MamaGeek

St. Patrick (02087: Brother Louis IV)

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Hooooly caaaarp!

 

I mean...wow...just...it's...wow.

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stunning work. knowing what I'm looking at on the floor allows me to appreciate what it was you were going for.

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stunning work. knowing what I'm looking at on the floor allows me to appreciate what it was you were going for.

Still not totally successful, though, right? Ah, well, it's my first attempt. I'll have to do it again sometime, for the practice!

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Like all your work, this is amazing. (Especially the beard, I never would have known it wasn't originally part of the piece.) I think the reason why the stained glass doesn't quite work is because there is no corresponding beam of light or other lighting effect to give the related visual cues. If you had a wall or something you could add those elements in, but it's cursedly hard to paint air. :upside:

 

Still a strikingly lifelike miniature.

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stunning work. knowing what I'm looking at on the floor allows me to appreciate what it was you were going for.

Still not totally successful, though, right? Ah, well, it's my first attempt. I'll have to do it again sometime, for the practice!

 

No no! You pulled it off! Next time I would extend the effect onto his robes, that would give you enough space to include an actual image of something (maybe an angel?) I think that would have made it obvious enough to stand out on it's own.

 

As for the pattern for the angel: google a pic you like, import into photoshop, and use the stainglass filter. Bam. Instant reference pattern.

 

EDIT: PM me a link to a pic you like and I can hook you up with the altered image later tonight

 

EDIT 2.0: Having taken a closer look at the floor you really did an amazing job on the marble texture!!

Edited by Girot
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Next time I would extend the effect onto his robes, that would give you enough space to include an actual image of something (maybe an angel?) I think that would have made it obvious enough to stand out on it's own.

 

As for the pattern for the angel: google a pic you like, import into photoshop, and use the stainglass filter. Bam. Instant reference pattern.

 

 

Thanks for the idea! I'll squirrel it away on one of the scraps of paper I keep in my painting box. (I really need a notebook or something...nah!) And thanks for the offer to PS it for me. I know how to do that, though. I just didn't think to try it for this figure.

 

Thanks, everyone, for all the kind words!

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The lighting effect is ambitious and really a lovely idea. The subtle freehands on the cloak are fantastic. Great, rich green color. Just...deep, and the texture...fabulous technique.

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The Chasuble is impressive. The freehand shamrocks, and its shading is very well done. I would not have guessed that the beard was not part of the original. I looked that the splash of color on the floor and thought stained glass. I agree with Jeremy that some of that color on the hem of the robe would help sell it.

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St. Patrick, converted from 02087, Brother Louis IV (basically I added a beard)

 

The floor is supposed to be marble tile, with light through a stained glass window on part of it. Not sure it really works, but I gave it a shot.

 

The freehand on the back is of shamrocks, not four-leaf clovers, in case you were wondering. Shamrocks have three heart-shaped leaves. St. Patrick used them to teach about the Holy Trinity.

 

Wow I LOVE the freehanded shamrocks - just lovely!

heidi

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Huh. I never knew what the significance of a shamrock was. Cool.

 

You did a wonderful job on this mini, MamaGeek. I think the beard adds quite a bit of character to his face.

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That's beautiful!

 

The freehand is outstanding on the robe. The stained glass light does make total sense since you mentioned what it was. I think that no matter how 'accurate' you make something like that, it may be a leap for the mind to 'get it' without seeing the stained glass that is being implied. For instance, in a diorama with a stained glass window, I think your light on the floor would need no explanation. Does that make any sense?

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im a believer ! amazing!!!! i like the stain glass effect i think it worked great freehand great job!!

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incredible!! I haven't seen anything like this before. The artwork of the robe is extremly well done.

 

perfect work

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