Wren

Bones: Preparation (Glues, Putties, Mould Lines, Etc.)

92 posts in this topic

Greenstuff and liquid greenstuff, depending on the size of the gap.

Not a huge fan of liquid GS myself, but it certainly would fit the bill here. And quicker than mixing up GS.

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Part of my concern was less what's in the mould release and more what happens if the Bones do melt or break or something, and gum up the works of my dishwasher. With everything I know about Bones, that's a remote chance, but I'm not rich enough to make my dishwasher the test subject and end up rolling a critical fail. :->

 

I have used a kitchen item (just a mug of water heated to bowling in the microwave, and another filled with ice water). I also scrub my palettes out in the kitchen sink, and have once or twice baked Sculpey in a food preparation oven. I don't know that any of these are great ideas or that I should be encouraging myself to do them or expanding the range of non-food prep activities that use my appliances and dishes.

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Save your fingers and try this first:

 

1. Fill a small ceramic bowl with boiling water and a little soap.

2. Toss the mini's into the hot water.

3. Put them in cool water.

 

NOW if they still don't bend, you can try your first-degree burn method of choice! :blush:

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So far I have found sanding needles for plastic as the most effective tool for removing mould lines on Bones.

 

Seconded!

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Just got my sanding needles yesterday, really excited to see them in action! :)

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

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So what are people favoring for gap filling? I've never had to fill gaps before, and there are tons of gaps in the Bones minis.

I have a 5 lb kit of Magic Sculpt that I've used successfully for fixing gaps on metal and vinyl figures. I don't anticipate any problem when it comes to using it on the Bones figures, but I haven't tackled those figures requiring it yet.

 

There's also a trick I use when I need to build up a surface quickly by using super glue and baking soda, but it's not very precise so I don't do it often

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For the n00bs:

 

+1 on the jeweler's engraver. Bones plastics are soft, so the engraver works *very* well on getting rid of the mold lines. Get them for $10 before a 40% off coupon at Michael's or whatever arts and craft store.

 

A set of $5 files is also useful -- for getting rid of mistakes! Since Bones plastic can be painted on directly, if you don't paint a flat surface correctly, or find some flash you didn't get rid of, just file it off and repaint! No need to re-apply primer.

 

Also, here's a good tutorial blog for painting Reaper mini's. Note which craft paints he uses if you want to save a few dollars on your paints:

http://allbonesabout.blogspot.com/2013/06/painting-my-first-kickstarter-bones.html

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OK, this is a stupid question, I know, and I have looked through these Q&A/info threads for a definitive answer and haven't found it: how imperative is it to wash Bones before gluing them together? I know it's important to do so before painting, and I assume it's important before gluing, but I was curious. I'm talking straight out of the box or plastic they were shipped in.

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I feel so silly. All this time, I've been hemming and hawing about boiling my Bones, afraid that I'd mess them up. I decided to just designate a pot and a beer pitcher for non-food use, filled the pitcher with very cold water, boiled the pot of water, threw in 5 figures that were severely bent at the ankles and 2 I wanted to reshape wings on, put a heat-proof spatula handle across the top of the pot to prevent boil-over and walked away for 5-10 minutes. The ankle problems mostly fixed themselves just being in the heat. Repositioning the wings was ridiculously easy. They're now hanging out in the freezer for a complete cool-down. Forget painting. I'm now a hobby boiler.

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The Bones I tested on were straight out of the blister and unwashed, so all my glue results pertain to them in that condition. Washing before gluing certainly wouldn't hurt, but doesn't seem to be necessary when using CA glue.

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The Bones I tested on were straight out of the blister and unwashed, so all my glue results pertain to them in that condition. Washing before gluing certainly wouldn't hurt, but doesn't seem to be necessary when using CA glue.

 

Thank you for the answer.

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If the pieces are not fitting together in a flush manner, you may want to consider boiling them, then fitting, then cooling and only then glueing them together.

 

This is only theory on my part, as I have not yet had the opportunity to play with my bones yet (I did make time to inventory them and look them over for defects).

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I found that while regular super glue works very well, Krazy Glue's Craft glue makes a very weak bond. The stuff is still cyanoacrylate, but they've added something to it that keeps skin from bonding instantly. Whatever that additive is, it's lousy for Bones.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Krazy-Glue-KG38548R-Precision-0-18-Ounce/dp/B000BKQSGY/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1375599815&sr=8-2&keywords=krazy+glue+craft

 

Avoid the stuff!

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Also, make sure your super glue isn't super old. I had that problem with my first glue job; the stuff stuck just fine to my finger when I accidentally got some on it, but did not make a lasting bond between the Bones pieces (this was after both boiling and washing). A new tube quickly solved that problem. The old tube I was using was nearly 5 years old.

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

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Any word on how spray-on sealers affect the plastic? Clear-coat, matte coat, and the like?

I use krylon matte finish. Works like a charm on metal, plastic and bones.

 

Also, I just bought a hobby knife. I highly recommend them for mould line removal. It was like running a knife thru warm butter so be careful when performing surgery ;)

Edited by jdizzy001
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