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Has anyone tried using tan / ochre as an undercoat (followed by a brown wash)? I normally wash in brown ink, but that doesn't work well directly on Bones, and figure that I'd try something besides white, at least for my Swamp Things. I'm thinking that ochre is closer than white to browns, and, when glazed, makes yellow look more organic. It's still light enough that I can paint white on it without having to apply it thickly.

I painted a set of my rats in reaper Tanned shadow then used brown wash. They look pretty good.
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Just to be clear for us clueless folk... If I want to copy what you did with the rats, I can paint with a base coat (you did tanned shadow) - can I just use a thinned Reaper paint for my "wash"... or did you do something fanicier like ink or something?

 

(I'm always trying to find the 20% of effort I need to do to get the 80% of the work done... especially as I"m totally new to this... getting minor success will help lead to later, greater efforts I would assume... it's not like I'm gonna run out of figures to paint...)

 

-Matt

 

 

Has anyone tried using tan / ochre as an undercoat (followed by a brown wash)? I normally wash in brown ink, but that doesn't work well directly on Bones, and figure that I'd try something besides white, at least for my Swamp Things. I'm thinking that ochre is closer than white to browns, and, when glazed, makes yellow look more organic. It's still light enough that I can paint white on it without having to apply it thickly.

I painted a set of my rats in reaper Tanned shadow then used brown wash. They look pretty good.

 

Edited by happycamper
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Well, if you're asking if you can undercoate / basecoat then wash, absolutely. Once the first layer of paint(s) covers the plastic, you can paint it like any miniature. Personally, I would wash with Quickshade Strong (brown) Tone Ink, but you can make up your own wash from paints or whatnot.

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Just to be clear for us clueless folk... If I want to copy what you did with the rats, I can paint with a base coat (you did tanned shadow) - can I just use a thinned Reaper paint for my "wash"... or did you do something fanicier like ink or something?

 

(I'm always trying to find the 20% of effort I need to do to get the 80% of the work done... especially as I"m totally new to this... getting minor success will help lead to later, greater efforts I would assume... it's not like I'm gonna run out of figures to paint...)

 

-Matt

 

 

 

Has anyone tried using tan / ochre as an undercoat (followed by a brown wash)? I normally wash in brown ink, but that doesn't work well directly on Bones, and figure that I'd try something besides white, at least for my Swamp Things. I'm thinking that ochre is closer than white to browns, and, when glazed, makes yellow look more organic. It's still light enough that I can paint white on it without having to apply it thickly.

I painted a set of my rats in reaper Tanned shadow then used brown wash. They look pretty good.

I painted with Reaper tanned shadow, including the base. I drybrushed the stones with Stormy grey then with Rainy Grey. I then painted paws and tail with Brain Pink. And washed everything including base with Reaper Brown Wash straight from the bottle.

 

At work so can't take pics. :(

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Random Reminder:

 

SCRUB THEM WITH DISH SOAP BEFORE YOU DO ANYTHING ELSE.

 

The release agent on fresh bones is a real SOB.

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Well, if you're asking if you can undercoate / basecoat then wash, absolutely. Once the first layer of paint(s) covers the plastic, you can paint it like any miniature. Personally, I would wash with Quickshade Strong (brown) Tone Ink, but you can make up your own wash from paints or whatnot.

 

OK, so for a "wash" one can use special inks or special pre-made "washes", but is also OK just to mix up regular reaper paint with a bit of extra water? (Just bought a basic set of reaper paints, was hoping to avoid having to buy a set of washes/inks as well..)

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Well, if you're asking if you can undercoate / basecoat then wash, absolutely. Once the first layer of paint(s) covers the plastic, you can paint it like any miniature. Personally, I would wash with Quickshade Strong (brown) Tone Ink, but you can make up your own wash from paints or whatnot.

OK, so for a "wash" one can use special inks or special pre-made "washes", but is also OK just to mix up regular reaper paint with a bit of extra water? (Just bought a basic set of reaper paints, was hoping to avoid having to buy a set of washes/inks as well..)

You certainly can! I do that myself when I want a very specific color. But I've got a small hoard of paints and using bottled washes is easier. Edited by Argentee

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Well, if you're asking if you can undercoate / basecoat then wash, absolutely. Once the first layer of paint(s) covers the plastic, you can paint it like any miniature. Personally, I would wash with Quickshade Strong (brown) Tone Ink, but you can make up your own wash from paints or whatnot.

 

OK, so for a "wash" one can use special inks or special pre-made "washes", but is also OK just to mix up regular reaper paint with a bit of extra water? (Just bought a basic set of reaper paints, was hoping to avoid having to buy a set of washes/inks as well..)

 

 

Once you've base coated them you can do a wash no problem at all. If you want to do one before the base coat, I've had some success with a wash made not from water but with arylic medium (aka Reaper Brush-on Sealer, amongst other things...).

