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OneBoot's Bones (and other things) WIP - picture heavy!

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So, in anticipation of my Kickstarter Bonenami arriving SoonTM, I decided to start my own WIP thread, even though I currently only have one Bones mini to my name. I decided to get a bugbear as my practice mini, (my tiny FLGS only had about 5 Bones to choose from :/ ), just to see what I was in for and familiarize myself with filing, boiling, painting and stripping paint, etc.

 

These first three pics are of him straight out of the package.

 

Needs boiling, obviously:

post-11389-0-64725100-1371526414_thumb.jpg

 

He also looks like he was the victim of a botched beheading:

post-11389-0-81106000-1371526478_thumb.jpg

 

Lastly, the straps that are supposed to be holding his shield to his arm are, instead, only attached to his arm. While I could forgive maybe one strap in this condition, all four attachment points are currently floating and it just looks silly:

post-11389-0-73598100-1371528204_thumb.jpg

(edit: I retroactively took this picture after doing some work, in case you noticed that his neck looks better now. I'll detail more in my next post)

 

Clearly, he's gonna need some work before I even think about touching paint, so it looks like I chose a good one for learning on! 

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

Edited by OneBoot
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First step, boiling! I prepped a bowl of super cold water first (I was out of ice cubes and was too impatient to wait for some to freeze). Then, I actually just heated a cup of water in the microwave to boiling, then dunked Mr. Bugbear's mace(?) in for about 10 seconds. It was super cool to see just how floppy it got in such a short period of time. I wiggled it a couple of times to make sure it would stay straight, then dropped him into the cold water for about 5 minutes. He stiffened up pretty quick, and this is the result:

post-11389-0-62962100-1371528910_thumb.jpg
Much better!
Next, to do something about his neck. I used white (not pure white) Apoxie Sculpt, and I was pleased with how easy this stuff was to work with. It acts just like clay (which, having done a lot of ceramics work, makes me happy), and smooths well with water. I only had a toothpick to work with, but given that I wasn't doing any extreme detail work, meant that it worked well enough for what I needed:
post-11389-0-31615000-1371529130_thumb.jpg
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Lastly, his shield. I couldn't find my superglue, so I tried some clear craft glue which failed miserably. It was too goopy for the tiny area I was trying to glue, so I tried harder to find the superglue and eventually found it. Now, maybe it's just me, but it shouldn't take SEVEN tries to glue two pieces of plastic together, which makes me suspect that my glue is way old. It eventually worked, but I got a lot more on the shield itself than I wanted to. At least it's attached now:
post-11389-0-55063100-1371529437_thumb.jpg
Anyone know how well superglue takes Reaper Master Series paint? Will I need to use primer on the supergluey spots for it to stick?
Now it's time to let the Apoxie set for 24 hours, then I'll scrub him down with a little dish soap and start painting! I don't have my Reaper paints yet (aside from two metallics and an orange which I ordered separately, as well as a greenish-blue sample bottle that came with it) since they're all coming with my pledge, so I'll be using whatever craft paints I have on hand in the meantime. This is more of a learning experience than trying to get a finished mini, which means I'll also be able to see how well Simple Green works for stripping paint from minis without damaging either the Apoxie or superglue.
Huzzah!
--OneBoot :D
Edited by OneBoot
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Seeing your bugbear caused me to look at mine to double check. It turns out that mine has pretty much the same issues. The bend of the club is less severe for me, but still needs boiling and the neck and shield issues are at least as bad as yours. I will keep an eye on this WIP.

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Sorry to hear that your bugbear ended up like mine! Keep in mind that I'm brand new to minis, so take any advice I might give with a shaker full of salt. I'll pretty much just stick to saying what I did, what I used, and whether it did/didn't work and what I did/didn't like. :)

 

I should have mentioned that to fix the shield, I used a toothpick to put the glue where I needed it, then used the clean end of the toothpick to hold the strap in place while pressing from the other side with my finger. It was the only way to get the tiny strap to stay in place, since my finger just couldn't fit in there, and it worked like a charm (once I got my thrice blasted glue to set).

