galladril

Sculpting Putty Differences

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I probably should've just posted the pictures and saved a headache :P

NOTE: These are not mine, they are examples of the material I'm trying to identify (the white stuff)

tumblr_inline_o7lw5b0jtR1suxz4f_1280.jpg

 

 

 

Huh.. after looking at another picture of the Fractured Dimension one.. that might be .. something else.. I thought they were the same material but maybe not.

SAM_2982.JPG

Edited by 4tonmantis
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 That might be the Sculpey Translucent... I bought some once to experiment with, and it came out about the same color, which wasn't nearly as translucent as I was hoping for...

Edited by Mad Jack

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The only two part epoxy I could find locally was Tamiya.

 

From my first experience, I don't like it as sculpting material. From the instructions themselves, it takes 5-6 hours to cure, 12 hours for full hardening. The texture feels like chewing gum. Soft sticky chewing gum when freshly kneaded, then getting firmer and firmer as it cured. But even when fully cured, it's still keeps a good amount of flex (at least on the 3/32" size left over mini rod I had).

 

It's probably a much better gap filler than sculpting material.

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The only two part epoxy I could find locally was Tamiya.

 

From my first experience, I don't like it as sculpting material. From the instructions themselves, it takes 5-6 hours to cure, 12 hours for full hardening. The texture feels like chewing gum. Soft sticky chewing gum when freshly kneaded, then getting firmer and firmer as it cured. But even when fully cured, it's still keeps a good amount of flex (at least on the 3/32" size left over mini rod I had).

 

It's probably a much better gap filler than sculpting material.

I have a old package of green stuff that is exactley like that.

I found it bad for sculpting and making bases with Basius pads.

It was like trying to use chewing gum that had been chewed for several hours first.

I only use it for green stuffing magnets in place where super glue would not give enough support to keep the magnet in position until it sets.

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 Greenstuff gets stale after a few years...

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My old green stuff is so hard that it cracked plastic bases in half when I tried making bases on Basius pad with it.

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 There is one good use for old, rock-hard greenstuff, though - you can use it as filler to bulk out basic shapes of objects, or to glue inside the bottom of a base to add weight...

Edited by Mad Jack

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The only two part epoxy I could find locally was Tamiya.

 

From my first experience, I don't like it as sculpting material. From the instructions themselves, it takes 5-6 hours to cure, 12 hours for full hardening. The texture feels like chewing gum. Soft sticky chewing gum when freshly kneaded, then getting firmer and firmer as it cured. But even when fully cured, it's still keeps a good amount of flex (at least on the 3/32" size left over mini rod I had).

 

It's probably a much better gap filler than sculpting material.

 

Which Tamiya Putty did you find?  The Quick Type (brown) or the Smooth Type (light blue).  I've used both over time, though mostly on larger resin and styrene figures.  I did use the smooth type more for gap filling and broad details, letting it harden completely and then carving and sanding it to shape -- it had about the same texture and rigidity as the plastic.  I've tried the quick type and found the same flex and consistency that you did -- and that the age of it matters, too.  I just tried sculpting with it last week and found that where it took overnight to harden when new, it now takes about four days.

 

And that's nothing compared to the trouble of using Tamiya's Polyester Putty...  man, that stuff smells...

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The only two part epoxy I could find locally was Tamiya.

 

From my first experience, I don't like it as sculpting material. From the instructions themselves, it takes 5-6 hours to cure, 12 hours for full hardening. The texture feels like chewing gum. Soft sticky chewing gum when freshly kneaded, then getting firmer and firmer as it cured. But even when fully cured, it's still keeps a good amount of flex (at least on the 3/32" size left over mini rod I had).

 

It's probably a much better gap filler than sculpting material.

 

Which Tamiya Putty did you find?  The Quick Type (brown) or the Smooth Type (light blue).  I've used both over time, though mostly on larger resin and styrene figures.  I did use the smooth type more for gap filling and broad details, letting it harden completely and then carving and sanding it to shape -- it had about the same texture and rigidity as the plastic.  I've tried the quick type and found the same flex and consistency that you did -- and that the age of it matters, too.  I just tried sculpting with it last week and found that where it took overnight to harden when new, it now takes about four days.

