Werewolvians

Painting Eyes

11 posts in this topic

I used to paint figures as a teenager, and then took a ten year hiatus. I've started painting again, and I'm much better at it now then I was then. However, I never did get the knack for painting eyes. Right now white with a spot of black is about where I'm at. It works ok with male figures, but when it comes to female figures it leaves much to be desired. (one mistroke and you have a transvestite) I was wondering if anyone has any tips. Starting with, how do you paint something that is almost microscopic, so well. What kind of brush do you use. A lot of times, I'll get my brush where I want it, but no paint will come off the brush, because you can't really apply any pressure, and you can't really have your brush soaked in paint. I know the (for instance) Dark blue dot, followed by a light blue dot, followed by a black dot, followed by a white dot. But I don't have a clue how you pull that off when you can barely get one dot on there without screwing up the whole face.

Also need help with applying makeup effects. I'm tired of my ladies looking butch, or lazy. They're not all natural beauties. They need some makeup.

Do i need a magnifying glass or something and a special brush?

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Head down to the Craft Corner for stuff like this, there is a Painting Tips & Advice subforum.

 

http://www.reapermini.com/TheCraft/12

 

For starters, don't try to run before you can walk. Don't try four-dot eyes until you can make a solid basic eye with just white and black. Practice makes perfect, I'm personally a long way from doing a decent basic eye still.

 

I don't use magnification yet, though I did buy a little clip-on 10x that seems pretty nice. For me, anything less than 10x is a waste. There was a recent discussion of sight enhancements:

 

http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?/topic/46063-beer-goggles-and-other-forms-of-second-sets-of-eyes/

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Thanks that was a lot of help. I always did the flesh first, and "I see" now that makes no sense. Can't wait to give it a go.

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Starting with, how do you paint something that is almost microscopic, so well. What kind of brush do you use. A lot of times, I'll get my brush where I want it, but no paint will come off the brush, because you can't really apply any pressure, and you can't really have your brush soaked in paint. I know the (for instance) Dark blue dot, followed by a light blue dot, followed by a black dot, followed by a white dot. But I don't have a clue how you pull that off when you can barely get one dot on there without screwing up the whole face.

 

Magnification helps. You can get that by taking off your glasses if you're nearsighted, by using reading glasses, or by using dedicated devices like Magnivisors. (I wouldn't recommend using non-binocular magnifiers, because I've had real problems using them in the past.)

 

Brushes: Use a larger brush with a good point. The solvent (often water) in the larger belly of a #2 brush (for instance) will keep the surface paint fluid enough to flow off of a brush where the very small belly of a 5/0 brush won't keep the paint fluid. To get that kind of point, you want a premium Kolinsky sable brush like those made by Winsor & Newton, da Vinci, or Raphael (there might be others in that class, but I know those manufacturers). Buy the largest premium brush you can handle; the cost is insignificant over the life of the brush.

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Eyes first, NMM last. That's my philosophy.

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You want to learn the almond technique as well. See the linked video.

 

If your paint is not coming off the brush, I think you need to thin your paint, or at least keep it wet? Besides conventional thinning, maybe try rinsing your brush tip, then dipping it a little in the paint. Maybe roll the tip of the brush into a point, to "thin" the paint and water on the tip of the brush. This holds very little paint on the brush, but that's all you need for eyes!

 

I found LTPK2 invaluable to help me paint female vs. male figures. Also, see this thread: http://www.coolminio...thread.php?3297

 

http://www.reapermin...mond-technique/

 

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See also this recent thread, "I Hate Painting Eyes":

http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?/topic/46194-i-hate-painting-eyes/

I replied to that thread (post #70) with a link to one of my older threads about painting eyes, and an exhortation to keep practicing.

 

I paint the skin (shading and highlighting), then the eyes. So I disagree that it "makes no sense" for everyone. :;): Different painters approach eyes in different ways.

I use a #1 with a good point to paint eyes.

 

Derek

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And I added a link to Derek's method to the Tutorials thread down in the painting help area.

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Old thread, but I'm finally getting around to using my 005 Micron Pen, and, yes, you can use it to paint eyes:

 

photo: http://www.flickr.co...57612982947151/

tips: http://theminiatures...sg.mv?id=221462

 

The ink doesn't dry instantly, so can be rubbed off with a damp brush. You can use it for blacklining, etc. Also, it's only $3 on Amazon. Worth a try!

 

EDIT: Probably want to move this to the Painting Tips forum. Thanks!

 

EDIT EDIT: Thanks for the warning, Monkeysloth! Sharpies run, Microns don't. But wait 24 hours first, and don't use Brush-on Sealers.

http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?/topic/6449-pigma-pens-and-dullcote/

http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=270541

http://bg.battletech.com/forums/index.php?topic=14940.0

 

Looks like someone else uses the MIcron + damp brush for shading and wet blending!

Edited by ced1106

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Be careful with the felt pens. Certain varnishes (pretty much any aerosol dull coat) will cause them to run.

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Tamiya from Japan has a whole line of pens meant for painting and lining of models. They are called Gundam Markers, and I have been using them for a long time with various sealants without any problems.

 

Halber

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