 

Once I start painting I'll be using a combination of craft paints, Reaper MSP, and Folk Art Glass and Tile Medium, and I have no idea how well they'll all play together, but I'll keep careful notes so we can all learn from my mistakes. :)

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

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Bones loves superglue. It's the recommended adhesive. Painting over it isn't much trouble, so long as the paint coat is undiluted (which it would need to be for the material anyway). The Bones glued at the factory frequently have glue spill I paint over.

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Awesome, thanks buglips, that's good to know. :)

 

I checked on the Apoxie this morning, and it seems to have hardened up quite nicely. However, the instructions say that after 24 hours, it's "Hard, cured and waterproof," so I'll just have to contain my impatience until this afternoon, since I don't want to go scrub him and end up undoing all my hard work!

 

While I was waiting, I decided to paint the tops of my Reaper MSP bottles with the paint inside them, as per another poster's great idea, and I had a little bit of Antique Gold and Honed Steel left on my plate (I really need to get me a palette and/or make a wet palette). So, I decided to try out a wee bit of drybrushing just for the heck of it (also, I was bored):

 

post-11389-0-96064600-1371575477_thumb.jpg

 

I learned a few things pretty quickly. a) I can see why people recommend using cheap brushes for drybrushing (I used a cheap brush). I can easily see the brush getting destroyed after only a few minis due to the scrubbing the brush is put through. b) A very soft, very flexible brush probably isn't a good one to use for detailed drybrushing. While the mail on the shoulder turned out okay (I know the pic is at a bad angle to see it, sorry about that), his arm guard ended up with paint in a lot of places other than the studs. I remember seeing a video where the person used a flat, slightly stiff brush to give him more control, so maybe I'll try that. c) I really need to find the macro setting on my camera. Either that, or get better with getting the focus in the right place, since it's the mini we're all interested in seeing clearly, not my fingers. :)

 

I also discovered that, possibly due to the flexibility of the Bonesium, the shield straps had pulled off again (insert rageface here). So, I'll get some new glue later and fix it before painting.

 

Oh, I forgot to mention mold lines (also called flashing). This guy actually had surprisingly few, and I had to really look before finding a small one on his mace (it didn't really show up on my camera, so you'll just have to use your imagination). I bought a set of small, cheap files (not diamond ones, the kind with the crosshatches) and I think I'll upgrade to diamond files sometime in the near future. While these ones worked alright, they were difficult to control on anything other than a flat-ish surface (this may be true of all files, I wouldn't know). I'd read that the best way to file off mold lines was to file in one direction, then finish up with a few strokes in the opposite direction to get rid of any fuzzy bits that are left. I tried this with only moderate success. I found that when I alternated a few strokes one direction, then a few strokes in the opposite direction, not only did I have better control over the file, the flashing came off a lot more cleanly.

 

Random sidenote/question: I noticed on the holder that my files came in, it had a warning on it which reads: "Pursuant to California Health and Safety Code Section 25249.6, the distribution of this product warns you that this product may contain substances known to the State of California to cause cancer and/or reproductive toxicity." Does this refer to the holder, the file handles, or the files themselves? Should I just be careful not to eat them (not that I normally would, lol), or should I worry about washing my hands after using them/wearing gloves while using them? It had a fairly strong plastic-y smell when I first got them that is still lingering weeks later, is this what the warning is referring to?

 

I guess that's all for now, can't do much until the Apoxie is fully set and I've got his shield straps (back) in place. I might dig around in our board games and see if any of them have minis I can mess around with. :)

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

Edited by OneBoot

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Having acquired superglue, I was about to reglue the shield, when I remembered buglips posting in his Bugbear WIP that the shield was a pain to work around, so I decided to leave it as-is until I'm done painting. Unintended bonus!

