Wren

Bones: The First Coat is the Difference

177 posts in this topic

I can make that happen. It won't be tonight, but that will be my project for tomorrow night.

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Are you experiencing this and testing on a single figure, or this was a batch you prepared in the same way? All my testing was with Bones straight out of the blister and unwashed. For personal use, I have been washing the Bones with dish soap and have not experienced problems like you describe. There was a fellow who posted a thread having problems with one particular figure in his collection, but he has not confirmed whether he continued to have problems if he tested on a few others. There are a few tips and ideas in that thread you could read through, also. http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?/topic/50633-working-with-rolf-the-bones-werewolf-sharing-some-lessons-learned-seeking-advice/

 

I believe there are some variations in the material mix so it's possible that an oddity will pop up here and there. If it's happening on a number of the figures, it might also be possible it relates to your cleaning method? Did you clean all of your figures that way or do you still have some that you haven't washed yet? If the latter, you could try cleaning one or two with just dish soap and see if it behaves differently, or even just try painting directly onto an unwashed one. If the former, you could try pouring some dish soap right on one of the figures and giving it a good scrub with a brush. If your citrus cleaner was anything like Goo Gone, it might take a bit of doing to get all of it off and maybe that film is interfering with the paint adhesiion?

 

Do you mount the mini on a holder when you paint? If you hold the figure directly when you paint, you're depositing your own skin oils on it that can sometimes interfere with paint, and you're also rubbing the paint before it has time to completely adhere. Acrylic paint is dry to the touch within seconds/minutes, but takes a bit longer than that to cure to full strength of adhesion.

 

Wren,

I hadn't read that thread before, but it remarkably mirrors my experiences.

 

This is the first whole figure I've painted from the KS set. Other than that, I've only done some quick paint checks on the bottom of various bases. And yes, I did put my entire KS package through the same cleaning process... and yes, I was getting worried I had ruined the whole batch, although I seem to have found at least a passable solution for now. My FLGS got their Undertaker shipment, so I picked up a few extra packs to use as "controls", but the quick-checks I did on them so far have not given noticeably different results.

 

I'll write up more of my test cases when I have more time and energy, but for now, here's the short version of my success story:

 

- Stripped with Simple Green, complete with a follow-up wash in soap and water.

- Brushed on a coat of Testor's Model Master Acryl Gray Primer (#4680), and let it dry overnight.

 

After that, the paints seemed to stick much better, although I am still having bits rub off on the edges. Yes, I do just hold the model in my hands, and I'm sure that isn't helping, but I have never had this much trouble on any figure before. Incidentally, I'm not a "newbie" painter; I'm no expert or world-class trophy winner, but I've painted up my fair share of minis over the years, so I have a lot of experience to go along with my bad habits. ;)

 

On that note, what do you use as a holder for Bones? Aren't they hard to remove if you superglue them to something?

 

- H8

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I took some pictures, but can't seem to find my photo software anywhere at the moment (I just reloaded this machine). Here is the previous link where I asked questions, and pictures. These are not Bones, but effect is the same.

 

http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?/topic/37983-gesso-as-a-primer/

 

 

And a great article on another forum.

 

http://www.dakkadakka.com/wiki/en/Priming_With_Acrylic_Gesso

 

Hope these help you guys (and ladies) out.

 

@Hatemonger I use a wooden spool with poster tack for holding my Bones and metal minis.

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@Hatemonger - You might try on one or two of the ones you just did the Simple Green/soap wash on or one that you've just washed with soap and water. If you end up just having a few problem ones in the batch, you can probably contact questions@reapermini.com about whether it would be possible to get replacements for those.

 

I'm trying to remember if I've super-glued a Bones to a holder for painting, but I have a terrible memory. I've certainly done it with other minis, and used a flat bladed sculpting tool I have to pop the figure off the holder. But I've also used double-sided tape (the thick carpet tape works best, but for Bones just the scotch tape style even works as they're so light). Good poster tack also works, though can work a little better on slotta bases as there is more to grip. I think I've heard of people using hot glue, but I don't have a hot glue gun to test that out myself. I will try to test using superglue to tack down a Bones and see if I can pop it off.

