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#1 Azimuth

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 09:46 PM

I am part of a group of people at my work who have been obsessing over the kickstarter for the last few weeks. ^_^
Now that it's over, we, of course, really want to paint minis... I currently don't have any of my own, so thought I'd try my hand at sculpting.

I've done a mini before, but it didn't turn out too well (I've since been told I should try supersculpey and hae decided to start larger).

So, I went for a Huge size mini and a fairly simple design for #2. Chose a bulette and used an armature this time. I'm pretty happy with him, but looking for tips/feedback to improve.

Also looking for tips on painting sculpey. As far as I can tell, acrylic should work, but not sure about glazing/priming/etc....

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#2 rright0102

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 10:32 PM

Ever try resin casting? You can get a kit for about $50. It will allow you to make a rubber mold of your sculpt and then create a couple of casts. The resin casts will be non porous and easy to paint and you can make a herd of these guys.

#3 Adrift

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 10:55 PM

Well done! I might like to see his underside be a little more wrinkled laterally but overall I'm super-impressed. Consider using a little green stuff (or other) to fill in the mould line extending past his jaw toward the back of his head.

#4 Ironhammer

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 11:15 PM

Looks great! That is a fabulous start!

The best advice I can give you is not to be afraid to keep going. Don't be afraid/ashamed to start out with simple things, and don't be afraid to experiment. I always have to fight the feeling that whatever I do is going to turn out crappy so why try, but really everything you do adds to your knowledge and skill whether you're a beginner or a master.

I haven't painted sculpy all that much, but I'm pretty sure standard acryllics will do fine.
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#5 MonkeySloth

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 12:56 AM

Nice. I took a greenstuff sculpting class and, while I realize GS behaves differently, the big thing that was emphasized was build up layers. So start with the rough skeleton\muscles, let it dry then add skin over the top and refine the shape. Maybe that will work with Sculpty.

Also, I'm sure if you prime it well you'll be able to paint it normally.

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#6 Goblyn

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 07:51 AM

Ever try resin casting? You can get a kit for about $50. It will allow you to make a rubber mold of your sculpt and then create a couple of casts. The resin casts will be non porous and easy to paint and you can make a herd of these guys.


tell me more :huh:

#7 Lastman

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 08:13 AM

tell me more :huh:


Youtube has a lot of How To videos about resin casting. The Smooth-on company site does too. It's a bit pricey but not too difficult. You just need to be well organized because you need to work quickly or the stuff will harden before you pour it.

#8 rright0102

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 12:37 PM

tell me more :huh:


Check out http://www.alumilite.com/ they have kits used for different hobbies. From jewelry making to model railroading. They have videos on their site. Not sure this would be appropriate for 25mm minis with lots of detail, but for larger simple creatures like the bullete or maybe dungeon walls it would be perfect.

You could also cast in plaster (not the stuff you used in art class) once you have a rubber mold. If you get your hands on the dental quality stuff, it should be fairly sturdy.

#9 MonkeySloth

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 03:04 PM

Alumilite is what I use and you can get a great kit from Hobby Lobby for around $50 after using their 40% off weekly coupon.

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#10 Azimuth

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 04:35 PM

Oooh, resin casting sounds interesting... I will probably wait to do too much on that front until I am more comfortable with sculpting though.
Thanks for the tips so far! I definitely see some things I can improve.

Building up instead of scraping off is a good point (and probably why he doesn't have as many wrinkles as he should on his body). I think the bits I built up instead of scraped off are the ones that look better.

Using green stuff to supplement the sculpey is also a good idea. I didn't want to work fully in green stuff while I'm figuring out the basics because I'm afraid I won't work fast enough and it will dry out on me... but adding on with green stuff would be really useful. I learned with sculpture #3 (pics forthcoming soon) that they really mean it when they say not to overbake sculpey. :blink: I put a cape on after baking the main figure, and rebaked it... it cracked in a couple places. :wacko: Green stuff would probably help a lot with simple stuff like capes. I could do that fast enough.

Does anyone have experience bonding green stuff to sculpey? Will it stick ok on its own or does it require some help?

#11 Azimuth

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 12:04 AM

Okay, I used some green stuff to fill in the bullette's jawline and his sides a little bit (thanks for the ideas!) but I feel like I'm doing something wrong with the green stuff. It's REALLY sticky, and I can't get it very pliable. Having a really hard time shaping it, and when I tried to cut it/shape it with my tools it just stuck all over them. I can't get it all off. Am I doing something wrong? Did I just get some green stuff that's old or something?

#12 dks

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 08:42 PM

Green Stuff takes practice. Here are some basic hints from my 9 years of sculpting:

- KEEP YOUR SCULPTING TOOLS CLEAN: After the green stuff stuck to your tools has hardened, scrape it off with a knife. Green stuff sticks well to itself, so the problem will just get worse. Also, any putty left on your tools will mess up the clean and smooth shapes that you try to achieve with future sculpting.

- PREVENT THE PUTTY STICKING TO TOOLS: To keep the green stuff from sticking to your tools the next time you're working, use a lubricant. I use plain water in a little piece of blisterpack foam, but other sculptors use saliva (licking the sculpting tools -- though others consider it unhygienic to put putty in one's mouth or just dangerous to put a sharp object on one's tongue), petroleum jelly (a tiny amount spread on the back of your thumb should be enough of a "reservoir" for one session of sculpting), or even the oil from your skin ("nose grease"). Note that some techniques, though, require that you let the putty stick momentarily to the tool -- as you pull the tool away, it makes a little "plink" sound -- but it shouldn't leave any pieces behind on the tool. It takes a subtle touch.

- ITS CHARACTERISTICS CHANGE AS IT CURES: For the first 15 minutes or so after you mix the blue & yellow parts to make green, it is very sticky and pliable, like bubble gum or taffy. This is when you take the approximate volume that you expect to need, and stick it to your sculpture. Then push and pull it into the basic shapes. Then make the details. you'll probably find that you didn't put the right amount on at first (too little or too much). Sometimes you'll need the putty to be new and pliable when you're trying to make sharp or detailed shapes, but usually you'll need to wait an hour or so into the curing time or else the details just won't stay where you want them to go. After about 2 hours, the putty will be too stiff and rubbery for you to make any more changes, but you can make subtle changes (such as in facial expressions). Be careful not to accidentally squash the putty and ruin your work when you thought it was cured. It won't be fully cured for about a day -- or less if you heat it to speed the curing (see below).

- HEAT MAKES IT CURE FASTER, COLD MAKES IT CURE SLOWER: You can use the heat of a lamp to speed the curing. You can also put mixed putty into the freezer for a few minutes or an hour if you're interrupted while sculpting. Store unmixed putty in the freezer, too, because it does go bad eventually (becomes too stiff, gets little hard chunks in it, etc.).

- YOU CAN VARYING THE PROPORTIONS OF YELLOW AND BLUE: Feel the different characteristics of each component: yellow tears off in finer wispy pieces, but blue is gummier and more cohesive. The standard mix is equal parts blue & yellow. If you use more yellow (up to 2 yellow to 1 blue), the yellow-green putty will be stickier and looser and can hold finer/sharper details. If you use more blue (up to 2 blue to 1 yellow), the blue-green putty will be stiffer and will tend to pull any sharp edges into itself and round them off; this can be fine for massing and some musculature, but not for most finished detail work.

Good luck!

Derek
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