Wren

Bones: Preparation (Glues, Putties, Mould Lines, Etc.)

92 posts in this topic

A-hah! That's why there was nothing left when I went in. I grabbed the sanding files, hoping they were similar enough to work the same.

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I made that sound a little more plundery than it was. ;-> There were only one or two packs, which we bought and split amongst us. Perhaps someone else who heard about them at the con hit the Hobby Lobby before we got there, or they just don't keep much of that product in stock.

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I made that sound a little more plundery than it was.

Arrr... take all ye can, give nothin' back! ;-D

 

I'm going to look for those sanding sticks. I've had similar problems with "fuzzing" on some Descent miniatures, which don't seem to be the typical plastic miniatures I've dealt with before (they almost seem like pseudo-Bones).

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I purchased around twelve Bones minis, so I could be playing around while I was waiting for my Vampire package to come, and I've had mixed results with the boiling/cold water method.

 

I was able to fix issues like figures leaning, and one bent sword, but I have two slightly bent swords on the skeleton minis, and a slightly bent unicorn horn where the figures revert back after a couple hours. I've also been trying to bend the bow of one of the archer minis (http://www.reapermini.com/Miniatures/Bones/latest/77021), but haven't had any luck. I've tried boiling/ice water, and I've tried boiling/cold water, but these few pieces insist on reverting back after a couple hrs. Anyone have any suggestions? It's a simple process, so I'm not optimistic that anyone can offer any advice, but I figure it doesn't hurt to ask. Worst case, I can live with them (it kind of makes sense for skeletons to have bent rusty swords anyway), but I've been trying to figure out what I can and can't do with Bones. I'd love to be able to re-position arms.

 

I ordered some sanding twigs yesterday, so I'm hoping they work out similar to the sanding needles...

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I don't have any additional suggestions for the boiling to reset issue. :-< There are a couple of longer threads on the topic in the forums, might be worth trying and posting in one of those.

 

For repositioning arms, my advice would be to cut and glue them. It's easy to cut the Bones material with a hobby knife, and you get a nice clean cut. It adheres well with superglue. It holds its memory so well that trying to bend it to reshape is probably not very viable, particularly on small parts like arms. People seem to be getting decent results reshaping the little dragon's wings, but that's a slightly different case.

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I might give that a try then. Thanks a lot for all the advice. Your write-up was very helpful!

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I wonder whether PVC pipe glue (used by plumbers) may work with Bones (as it seems it's a type of PVC)

 

If so it would give a 'fused' bond like polystyrene cement does on traditional plastic model kits

 

I've got some at home so when my Bones arrive I'll give it a go

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PVc pipe glue works as I recall by effectively "melting" the join together. Be very, very careful with it.

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Too early, no coffee yet, was confusing PVC pipe glue with PVA glue, got very confused.

 

I guess you must know about the safety precautions needed with PVC glue, that it has brutal solvents and you need a respirator when using it. The same strengths of those solvents worry me about melting delicate parts of the mini.

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Seriously, take a look at the material safety data sheet (MSDS) for any solvents* you buy.They're usually available on the manufacturer's website, but even if not, the mfr is required by law to send you a copy if you ask.

 

An example from low-VOC PVC glue is that it can form explosive peroxides with long enough exposure to air.

 

If you know your risks, you can mitigate them intelligently or make the decision to avoid the substance if you think it's too dangerous for you. If you don't, you're an impromptu science experiment waiting to happen.

 

Be safe.

 

* It's not a bad idea to look at the MSDS for any fluids you buy, though very few people do. Gasoline, for instance, is pretty nasty stuff.

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Thanks for the great suggestions for working with Bones.

 

I would point out however that "very hot" water is plenty hot. My figures were completely malleable after a few seconds (for the skeletons) or at most a minute (for the biggest one) is a pan of very hot water from the tap. That's maybe 140 degrees. So try that first before putting a put on the stove or reaching for the microwave.

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I would point out however that "very hot" water is plenty hot. My figures were completely malleable after a few seconds (for the skeletons) or at most a minute (for the biggest one) is a pan of very hot water from the tap. That's maybe 140 degrees. So try that first before putting a put on the stove or reaching for the microwave.

 

I suspect this largely depends on the individual's settings on their water heater. We don't keep ours turned up too high, so even our "hot" tap water isn't going to be hot enough for Bones repositioning.

 

Also, when I first read it I thought you said "My fingers were completely malleable after a few seconds...", and I was wondering just how high you kept your water heater... :lol:

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Here in Phoenix, the cold is often hotter than the hot side of the tap (as in, at my house it gives off steam and will burn you) for the first 30-45 seconds of water flow.

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I found filing/ sanding mould lines much easier if the figures are dipped in ice water put in freezer for a few minutes. This makes the figures less rubbery and more like traditional resin cast figures. Sanding and filing much more like what I was used to doing.

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Any tips or warnings on the wings of the Bones Clockwork Dragon? The wings appear to be made of a stiffer sort of polystyrene than the rest of the Bones plastic; I'm not certain how it might behave differently in response to spray paint, etc.

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