'd like, just as long as you don't thin it so much it pools - Two thin coats are better than one thick one, and as long as you get good coverage in the end it doesn't matter how you got it. Remember, you can always add more paint, taking it off. . . Means taking everything off.

 

Yeah, there was no thinning whatsoever here. All paint came directly from the bottles. The painting instructions in the kit didn't have any information on how to do things like thin the paint. That's probably going to be my next experiment. Probably once I get an apartment.

 

On details like the insignia you might want to try moving the brush perpendicular to the surface, so that you're running it's edge over any raised areas. Concentrate on establishing the edges first, and then go back and fill in the main part of the design.

 

Try painting 'skin out'. It might seem strange to paint details like the eyes and recessed machinery first, but it means that if you do go over the edges, you can always neaten them up when you paint the main armor plates.

 

Just concentrate on getting neat, even painting on your first few miniatures, and don't be afraid of block colours. Remember, you can always go back and add shading, highlights and details when you're confident you've grasped the basics (something I wish someone had told me, I tried to do everything on my first few miniatures, and the results were. . . . Predictable)

 

Hope some of this helps.

 

Thanks. That does help.

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A good start with the tools that you have. If you are willing to spring a bit for good brushes, dickblick.com has good prices. A good #1 and a good #00 (or so) will last you years with good care. I like Da Vinci Maestro series 10 or Raphael 8404 or 8408. Shipping will hurt a bit, but those brushes I'll be much better than what you can get at a game store for your main brush.

 

Keep the starter brush for mixing, dry brushing, and poking into recesses.

 

Some Pink Brush Soap from Michaels or Hobby Lobby should also be on your shopping list.

 

Most importantly, just have fun and enjoy the experience. ::):

 

Ron

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Tucson? I am in Phoenix and just picked up the red starter box of elves for my first minis to paint. I have only painted one out of that box so far, but definitely plan on giving the others a go at some point to show my personal growth.

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Right now, I'm working with the Reaper Learn To Paint set, with a man-at-arms and a barrow rat. It's actually somewhat more difficult, but the instructions at least are better. The ones from Citadel basically just had "paint goes here." This actually explains drybrushing and washes.

 

Now, my experiments with washes? Not going so well so far. But I will persevere! And will post when I've finished the minis.

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* memories *

 

I had to do the first paint kit 3 times before I got it satisfactory. But once I did, I had a eureka moment. +500 xp, Painter Level 2 achieved! + 5 brush control, +5 paint thinning, +10 drybrushing.

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Washes will behave a bit better if you substitute about half the water with matte medium. Matte medium is kind like the part of the paint which isn't pigment, and it will help the washes stick in recesses. You can pick up more than you'll need at Michael's or Hobby Lobby for a few bucks.

 

Ron

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I have a simple tip from helping a mate paint some dark angels. I wish I could show rather than tell, but anyway:

 

Get some Reaper Brown Liner and a fine tip brush and try to darkline the deep shadows on the armour, like a tiny, controlled wash. It softens the transition to any black still showing and the brown-ness adds some warmth. This is very quick and simple, but it does require some brush control and a fine point. I liked the result, but of course you may not.

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