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Well done. Very informative.

 

I've had primers that remained tacky after spraying, and found that a quick shot of clear coat would cure them. Of course, it's better to not use them in the first place, but if you already have tacky miniatures, it could help.

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Have you tried airbrush primers, like Vallejo acrylic-urethane primer? Maybe the problem lies with the spray propellant. I've heard good things about this one, but I have yet to receive my minis.

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Yes, Future works very well, a drop or two of it with your water breaks down the surface tension of the wash and helps it flow easy, but be careful not to over do it. it has a tendency to become quite shiny if you do.

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Future has an acrylic base, so my guess is that it would work. I forgot to test it, but will try to find some time to do that and report back some time. (Bit busy right now getting ready to go to ReaperCon!) Though there have occasionally been people who find that Future doesn't work well with RMS paints, and in general I lean to the side of recommending that people use art/paint products with paint and reserve my Future for gloss coating.

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Snu; do you mean a wash straight on the Bones plastic?

Yes, that's what I was thinking -- a quick wash to get those zombies looking properly dead.

 

And Wren -- Thanks for writing up these guides! They look like a great resource for figuring out how to work with the Bones.

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Use a Medium to Thin Your Paint or Make a Wash

 

Update: Chris Palmer: Just add a little soap

http://allbonesabout.blogspot.com/2013/10/ink-washing-bones-to-bring-out-details.html

 

Wren's thread using Golden Airbrush Medium:

http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?/topic/47378-bones-wash-test/

 

Dan Goodchild: "Thin the wash with flow improver or airbrush medium instead of water and it will work fine."
ScoutII's comparison of airbrush medium vs. water:
iamfanboy recommends 2:1 water to Pledge Future floor wax:

Sean's review of a Bones miniature mentions using, as a wash, Reaper's black Brush-On Primer watered down:

 

Mikko used two coats of Games Workshop Badab Black and white drybrush:
purple_worm_washed.jpg?w=360&h=233
Nathaniel from TheMiniaturesPage suggested gesso, and 50/50 water and matte medium or glazing medium:
Leaning towards Pledge Future Floor Wax and paint for now...
EDIT: Nowadays, I'm doing that zenithal priming stuff for my miniatures and the Bones version is:
1. Slop on runny black Apple Barrel craft paint.
2. Drybrush mostly grey in the direction of the light source.
3. Drybrush partially white in the direction of the light source.
4. Optionally wash in black, or paint with black wash anywhere that needs blacklining or shadows.
The first coat of black craft paint doesn't completely cover the miniature, but the subsequent drybrushes do. If you don't have time for actual painting and you need the mini's for a game, you can use this technique to bring out the details of the miniature in black-and-white VERY quickly. You can also just apply the black craft paint. The raised areas of the Bones will not be covered in black, but that's acceptable, since these areas will eventually be highlighted when you do paint.
Edited by ced1106
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Thanks for this incredibly informative post and discussion!

I've been reading all the user-written faqs here and doing a lot of homework, because I'm used to painting harder plastic (or primed metal) with tamiya products; I'm not really a fan of the rubbery Bones plastic, since it's harder to smooth and paint and fully half of my minis came horrifically warped right out of the box. Personally, I wish they were hard plastic, like ABS minis or model kits, because this rubbery plastic requires a lot of straightening and apparently requires my investing in a whole new paint array.

But it is what it is, so I'm convinced enough to try the folk art glass and tile medium route, (aside from the necessity of occasional black primer base coats, which it appears the only truly viable option is black Reaper primer.) I've been poking around the local craft stores, and all I can seem to find is this:

http://www.plaidonline.com/folkart-enamels-mediums-clear-medium-2-oz/45/4035/product.htm

I'm assuming you intended for people to buy this product?

http://www.plaidonline.com/folkart-mediums-glass-tile-medium-2-oz/56/869/product.htm


I also saw this stuff on the shelves. It's pretty watery, and makes me wonder if if could be used for truly liquid washes:

http://www.plaidonline.com/folkart-enamels-mediums-flow-medium-2-oz/45/4060/product.htm

I'm going to miss my flat coat sealant sprays, as I'm pretty sure they won't play nice with these minis even after priming & painting, and I don't know of any acrylic or vinyl friendly flat finishing options. Gloss or Matte, sure. Flat, not so much.

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Thanks for this incredibly informative post and discussion!

 

I've been reading all the user-written faqs here and doing a lot of homework, because I'm used to painting harder plastic (or primed metal) with tamiya products; I'm not really a fan of the rubbery Bones plastic, since it's harder to smooth and paint and fully half of my minis came horrifically warped right out of the box. Personally, I wish they were hard plastic, like ABS minis or model kits, because this rubbery plastic requires a lot of straightening and apparently requires my investing in a whole new paint array.

 

But it is what it is, so I'm convinced enough to try the folk art glass and tile medium route, (aside from the necessity of occasional black primer base coats, which it appears the only truly viable option is black Reaper primer.) I've been poking around the local craft stores, and all I can seem to find is this:

 

http://www.plaidonline.com/folkart-enamels-mediums-clear-medium-2-oz/45/4035/product.htm

 

I'm assuming you intended for people to buy this product?

 

http://www.plaidonline.com/folkart-mediums-glass-tile-medium-2-oz/56/869/product.htm

 

I also saw this stuff on the shelves. It's pretty watery, and makes me wonder if if could be used for truly liquid washes:

 

http://www.plaidonline.com/folkart-enamels-mediums-flow-medium-2-oz/45/4060/product.htm

 

I'm going to miss my flat coat sealant sprays, as I'm pretty sure they won't play nice with these minis even after priming & painting, and I don't know of any acrylic or vinyl friendly flat finishing options. Gloss or Matte, sure. Flat, not so much.

 

Could you let us know what paint you normally use please? I get the feeling you use enamels, which should work. The plastic is designed for use with acrylics, but if you prime the Bones you should be able to use any paint you like.

 

[Edit]On rereading your post I think you're using Tamiya acrylics. I've heard of people using the clear red on Bones, but that's usually as an effect over a base coat so may not be representative. Regardless I'd expect them to work fine, I'd simply recommend that you test it first and make sure it adheres OK.

 

The flexiblity takes a bit to get used to but 96% of the Bones I've had to date (the pre-Kickstarter ones) have come right with a simple 'Boil and dunk into ice-water' method. They're also a lot less prone to damage, to either figure or paint, than metal.

 

Might pay to have a word to Buglips. I think he does, or did, a lot of model kit painting and might have some tips for cross-overs between the two disciplines.

Edited by Laoke

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Tamiya paint should work okay on Bones if they've been washed in dish soap and water. It probably wouldn't be my first choice, though, because my experience with Tamiya is that a second brush-on coat doesn't go on very well or smoothly. This has been my experience on plastic kits, I haven't tried it on Bones.

 

Tamiya's a strange animal of paint, in my experience. It does weird things, and is generally a pretty poorly behaved acrylic for miniature work. Investing in new paint does seem like a hassle, but overall what you'll use of it is far less than you'd go through in Tamiya paint and lasts longer. So you can build a robust selection over a span of time to help offset front-end costs. You'll also gain the better ease of use, mixing options, and a range of additives. Most mini paint is compatible with one another, as well.

 

Dollar per hour, minis is by far the cheaper hobby compared to plastic model kits.

 

For a matte sealent, Testors Dullcote has so far worked well for everybody.

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