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ronnke

Bending bones minis

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Is there a way to bend bones miniatures?

 

I have bought a bunch of bones, some guys with swords and a werewolf. Most of the guys have bent swords (in great need of Viagra), and the werewolf topples to the side because he has a lean towards the right (I'm guessing this was from his time in the blisters).

 

So does anyone have any suggestions. I was considering a hot water bath and then straighten everything up, but figured I would check here first, in case that would damage the model or someone had a better suggestion.

 

Thanks.

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There have been reports that hot water, repose, ice water results in figures that go back to their bent position after a day or so. I suspect that you need to push the temp up higher, but I'm not sure just how that should be done. With plastics, there's a fine line between "bendy" and "puddle".

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For resin and some other non-Bones plastic figs I have gotten water right at boiling in my tea kettle and done the hot, repose, cold thing with great success. I found that hot tap water just wasn't hot enough. Haven't tried this with Bones yet, but I expect it to work.

Edited by Erifnogard

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I wonder if compressed air would cool it off fast enough to hold it in place.. I'm guessing a heat gun on low will work too if you are careful

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Be pretty easy to have a bucket of ice water handy to dunk it in after you use the heat gun. Just don't dunk the heat gun! ;)

Edited by Erifnogard

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Thanks everyone for the suggestions. My findings are below.


I tried the hot tap water to no effect.

 

I then boiled a kettle, poured it into a cup and dunked the mini in for about 5 or so seconds. Without doing anything further, the mini returned to its natural pose. I don't think it was necessary, but after taking the mini out of the cup, I ran it under cold tap water.

 

100% success.. Now to paint. :)

Edited by ronnke
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The cold water step isn't strictly required, it just speeds up the 'setting' of the plastic in its new position. Helpful for pieces that you have to hold in position till they cool (usually this is fairly thin pieces I have found).

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With plastics, there's a fine line between "bendy" and "puddle".

 

With PVC, which these minis are made of, the melting point is on average twice that of boiling water. So you could leave the mini in a pot of boiling water until it all boils away and as long as it is under 400 degrees F, it will still be good.

 

Halber

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With plastics, there's a fine line between "bendy" and "puddle".

 

With PVC, which these minis are made of, the melting point is on average twice that of boiling water. So you could leave the mini in a pot of boiling water until it all boils away and as long as it is under 400 degrees F, it will still be good.

 

Halber

 

Sure, but when you're not using boiling water because you need higher than 100C to get the effect you want, things get interesting quickly. Other threads on this issue have implied that 100C is insufficient to repose and have the miniature stay in the new pose in the long term.

 

I pretty regularly bake my metal minis at 250F for half an hour to harden the surface. Works great and there isn't any danger to the figure or the paint. But when you heat a plastic mini so that it will get softer, you had better know what the range is between "soft enough to bend and reset" and "slumped down on the baking tray". I don't know what that range looks like and I haven't heard anyone with specifics on the working temperature range. If you know, please let me know. (Not a snark; I really do want to know.)

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I put mine if the fridge instead of using cold water. They look a bit weird in there, but I've had better results than with cold water.

Some things I've noticed can be bent back without hot water at all, primarily shield spikes and sword blades and other easily bent parts.

 

One of the great things about the Vampire pack from the KS all being in bags is that they wont have spent time being smushed up against a blister pack. :)

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I don't know what that range looks like and I haven't heard anyone with specifics on the working temperature range. If you know, please let me know. (Not a snark; I really do want to know.)

 

 

Well wikipedia says that the melting point ranges from 212°F to 500°F. Though truth to tell, there is no way to know the exact melting point for the particular PVC used in bones without either getting the Material Safety Data Sheet from the factory, or experimenting yourself with the bones. Another factor is that Reaper has stated that they have changed the PVC type from previous bones releases.

 

Though with the bones I do have, I can tell you I have an electric boiler that goes up to 300°f and have had no problems with them exposed to that temperature overnight, and that they melt with candle flame, which is 1100°f. Beyond that, you may need to experiment yourself. Though be careful because PVC is flammable.

 

Halber

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I'm hoping that there's a temperature at which permanent reposing is possible without losing detail to softness when you're bending to repose. I might have to try some experiments in March with cut-off bases or something.

 

Thanks.

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I run my tap water a bit hot, 140F. Popped my new "Bethalian" into a cup and ran the hot water over him for a minute. His staff was extremely pliable at that point, I held it straight and dropped him into a cold tap water cup. Left him in there (ok forgot about him while getting the house ready for xmas festivities) and he's back to normal.

 

So 140F is plenty to return a thin part to the original form, anyway.

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Bones plastic has better memory than other plastics, but thankfully Reaperbryan shared some info on the heat threshold Bones have.

 

'Reaperbryan', on 12 Nov 2012 - 11:08, said:
These figures are cast at over 500 degrees, and freeze near that point, between 400 and 500. When they come out, they are most vulnerable to being misshapen...

 

 

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