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Beer Goggles and other forms of second sets of eyes..


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#1 DSModels

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 09:39 PM

Hey guys, just wanted to through this question out there. I'm not as young as I used to be and I can't see things as close as before, so what I want to know is what do you use to see up close for all the details? Jewelers goggle, reading glasses, etc. etc. I'm hoping some of the Reaper Paint Team might have time to stop in and give their suggestions as well, like maybe :poke: Derek Schubert, Michael Proctor, or Jennifer Haley, etc. ::D: . I would love to know theirs and every ones secret to such high detail.

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#2 Adrift

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 09:47 PM

I'm not an official painter, but I paint a lot and I have a circular lamp that also have a massive magnifier lens imbedded. I like it when I'm trying to make sure that I've filled in all the recesses of something like chainmail.

#3 MonkeySloth

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 10:03 PM

I personally use this visor and heard at Gencon several pro painters that user something similar or the type that hang below the eyes\head (as it helps with posture). A lot of people like to say they don't need them because they're not old--I'm in my early 30's and I use one because it make some things easier and don't care what others say.

Note that this won't make up for poor brush control but can definitely help learn it.

I'd also be wary of any type of light\magnifier combo that wasn't LED (especially the jeweler's lamps) as the heat from the bulb will cause the paint to dry quicker on both your brush and miniature as, lets be honest, we all place the magnifying lens very close up to the miniature.
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#4 DSModels

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 10:50 PM

@MonkeySloth, Thanks for the link. That's about on spot as to what I figured would help with such detail.

Side note: I just ordered Jen Haleys CD. Hoping it might have some of those answers on it as well.
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#5 buglips*the*goblin

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 11:35 PM

I'm not an official painter, but I paint a lot and I have a circular lamp that also have a massive magnifier lens imbedded. I like it when I'm trying to make sure that I've filled in all the recesses of something like chainmail.


I have the same kind of thing - but right after I got it I made a discovery. One of those really obvious discoveries you never think of. I was squinting around one of my older parthas (back when 25mm was 25mm) and couldn't see the detail I wanted even with the magnifier.

I wear glasses to correct for near-sightedness. As I moved my head clipped the lamp overhang and they fell off - whereupon I learned that at my comfortable painting distance my natural vision is absolutely perfect for miniature painting. So my next mini I'm going to try it that way. Hopefully I won't poke my eye out with the brush.
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#6 Serenity

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 12:10 AM

If it is just your near vision going due to age, reading glasses will definitely help you out. You can try out different strengths at the store to see which one suits you best. You can bring a mini with you for the test if you want. Reading glasses can be very cost effective and you might prefer it to a visor. They have them at some dollar stores for $1 if you want to go really cheap, but you do tend to get what you pay for.

If you already wear glasses (like me), it is possible to double up the readers, though I've found that not as comfortable as wearing a visor. I've used both the Optivisor and a generic one from Harbor Freight. Both do the job, though the Optivisor is made of better materials and should be less likely to scratch.

You can get readers in a clip-on which go over your glasses, but I haven't tried those out. Another lens I found out about recently is a stick-on bifocal that you can add to most glasses (sunglasses or prescription). They're having a supply problem with those right now, but I may try them at some point if they get back on track.
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#7 evergrin

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 02:19 AM

I am also nearsighted. (I'm not a goblin and I'm not That old.) I take off my glasses when I want to paint something microscopic tiny. Without glasses, my eyes get fatigued easily and that limits my painting time. I feel blessed and cursed at the same time. :upside:
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#8 Nocturne

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 03:42 AM

I have Keratoconus so have to wear contact lenses as glasses could no longer correct my vision enough to see properly. I used to just take my glasses off to paint close up, now I use +3 ready readers and they do the job just fine.
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#9 siliconjedi

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 06:22 AM

3X Magnification Reading Glasses. .99 at the dollar store. Done.
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#10 DSModels

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 08:29 AM

I have Keratoconus so have to wear contact lenses as glasses could no longer correct my vision enough to see properly. I used to just take my glasses off to paint close up, now I use +3 ready readers and they do the job just fine.

I have these as well as 2.5 I think and the 3 do great to see detail but I tend to get head aches from looking up through them on mistake. I was hoping something like the visors would help better. I really need to go get my eyes checked for a real set of glasses too.
Thanks all for the reply's so far.

#11 psyberwolfe1

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 08:41 AM

The idea is to go with lowest strength you can get away with. I have 20/20 but I'm getting older. I use +2.00 readers for any magnification I might want but typically don't need them. The real trick for miniature painting is sufficient lighting. My painting area has three daylight adjusted (5500K) 75 watt equivalent bulbs. My eyes have loved me ever since.
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Does anybody else find it odd, by the way, that the information age has led to language becoming an oblique and imprecise tool where even the most straightforward phrasing is pored over with chicken entrails and bone tossing to divine the true meaning?


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#12 Niranth

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 09:29 AM

I am nearsighted and do without my glasses for non detail work. I have to put on my Optivisor and glasses for the fine detail. (As I get older, "fine detail" is less fine!). Psyberwolfe1 make a good point about light. I also prime white and use a very thin black wash to help define detail.
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#13 Furongian

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 09:59 AM

I've got a head set similar to MonkeySloth's. Around the time I turned 40 I started having trouble focusing on small details, so I picked up one of these at the local hobby store. Between that and a daylight bulb at my paint station, it is much easier to see and to paint for long stretches without eye strain.

#14 DSModels

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 09:59 AM

The idea is to go with lowest strength you can get away with. I have 20/20 but I'm getting older. I use +2.00 readers for any magnification I might want but typically don't need them. The real trick for miniature painting is sufficient lighting. My painting area has three daylight adjusted (5500K) 75 watt equivalent bulbs. My eyes have loved me ever since.

I'm going to look into the daylights today. LED or strait bulb daylights? At the moment I have 2 florescent strips that hang high above my work area for all around light but just one simple desk lamp with a regular bulb for close light. Amazing I got by with this for years, or did I "my eyes are telling me" :blink: .

#15 psyberwolfe1

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 10:40 AM

I'm going to look into the daylights today. LED or strait bulb daylights? At the moment I have 2 florescent strips that hang high above my work area for all around light but just one simple desk lamp with a regular bulb for close light. Amazing I got by with this for years, or did I "my eyes are telling me" :blink: .


I use Compact Flourescent bulbs that have a "light temprature" of 5500K. I bought them from a local light bulb shop. The up side is that they have very little heat and can be used in desk lamps that rate at 40W bulbs or less. Buy your bulbs by light temprature because otherwise you'll get bulbs that are blue, and by blue I mean blue.

2014 Painting Goal: 6 Figures/ 36 Painted as of 01/22/2014

For other Wargame and miniature related stuff you can read my blog at http://tacticalrock.blogspot.com

 
 



Does anybody else find it odd, by the way, that the information age has led to language becoming an oblique and imprecise tool where even the most straightforward phrasing is pored over with chicken entrails and bone tossing to divine the true meaning?


... nobody remembers Slave Leia because, "Oh my gosh! What innovative use of bronze."

 
 
Meep.jpg





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