Jump to content

Spinward Bound

Some chalk with your Burgundy Wine, Sir?

Recommended Posts

aaaaahhhhh..... the 'not-runny' part would be what I've been missing.

 

 

Yeah - you know how with a wash you load up the brush and let it go all over the place? Well with a glaze you're sort of in between that and the amount of load you'd use for a layer. It's a bit less under control than a layer, not quite as runny as a wash - so you have to wick some of it off the brush before you apply.

 

And it's real thin because it's just slightly altering the colours underneath. I use it most often when I have to correct for bad transitions - like on my Bones flit where his wings are too starkly defined. I'll make a glaze of the midtone and then apply that over the offending area to tone it down and see if I can make the transition a little more easygoing.

 

Everybody will learn glazing eventually, because highlighting black is one of the most evil things to attempt and it's so very easy to overdo. When that happens and somebody looks at it, thinks it looks wrong, and then corrects it by using very thinned black to tone it down they're pretty much putting glazing into action.

 

You can do other stuff with it, too, if you want to get all fancypants with it.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buglips has it nailed on the head. There's not much difference between a glaze and a wash based off of how you make one, the real difference is how much you have on your brush and how you apply it. When I glaze, which is about 90% of a mini%, my brush is only barley damp and I'll test this on my finger. I want to to be wet to the touch but not leave streaks of liquid on my finger.

 

When making a glaze adding matte medium can be really helpfully but you cannot just water down paint with paint only (which is what matte medium is--pigmentless paint) so you still have to use water. I have several different consistencies for glazes, about 6-8:1 (water:paint) which is used for my base coat and is used for reclaiming and blending. A really thin 15+:1 of the base coat for blending as well (this is almost more a wash in how I use it) then 8-10:1 for my shades and highlights. Sometime, with highlights you need a thicker mix (hi white and flesh tones!).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went back and did a bunch of layers with some of the matte stuff mixed in and it got rid of most of the chalkiness. There is still some there but it's hard to notice unless I'm looking for it. I would have kept going but I was getting shadows where there shouldn't be any so called it quits.

 

 

I started glazing a different part with the same paints, this time starting with the matte medium mixed in, and got no chalkiness. (Well, maybe a "its probably all in my head" smidge, but nothing like last time.

 

 

I probably just need to work out my ratios of paint/matte/water.

Edited by Spinward Bound
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really need to see this in person. Mastering this will really help my ability to blend and knock my big butt into a wholenother skill bracket...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's very, very easy. Take a mini with a cloak that's got some folds. Paint it black. Next take a mid-tone gray and paint the raised parts, make it very stark. Allow to dry. Then thin down some black, say, 8 parts water to 1 part black, load a brush, wick it off on some paper towel - apply.

 

That's glazing. You'll immediately get what it's about and start thinking about ways to use it (normally you won't be glazing over something that stark, but it'll help you see what's going on as you practice). Like on my Takky thread doing the green head when I accidentally made the eyes look wasted. Quick glaze of ruddy flesh and, presto, like a blast of Visine. More monster than munchies.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only glazing you really need to do is the light base coat one and maybe a light highlights depending on what you're doing. Then you just feather between your colors (imaging alternating \\\\\ and ///// with your colors) then giving them a glaze. Repeat as desired.

 

I use glazing for most everything because basically I'm water painting on my minis and I love the range of colors you can get but it's also crazy slow.

Edited by MonkeySloth
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really need to see this in person. Mastering this will really help my ability to blend and knock my big butt into a wholenother skill bracket...

Go look at my dwarf woman in show off. (This is also the one that was getting chalky)

 

http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?/topic/47589-dwarf-woman/

 

Look at her belly and notice how the really dark purple blends into the red, that was me trying to glaze. Now look at the red stripe on her belly, that was me not glazing.

 

I wouldn't use that as a great example though, I'm still trying to figure it all out, but it really avoids the sharp lines between shades when blending.

Edited by Spinward Bound
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Dr_Automaton
      So the stars have aligned and Mudgullet has been released just in time for my group's Tomb of Annihilation playthrough.  I'm planning on going for a simple, suitably froghemoth-y color scheme but have realized that my palette is lacking in the greens department.  Oh, no!
       
      So, time to remedy this.  What should I grab from the MSP and Bones paint lines to give me a good selection of greens, while limiting the number of colors I need to buy (maybe 3-5 bottles this purchase)?  What are some of the colors you folk tend to reach for, with an eye towards versatility?  The Power Palette is only as good as the swatches it pulls from, and it's been my experience that Reapers paint swatches are very hit or miss, unfortunately.
       
      Thanks!
    • By strawhat
      OK, I don't want to put the cart before the horse, but are Reaper examining the potential for colorshift paints?  With those big bugs coming in Bones IV, now (or very soon) might be a good time for some sparkly shiftiness.
       
      If this can't be answered, that's OK--nuke away.  But I'd be curious to know the ifs and whys (if available).
       
      I just suddenly felt like I needed them.
    • By willmontgomery
      I have some Reaper-produced HD paints that came with white caps.
       
      I would like to obtain some black caps, in order to avoid the psychic pain of having paints that aren't configured properly. But the only caps that I could find in the Reaper store were white caps.
       
      Is there any hope for me? By which I mean, is there any hope that I could obtain black caps (for Reaper dropper bottles) from the webstore?
    • By willmontgomery
      1) Will these 12 new paints (73400-73411) be available for normal retail sale at some point?
       
      2) They claim to be HD paints, but they have white caps. What's up with that?
       
      3) Is there any chance of being able to purchase black caps for Reaper paint bottles? I could find only white caps in the store.
    • By SparrowMarie
      After a poll this seems to be the best place to put this thread. For the most part I'll stick photos under spoilers because my phone likes to make them large.
       
      So I bought a sketchbook today with the intent to catalog and show off all of my paints. I thought it was quite the appropriate book to get.
       
      First I made a grid on a page. Then added the title to each column: Name & SKU, None, Base, Wash, Brown Liner, Blue Liner.
       
       
      That's as far as I've gotten. Next I plan on starting to fill out paint names and SKU's. Then I will prime the squares with some plain white brush on primer (Vallejo in this case). I'm really hoping that the paper is thick enough to avoid the water from just being absorbed. If it isn't I will go to the craft store and buy a better book with different paper and can use this for something else later. 
       
      Each column is a different thickness of paint/what I'll be putting it over. So None is straight out of the bottle, Base is thinned enough for a base coat, Wash is thinned down to a wash consistency, and Brown and Blue Liner will have each of them put over the primer and then a base consistency paint over that. 
       
      I'm going to spend some time filling out the names and SKU's and then I'll get to priming the squares. Might go back and go over the lines with a sharpie or pen to make them a little more apparent where the lines are for my sake. 
       
      ETA: I already have a spreadsheet of all of the paints I own and then sub-sheets broken down by line/company. I think there is a way to put color samples into the sheet but I've yet to figure it out. So I'm making this so I don't have to pull out all of my paints when I need to color scheme something. I can just pull out the book and go from there. It'll be much more efficient for me.
  • Who's Online   25 Members, 1 Anonymous, 119 Guests (See full list)

×