galladril

Sculpting Putty Differences

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One of the things Julie mentioned in here "Sculpting Dragons" class, in addition to the Fimo + GS mix that DixonGrfx mentioned, was that milliput might be a bit more toxic than GS or Fimo. Anybody experimenting with it might want to be careful about hand washing or wear gloves. (At least, that's my memory - please correct me if you remember differently!)

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"Might"?

 

Other than a gut feeling, anything actually... factual about such affirmation?

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Here's the SDS for Milliput. Couldn't find an SDS for Kneadatite Blue/Yellow, but this page indicates that the precautions are very similar. Neither looks bad to me, but everyone has a different tolerance for risk, so make your own decision.

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Julie said that the rumor is you shouldn't stick tools or your fingers in your mouth after touching GS, but she said that she has been sculpting with Knedatite as a full time job and liking her tools for 30 years and never noticed any kind of side effects. My wife took Patrick Kieth's class and he told the story of how when he was an understudy, his instructor told him to chew the GS like gum to mix the blue and yellow together. He doesn't do that now. But I think there is a fair amount of practical evidence that GS is non-toxic. I will tell you that you should avoid touching your eyes after handling GS. I've done that and it made my eyes water a burn for a bit. It was uncomfortable.

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Most of the two part putties are epoxy based, especially GS and Procreate, but I think the others are to.  As such, all epoxy is toxic to varying degrees when uncured, but the level of such varies depending on the type of resin and hardener in the mix.  I would not chew or eat while using sculpting putties, personally.  YMMV

Edited by TaleSpinner
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Yeah, exactly. Precautions, knowledge stuff is toxic vs personal experience + rumors always bother me.

 

I mean, the stuff is not for eating, don't get it in your mouth. It might (all putties) also cause issues if they come in direct contact with skin, depending on your sensibilities (mucous contact as in eyes is a big no-no for almost everything, btw). 

 

But I don't get the benefict in spreading a rumour a certain material IS toxic... more than the counterparts, that's it.

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IIRC, Gene also suggested a GS and polymer clay combination in the same ratio.  I am totally blanking on the specific kind he recommended, and I forgot my pen for that class, so I didn't write it down.

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IIRC, Gene also suggested a GS and polymer clay combination in the same ratio.  I am totally blanking on the specific kind he recommended, and I forgot my pen for that class, so I didn't write it down.

 

Gene uses FIMO Classic.  He's the one that originally turned me on to this mix.

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That's it.  I knew it was Classic, just couldn't remember if it was Sculpey of Fimo.

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Julie said that the rumor is you shouldn't stick tools or your fingers in your mouth after touching GS, but she said that she has been sculpting with Knedatite as a full time job and liking her tools for 30 years and never noticed any kind of side effects. My wife took Patrick Kieth's class and he told the story of how when he was an understudy, his instructor told him to chew the GS like gum to mix the blue and yellow together. He doesn't do that now. But I think there is a fair amount of practical evidence that GS is non-toxic. I will tell you that you should avoid touching your eyes after handling GS. I've done that and it made my eyes water a burn for a bit. It was uncomfortable.

 

All I remember is an anecdote from that class, so I don't want to take any kind of stand or spread rumors. (and yes, I also remember her talking about 30 years of tool-licking without issue using GS.)

 

I wasn't trying to put down milliput as a product or start a panic.

Edited by klarg1
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would original sculpey and GS work? I have a bunch of it, and a bunch of fimo as well, but I am always looking for new and better ways of doing bases and such.

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would original sculpey and GS work? I have a bunch of it, and a bunch of fimo as well, but I am always looking for new and better ways of doing bases and such.

 

No idea, but since it is a polymer clay with a similar make-up to FIMO, it should behave similarly, but I'd try it in a small test first.

 

 

GS/Apoxie Sculpt Test Results:

 

I did some very fine detail work with this mix over the weekend.  It holds details great.  It is quite different to work with than GS alone though and took some getting used to.  It has much less memory than GS (i.e., less of the bubblegum effect) and seems to be much softer.  If any of you have ever taken one of Gene's classes you've probably heard him tell you that when sculpting details you need to touch the putty with the force of a butterfly's farts.  Well, butterfly farts would blow right through this stuff, we're talking amoeba farts here.  That took some getting used to.  There was no tactile feed back at all, purely visual.  It was like sculpting air.  That said, when done, it stayed where I put it and didn't relax like GS alone tends to do.  I don't think it would be good for doing faces or anything where you want the GS deformation to work for you, but it sure made a nice set of scaly feet with sharp pointy claws for me.

 

I should also add that I used it to make one of the best underpin animal skulls I've ever made.  This stuff if perfect for underpinning.

Edited by TaleSpinner
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New Update on GS/Apoxie Sculpt Mix:

 

It is rather brittle.  When I went to separate the feet I sculpted from the cork on the base, the feet cracked and broke.  I now have to resculpt most of them. :down:

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 when he was an understudy, his instructor told him to chew the GS like gum to mix the blue and yellow together.

 

Oh god just the thought... my fillings!!

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