 

For a palette, I glued four rubber feet onto the bottom of a plain ceramic tile, since it'll clean up easily and won't stain. I then scrubbed both the tile and the mini with a drop of dish soap each, using a clean toothbrush (my father-in-law is a dentist, so I've got a ton of extras), and rinsed them well.

 

First step is blacklining, which will fill in all the little gaps so that if they're missed later on in the painting process, it won't be white showing through. I'm using the Reaper Pro Paint #2 Flat brush for this step, since it's big enough to give good coverage, while also being small enough to get in the little spots. I stuck the mini on an empty dice case with Sticky Tack.

 

Picture of my workstation:

post-11389-0-31402100-1371606893_thumb.jpg

 

I mixed 3 drops of Apple Barrel black acrylic paint with about 2 drops of Folk Art Glass and Tile Medium (GTM), since the paint was kind of goopy and I've heard that using water to thin when painting Bones doesn't work well. I discovered that GTM is VERY watery, so be careful while pouring. The result was thinner than I wanted, so I added another drop of paint, which did the trick.

 

I decided that anything that wasn't actual bugbear would get blacklined, and the rest would get brownlined to give him a more natural look. Look at me pretending to know what I'm talking about. :blush:

 

post-11389-0-28848000-1371608618_thumb.jpg

 

post-11389-0-17184800-1371608634_thumb.jpg

 

post-11389-0-20623100-1371608649_thumb.jpg

 

Sorry the lighting's not the greatest, but I work with what I got. :)

 

Next step: drybrushing!

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

Edited by OneBoot
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I decided to drybrush all of the metals next, so any mistakes will be covered up by either the brownlining, or by paint later. That's the theory, anyways. I used undiluted Antique Gold and Honed Steel, cuz those are the only metallics I've got right now.

 

So, I've pretty much decided that drybrushing is kind of magic. These bits that were flat black before transformed into grungy, tarnished looking metal right before my eyes! So cool, and so much fun. :)

 

The first brush (the top one in the picture) had bristles that were waaay too stiff, and barely put down any paint at all. The next one I tried (the blue one) was okay, but too flat for the spiky mace. The last one I settled on had softer, slightly longer bristles that could really scrub down in there well, so I think I'll use this one from now on (until it dies):

 

post-11389-0-45282900-1371611836_thumb.jpg

 

Something I learned is that drybrushing actually uses a lot more paint than I'd expected; I ended up using 4-5 drops of the steel by the end. When I first started, I was wondering why it wasn't looking very metal-y, and then I realized that I was actually rubbing off too MUCH paint because I was afraid of having too much on. Things went better after that.

 

I don't think I like the silver for the shoulder mail cuz I don't think it stands out all that well, but I like it okay everywhere else that I put it. I would have liked something shinier, but again, paint options are limited. I am once again thankful that I didn't re-glue the shield, since it made drybrushing the inside edge of the shield a lot easier.

 

post-11389-0-71655000-1371612050_thumb.jpg

 

post-11389-0-99156100-1371612073_thumb.jpg

 

post-11389-0-71743300-1371612089_thumb.jpg

 

Next, I think I'll do the brown-lining. Whether this step is actually necessary, I don't know, but practice is good.

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

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Okay, so I've learned some things. Firstly, that Folk Art Bark Brown acrylic paint is TERRIBLE for lining. It's both very goopy and gives poor coverage, which I didn't think was possible (though I think it will do alright for highlights later if I use very little). Secondly, that it's not actually a good idea to do some lining, then drybrushing, then more lining. It was difficult working around the areas that I'd already drybrushed, so now I know to do all my lining in one fell swoop at the beginning. Learning experience! If I keep getting experience at this rate, I'll level up in no time. :upside:

 