 

For the holders, I've used or seen used various things over the years, including old prescription bottles or vitamin bottles (you can weight them with pennies or something), dice cubes, Pro Paint tubs, lengths of dowel, wooden spools you can get in the wood section of a craft store. Basically anything that feels comfortable in your hand with a flat top. Once you try it you'll probably wonder how you did without it. Makes it so much easier to orientate the mini so you can get into those weird crevices and such.

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I've used hot glue to attach Bones to holders. It's rather effective.

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I tested supergluing a Bones to the plastic lid of a prescription bottle tonight. After I finished painting it I slide the blade of a hobby knife in between the Bones and the lid and the figure popped off no problem.

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poster tack is hit or miss so far for myself, though I've only tried one generic brand. i imagine the super glue thing didn't really pan out how you thought.

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The supergluing worked out pretty much how I thought it would (which was just fine) and similarly to when I've done the same thing with metal minis.

 

Poster tack differs wildly in stickiness and effectiveness. I've had some very disappointing ones. The brand I'm using is discontinued, I ordered several packs when I found that out. I know there are others that work well that other people use, I just haven't had to shop around on that for years so I don't have a specific one to recommend unfortunately. :-<

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so far I've been using sticky tack and a wooden dowel (as opposed to a cork, i tend to grip pretty tight it seems) with varied success. models that I bother to base I just clip my hemostats to the underside of the base and that suits me just fine.

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@Starminer: Here's Hyun's gesso as primer article reprinted: http://miniaturereview.blogspot.com/p/priming-with-acrylic-gesso.html

 

Seriously, Bones does not need primer. IIRC, the OP says you can slap on paint and use that as your undercoat. I've read *plenty* of posts where XYZ primer leaves a tacky surface and, iirc, *no* posts where plain ol' hobby and craft paint does the same. Of course, I also know several Reaper KS Bones backers who are giving away the miniatures and otherwise experimenting on them, so it's not like you shouldn't test how well your square peg fits into the round hole.

 

Here's what I do:

1. Trim flash with a jeweler's engraver.

2. Wash Bones in very hot soapy water. Unbend.

3. Hold bendy Bones under running cold water. (If ice water is more convenient, do that.)

4. Trim flash with a jeweler's engraver. Because you will miss flash.

5. Sticky tack miniature on a painting pot. Use big gob.

6. Slop on runny black Apple Barrel craft paint. Because shadows.

7. Trim flash with a jeweler's engraver. Because you will miss flash.

8. Drybrush grey craft paint. Zenithal whatever.

9. Trim flash with a jeweler's engraver. Because you will miss flash.

10. Dust white craft paint. Zenithal whatever.

11. Trim flash with a jeweler's engraver. Because you will miss flash.

12. Wash in black (optional). Shows details.

13. Trim flash. Ignore white spots, or color black or white or grey. You're just going to paint over it, anyway.

 

Oh, and it's easy to miss the flash on these Bones until after painting, so might as well find it during this prep stage.

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Oh, and it's easy to miss the flash on these Bones until after painting, so might as well find it during this prep stage.

 

Painfully true. I finally painted my Young White Dragon (one of my first bones) and missed all of the flash. I didn't see any of it until I went to edit the pictures I took.

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Yeah im having issues with the bones I bought. I even tried fo primer it and the paints not working outnto well however it may be my bad since all I have is gw paint

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GW should work ok, unless I missed something. I have had most Bones work perfectly, but one or two were very sensitive to rubbing and handling. However I'm mostly using Reaper paints plus a little bit of Vallejo and some older formula GW.

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Has anyone tried using tan / ochre as an undercoat (followed by a brown wash)? I normally wash in brown ink, but that doesn't work well directly on Bones, and figure that I'd try something besides white, at least for my Swamp Things. I'm thinking that ochre is closer than white to browns, and, when glazed, makes yellow look more organic. It's still light enough that I can paint white on it without having to apply it thickly.

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