 

Oh! Yes, you can create a wash from just about any of the Reaper paints - I typically do a wash of Walnut Brown for a lot of stuff, but I've also used LED Blue, Clear Yellow, Clear Red, Clear Blue, Clear Green, and Clear Magenta recently.

Edited by Laoke

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This is a link to a gamer's video testing Bones, plastic and metal miniatures against common gaming stresses. (There's a separate discussion of this in the Bones forum, but it will eventually scroll down, so I wanted to archive the link in this thread, also.)

 

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Well, if you're asking if you can undercoate / basecoat then wash, absolutely. Once the first layer of paint(s) covers the plastic, you can paint it like any miniature. Personally, I would wash with Quickshade Strong (brown) Tone Ink, but you can make up your own wash from paints or whatnot.

 

OK, so for a "wash" one can use special inks or special pre-made "washes", but is also OK just to mix up regular reaper paint with a bit of extra water? (Just bought a basic set of reaper paints, was hoping to avoid having to buy a set of washes/inks as well..)

 

 

That should work. If there's a Michael's or Hobby Lobby near you, get the store's 40% off coupon, and look for Liqutex matte medium. Maybe six bucks for all you'll need:

http://theleadheadblog.blogspot.com/2010/07/making-your-own-washes.html

 

If you're on the cheap, hang around Dakka Dakka's News and Rumors forum for the holiday sales!

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I have found painting them straight is a BAD CALL. After washing in soap and boiling to get the bent ones back to shape (boiling seemed like it'd be a hassle but was fun, most moved back to the correct possition after boiling automatically, than put in a bowl of ice water).

 

I used a GW primer, fenris grey I think, it dries in minutes, it constricts, hugging to the edges to accenting them. The model then has so much texture that I can use very watered down paints in multiple layers without losing the fine detail.

 

Bones loses a lot of the fine detail of buckles and buttons so anything to preserve that is a win for me. I have painted a dozen bones in the last two months and this is definitely my preferred method.

 

The primer goes on much thinner than paint right out of the pot, even thin paints like P3. If you want them to look good dont paint unthined paints right out of the pot.

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I understand some like to use "Glass and Tile Medium" (Folk Art) as a primer; but it's pretty hard to find it in a store, and I remember seeing some comments wishing it came in something other than a 2-oz bottle.

 

Here's option B:

http://store.weberart.com/index.php?app=ccp0&ns=prodshow&ref=2856

 

Comes in an 8-oz bottle, the price is reasonable, and the shipping isn't bad either.

Martin F. Weber have been in business for decades; they don't make uber high-end paints/inks, but they don't make junk either.

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The primer goes on much thinner than paint right out of the pot, even thin paints like P3. If you want them to look good dont paint unthined paints right out of the pot.

 

I've been painting my Bones with no primer and slightly-thinned paints (primarily Vallejo Game Color, but some Reaper MSP), and haven't had any problems with paint obscuring details. Unless someone is using some fairly thick paint, I don't think they're likely to have issues with this.

 

I have noticed that thinned paint doesn't necessarily want to cover Bones easily, but so long as it isn't over-thinned (such that it's beading up) you can incrementally cover an area with multiple thin coats until it sticks (again, primarily working with VGC here). Priming really just seems like an unnecessary step to me, so long as the miniature is sufficiently washed/cleaned beforehand. I've painted 40+ Bones figures and haven't had any problems thus far.

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I thinned down and slopped on some overly thick craft paint with Les' Wash (1:1 matte medium : water + additives) to a wet consistency, and didn't have any beading. The stuff applied "thick" so I left it alone and let it dry. AFAIK, No loss of details, but watch out for small bubbles. On regular miniatures, I think I'll stick to a coat of light-colored paint, while on massive ones (yes, painting Kaladrax!) the paint + wash sped up the first coat immensely. I'm going to try the standard Les' Wash with Liquitex Ink in a few weeks and see what happens!

 

EDIT: Picked up some Liquitex acrylic ink to make washes, and they work fine thinning down paints to a more milky / watery consistency to apply on Bones. You can do stuff like mixing / blending on the fly with a drop of paint and drop of ink on the wet palette, then mixing by the brushful (eg. white ink and blue paint for ice effects). Pretty obviously, the color's going to be pretty saturated if you mix Blood Red with red ink!

 

CMON thread: http://www.coolminiornot.com/forums/showthread.php?49149

Edited by ced1106
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Just to add my experience with Krylon primers:

 

I found that their Dual Paint + Primer series is good, but only if you get the Flat version (not Satin or Glossy).

I started out with the Satin, and the bones minis that I primed stayed tacky for a very long time (it took about a month for the tackiness to go away). After switching to Flat, I've haven't been having any issues with tackiness.

According to their website, Krylon only makes Flat in black and white (in their Dual Paint + Primer series anyways)

 

Also, if it matters, I live in Canada and I try to spray indoors (in my garage) so that the air isn't too cold when I am spraying. I don't think that has affected my results, but I thought I'd mention it.

 

Happy painting, everyone!

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