entropiccanuck

Paint sets / Vampire Level

37 posts in this topic

Hi,

I'm new to minis and painting, and excited by this opportunity. But, I'm wondering, how many paint sets like from the kickstarter would it take to paint 1 Vampire level worth of minis? The only paints I've bought previously were based on gallons and square feet of wall, so I don't have much to go on for mini scale. I expect the answer is pretty variable, but I figure someone would be able to tell me if the answer is closer to 2-3 than 5-6, or vice versa. Thanks.

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For most of the paints in the sets, just one will do ya. It will be a personal preference that will decide what, if any, are gone before the minis are painted. Normally, I use a drop or two of a color when painting up to three minis in a set. YMMV

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I have painted more than 75 miniatures with my initial paint investment. The only colors I've needed to replace are white, black, and two shades of brown.

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Paints last so long, most of mine are from a *used* lot from eBay. Guy had them for ~4 years of his hobby painting, I bought them and I've had them for ~3 years of my painting. I'd guess 90% of your paint ends up drying on the palette or a wipe cloth. If you get a wet palette the paint will stay usable for several days. I find it also helps to be working on more than one model at a time if they're going to share similar colors.

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If you get a wet palette the paint will stay usable for several days.

 

I had not heard of these, but after reading your post I looked them up on youtube. I will definitely be making one tomorrow. Thanks for the info.

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Glad to hear it! I used a DIY wet palette with parchment paper for a few months, but I've been using actual wet palette paper from Michaels since then and I'm a big fan. I don't know what kind of paper it is, but you start by boiling it for several minutes which causes it to swell up to maybe 1/32" while still being about as stiff as cardstock. Then you put it on your sponge and it can stay wet for months without degrading. You can also mix paint on it with silicone tipped tools like color shapers without worrying about punching through it. You can even rinse them off and reuse them. I'm only on the second sheet from the 30 pack I got for ~$10, and that was because it had taken on a tint and I wanted a fresh white one for new project ... that pack will probably last my lifetime.

 

The only thing they're not great for is super thin paint, washes, or inks. Without a depression to contain them, those just run all over the palette. So I still keep a little cheap plastic around for that. Happy painting!

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I would think that with a wet pallette, working on two or three models at a time that share colors, that a single paint set would do it. You *might* need a replacement black, flesh or other heavily used color. With two paint sets you could easily paint 200 human sized figures with paint to spare. If you're planning on doing a lot of dragons, giants and other large figures you'll find yourself using more paint, obviously.

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Glad to hear it! I used a DIY wet palette with parchment paper for a few months, but I've been using actual wet palette paper from Michaels since then and I'm a big fan. I don't know what kind of paper it is, but you start by boiling it for several minutes which causes it to swell up to maybe 1/32" while still being about as stiff as cardstock. Then you put it on your sponge and it can stay wet for months without degrading. You can also mix paint on it with silicone tipped tools like color shapers without worrying about punching through it. You can even rinse them off and reuse them. I'm only on the second sheet from the 30 pack I got for ~$10, and that was because it had taken on a tint and I wanted a fresh white one for new project ... that pack will probably last my lifetime.

 

The only thing they're not great for is super thin paint, washes, or inks. Without a depression to contain them, those just run all over the palette. So I still keep a little cheap plastic around for that. Happy painting!

 

I found the paper you are talking about at Michael's. Its Masterson Sta-Wet Premier Palette Acylic Paper, and comes in 30 sheet packs of 12"x16". List was 13.99, which means it can be had for less than $9 if you bother to print their 40% off one item coupon ::): I pick up a couple sponges at the grocery and have plent of old rubbermade containers, so I'll be trying out making a wet palette tomorrow.

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Unless you have a favourite colour that will be used predominantly on all your miniatures, I can't see you using up any of them up painting the 240 or so miniatures from Vampire Level. 1/2 oz. of paint lasts a really long time.

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On top of this, miniatures paint sites advocate "magic wash" to thin out paints. The Bones mini's are made of plastic that don't need priming. However, if you do this, you might not be able to add magic wash to your first basecoat. I also think n00bs can get pretty far with cheap craft paint. I painted up a 20+ miniatures space ork army with craft paints and like the results.

 

http://www.reapermini.com/Thecraft/15

 

http://www.paintingclinic.com/clinic/guestarticles/magicwash.htm

 

Also, go get some Army Painter Strong Ink Wash (the eyedropper ink, not the can varnish). Do some searching for tutorials on how to apply ink to basecoats.

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If you didn't have any paints which of the paint sets would you get? I was thinking I would get 1, 2, and 3. Now I'm thinking of just 1 and 3. Hmm

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Sets 1 and 3 are considered the very-useful-for-beginners sets. Sets 2 and 4 are for more advanced painters.

 

I'm thinking about getting sets 1 and 3 simply because all I've got are artists' acrylics, which have a much thicker texture and I suspect are more difficult to handle for specifically miniatures painting. Those two to my eye look like excellent basic sets.

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I recommend sets 1 & 3 as a good basic set of paints. If you wanted to get some more paints, you'd be better off picking up some individual paints.

 

Sets 2 and 4 are good sets for those who already have some paints or want those specific colors (and not only advanced painters).

 

As far as "magic wash" goes, most recommendations that I've seen for "magic wash" recommend it as a quick lining and shading step and not as a thinner or additive for paint. So, you could put on a coat of "magic wash" over the primer coat to quickly line a white primed mini or over a basecoat to quickly shade and line.

 

I put a coat of matte medium based magic wash over an unprimed Bones mini. As expected, the result was a failure, and I quickly washed it off. ::):

 

Ron

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Thanks to this thread, I am now getting a Kickstarter paint set #2. I had overlooked they were new colors and were from what I can tell roughly half off.

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I believe set #4 is also all new colours. And almost half off. :->

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