First, I mixed a, um, glob of the brown (equivalent to maybe 6-7 drops) with 4 drops of GTM (I only meant to put in 3. I seriously need to find an actual dropper to put this stuff in, it's kind of ridiculous how runny it is). This is the result:

 

post-11389-0-04822700-1371615115_thumb.jpg

 

I wasn't very happy with either the coverage or how light it was, so I decided to add a drop of the black. This darkened it up nicely, but it was still not covering well at all, and a lot of the small detail on the face was getting obscured due to the goopiness:

 

post-11389-0-32325700-1371615132_thumb.jpg

 

So, I threw my hands up and just smothered the rest of him in black (cue Rolling Stones singing "Paint it black"). I can't see his eyes anymore, but the rest of him is okay:

 

post-11389-0-08768300-1371615206_thumb.jpg

 

post-11389-0-80993100-1371615228_thumb.jpg

 

I decided to try my unholy brownish-black goop on the ground, since I want it to be dirt with drybrushed grassy stuff over it, and there's no detail on it that I care about. It had dried slightly by then, so it went on a lot better and I was able to glob it all over pretty easily (sorry again for the lighting, I promise it's actually brownish):

 

post-11389-0-12311600-1371615253_thumb.jpg

 

Now I have to wait for that to dry. It'll give me time to decide what to do for his skin.

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

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For the undercolor of his skin (the color that will just show up in the crevices and help define his muscles), I mixed 5 drops of MSP Lava Orange with 2-3 drop equivalents of the Bark Brown. I also learned that craft paints and MSP do not mix easily, but after much stirring they finally blended. I used Reaper's Pro Paint Round #0 brush, assuming that it would get into the nooks and crannies well (which it did).

 

Brush control seems to be something that I'll need to work on a lot more than I was expecting. I got paint in a lot of places I didn't intend to, including a few already dry-brushed areas, which is annoying.

 

I also learned the hard way that whatever paint you use to line, make sure it's not too thick, because even though the Apple Barrel black seemed to be doing a fine job, it actually obscured more of the detail than I'd expected, making it difficult to determine where the skin ended and the fur began in several places.

 

This is Mr. Bugbear with one coat of the skin undercolor:

 

post-11389-0-48913400-1371618827_thumb.jpg

 

post-11389-0-69436800-1371618844_thumb.jpg

 

I'm quite happy with the color, I think it will do nicely. Now I'm just hoping I can replicate it for the second coat! Oddly enough, he seems to photograph a lot better when there isn't a paper towel behind him (maybe due to my camera reacting to less white?).

 

I think I'll call it quits for the night, since I'm getting a bit of a headache and my eyes are tired. I'm becoming increasingly convinced that I should invest in a Helping Hands.

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

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Wow, it looks amazing so far. I got a helping hands thing with little alligator clips (what I call them) on the end. I was not thinking about bones being so soft and now one of my little dragons has alligator teeth marks on the end. I have found it very useful, mostly due to my hands shaking so bad. Mine does not have a magnifying glass on it but I have a lamp that has has one so I just got the normal one.

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Wow, thanks! I feel like I've just barely started, even though I've done so much with him already. I'm starting to think I might just leave him as-is when I'm done, sort of like how I saved my first ceramics project that was the ugliest thing I've ever made, but still has nostalgia. :upside:

 

I've seen people suggesting wrapping a bit of electrical tape around the teeth of the clips, so that they still hold snugly, but without leaving "bite" marks. :)

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

Edited by OneBoot

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That is a good idea! I wish I still had my first miniature that I painted, if anything it would be awesome to be able to see the differences. It could be like your own personal museum. :)

 

I never thought of using electrical tape, I did use a bit of paper towel, but electrical tape seems much easier. :)

 

I like that you used a chessex dice case to put your miniatures on. That is also a good idea. I have been using Glass Mccormick seasoning grinders. I think they were about 2-3 dollars at the grocery store and are actually fairly heavy and easy to hold. A lot of my food was heavily seasoned for a while though. :)

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