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pocketcthulhu

Pirate ships Or How I stole Metalchaos's idea.

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So first of all thanks to metal chaos for the idea, you can see the original thread and discussion on acquiring ships here http://www.reapermin...aiden-and-crew/

 

So lets start with the basics, the smaller ship is a Mega bloks Black Pearl and the larger Is the mega bloks Flying Dutchman.

The main issue with these ships is the hull are four separate sections as you can see I have attached each section using a combination of superglue and white glue when i ran out and loose 4x2 blocks btw these mega blocks are interchangeable with legos it seems if you need spare parts..

 

Also the goal of This is to have 2-4 ships with level decks with 5' grid markings for my skull and shackles game.

 

8244911153_e16cd7fbe0.jpg

My orignal worry was scale of the ships vs 28" minis but here you have a couple of examples (and as always forgive the crappy camera work)

8245978368_d772922ec0.jpg

 

8245978842_dfb4f7afe4.jpg

 

you can also see the major challenge that comes with these ships all those bloody nubs have to come off, Im going to grab a dremel kit to clean the upper deck.

 

Btw My nearly complete ship came in, so here's a idea of what the finished products will end up looking like.

8259254131_db79616f29.jpg

Edited by pocketcthulhu
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Thank you for the reference pocketcthulhu, but I really think Jordan Peacock as more experience then me using Mega Bloks toy boat for gameplay. Mine is not even completed yet. ;)

 

I used a dremel to remove the nubs, but be aware it will leave a hole as all the nubs are hollow. I had to fill the gaps with green stuff afterward. I'm not sure but I think Jordan Peacock is using popsicle (craft) sticks to cover his boat decks.

 

It's true, those boat are just at the right scale for use with 28mm figures.

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::):

 

We have one of those in disassembled chunks in the kids' playroom upstairs.

 

Hmm...

Edited by Pingo
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They have some that are 1/16" thick too.. sometimes they come cupped though.. but I've bought some nice pieces for some wood working projects..

 

The good thing with thinner wood is that if it is cupped you can get it wet and put it under something heavy to flatten it back out in a few days

Edited by SamuraiJack

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A couple of ideas I'll toss out:

 

Get a couple of the Pirates constructable mini game ships. Scale those up onto foam boards and built. Fairly easy to build, though you'll probably need to do some cutting on the inside of any curves to get it to bend properly.

 

Wooden coffee stirrers. You can get like 1000 for $11. These make excellent planks.

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I used Apoxie Sculpt (two-part epoxy putty) for filling the little holes that result after grinding off the "nubs." Ounce per ounce, it's cheaper than the green stuff, and you're going to have a LOT of decking to cover. While I was able to get by with covering up the deck of the Stormstalker, and you'd be able to do the same with most of the main deck of the Black Pearl, it's harder to get by with just "covering up" the nubs on the fore and aft castles. For those sections, I just stick with the Dremel (the circular cutting tool is the most efficient, in my experience, of the basic options), and then fill in any holes. You can also angle the cutter to "re-cut" any grooves that would indicate gaps between the planks that were "interrupted" by a nub.

 

For planks, the popsicle craft sticks make for pretty cheap decking, and you can cut and trim them with a sturdy pair of scissors. When I use the sticks for replacement decks, I first cut out a piece of mat board to the shape of the deck area I'm trying to fill, and then I glue the sticks down to that.

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I used Apoxie Sculpt (two-part epoxy putty) for filling the little holes that result after grinding off the "nubs." Ounce per ounce, it's cheaper than the green stuff, and you're going to have a LOT of decking to cover. While I was able to get by with covering up the deck of the Stormstalker, and you'd be able to do the same with most of the main deck of the Black Pearl, it's harder to get by with just "covering up" the nubs on the fore and aft castles. For those sections, I just stick with the Dremel (the circular cutting tool is the most efficient, in my experience, of the basic options), and then fill in any holes. You can also angle the cutter to "re-cut" any grooves that would indicate gaps between the planks that were "interrupted" by a nub.

 

For planks, the popsicle craft sticks make for pretty cheap decking, and you can cut and trim them with a sturdy pair of scissors. When I use the sticks for replacement decks, I first cut out a piece of mat board to the shape of the deck area I'm trying to fill, and then I glue the sticks down to that.

Yea I saw that in some of your photos and while it works the sticks bug me a bit, Off of the top of my head I was thinking of using the sticks for a base then using some thin wood for the main deck and painting that for a more solid look, I wanted a smooth surface so I can get a good 5' grid on these boats.

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You can also get small sections of 'craft' wood at the big box home improvement places. I use it all the time for trimming out light switch plates, over small access panels, etc.

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If you're going to cover the deck anyhow There isn't as much need to fill in the holes.. I'm sure drywall compound or spackle would work.. it's sandable and paintable..

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Yea I saw that in some of your photos and while it works the sticks bug me a bit,

 

Well, here's another option: Scored mat board. One of my Stormstalkers has a mat board deck, and it works just fine. I prefer black mat board, but if you're painting it anyway, it's not absolutely necessary.

 

1) Cut the mat board to fit the deck. Since you're going to be inserting it into an area flanked by railing, it can be hard to figure out exactly where to cut those lines to fit; I'd suggest using some cheap tracing paper to insert and use a pencil to make a template, then cut out the piece of board to match. Err on the side of cutting the piece too big, because you can always go back and trim down here and there until you've got a snug fit. For the Stormstalker, I left the central mast in place, and just cut a hole for the top of the plug to poke through the deck. For the Black Pearl, I raised the deck enough that I just went ahead and permanently reattached the piece where the mast plugs in onto the deck section itself (with a couple of blocks underneath to fill the gap underneath the "saddle" connector).

 

2) Once you're sure each deck piece fits, take it back out, then use a straight-edge as a guide, and score with a hobby knife to make "gaps" between the planks. At random, on occasion go back and cut a perpendicular line to indicate where a random plank comes to an end, and the next one begins. Then, with lighter cuts, make gently curving lines with a hobby blade to give a rough suggestion of wood grain. These cuts shouldn't be deep; you don't want to cut all the way through the board by any means. You just want it to be deep enough that if you dry-brush the board, the details will show up.

 

3) If the board isn't black, spray-paint it black (or dark grey or dark brown or whatever you please). Once it's dry, dry-brush with your choice of grey, light brown, mossy green, etc., with a larger old brush.

 

4) If the deck piece is spanning a lot of open space (e.g., it's a flat area that's leveling out over a large dip of an area, such as on the interior of the Stormstalker or Black Pearl), you might want to reinforce the underside of the deck in a few places to minimize bowing/compression. A few popsicle sticks would work nicely for this.

 

Note: While I say the deck pieces should be "snug," I really just mean that they should fit in the space without too much gap on either side. You don't really want the mat board fitting into place with PRESSURE against the sides, or else eventually (if not immediately) it will just bow up -- especially thanks to all those weak points made with the scoring for the plank texture.

Edited by Jordan Peacock
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If you're going to cover the deck anyhow There isn't as much need to fill in the holes.. I'm sure drywall compound or spackle would work.. it's sandable and paintable..

perhaps I misspoke/typed whatever but what I meant was to level out the huge depression in the center of the ship and even it out, I wasn't thinking of covering the forcastle. Edited by pocketcthulhu

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