 

And that's nothing compared to the trouble of using Tamiya's Polyester Putty...  man, that stuff smells...

 

I don't have it nearby, but I think it was more light sky blue, or mint Oreo filling green like MSP maggot white.

 

Don't know how old the package was when I got it.

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I don't have it nearby, but I think it was more light sky blue, or mint Oreo filling green like MSP maggot white.

 

Don't know how old the package was when I got it.

 

It sounds like the smooth type, then.  Your description of its properties is about right for a moderately fresh package.  You'll find that it takes relatively forever to fully cure, depending on how much you knead it and the temperature.  Though, one time I came back after a few months to finish carving some details on a resin figure, and the putty had turned rock-hard, so there's hope for your sculpt yet.

 

I've used the Tamiya Smooth putty on Reaper Bones before -- I used it to gap-fill Cthulhu's tail onto his body.  With CA bonding and Tamiya gap-filling, the joint was seamless.

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It sounds like the smooth type, then.  Your description of its properties is about right for a moderately fresh package.  You'll find that it takes relatively forever to fully cure, depending on how much you knead it and the temperature.  Though, one time I came back after a few months to finish carving some details on a resin figure, and the putty had turned rock-hard, so there's hope for your sculpt yet.

 

I've used the Tamiya Smooth putty on Reaper Bones before -- I used it to gap-fill Cthulhu's tail onto his body.  With CA bonding and Tamiya gap-filling, the joint was seamless.

Considering that my sculpt is on its way to Reaper (see Sir For$ale for the sword and moneybags), I will not be working on this mini anymore.

 

But I *do* have a spare Cthulhu (and Kaladrax, Nethyrmaul) which will need gap filling.

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And if anyone has the comparison, what is the differences between magic sculpt and apoxie?  the two materials look very similar and I was curious if one was better than the other.

 

Thanks

 

I know some sculptors who can notice differences, and some of those prefer magic sculp. (claiming a finer grain, IIRC) But in my experience: not much.

 

 

I did some research and found that the white part of Apoxie contains compounds that will react with silicon.  You need to spray with a layer of mold release or some other compound that will create a barrier between your master and the silicon.  I did a light coat of acrylic primer as a test and it seems to work fine.

 

Lesson learned!

 

Yikes. Good to know.

 

 

I can't figure out how to split the quotes, darnit! 

 

Anyway, I've been almost exclusively using Magic Sculpt, though I have acquired a sample of what I presume to be red Apoxie Sculpt.

 

Magic sculpt starts off fairly stiff with a small amount of memory. Generally it will stay what ever shape you push it into, though it might sag a bit in the first minutes after mixing. It will retain details as fine as fingerprints. In a few hours it becomes leather-hard but still toolable with a knife, and after a day is fully hardened, but can be drilled, sanded, or filed. At this point it has almost no grain and an almost waxy surface, compared to the red Apoxie which hardens to a very slightly gritty surface and is much more resistant to tooling. 

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Well.... got some Castilene. My initial thoughts:

 

Castilene Hard:

 

- Hard wax used in the action figure industry, or so I've heard.

- Melts at 170F, softens before then.

- Liquid wax can be cast with.

- A little cheaper than Super Sculpey by volume, but comes in hard to find 2.5 lb. ingots.

-Comes in three hardnesses, can be mixed.

 

Pros:

- Light and strong, self supporting, no need for an armature. Thin parts doable.

- Parts can be cut off, worked on, and then welded back on.

- Can be worked by hands warm, can be worked by tools cold. This means no more accidental finger smooshing of fine detail.

- Excellent for both additive and subtractive sculpture.

- Can be smoothed with heat, sandpaper, burnishing tools, and/or chemical solvents.

 

Cons:

- Start up cost. A mini crockpot and some metal tools are near mandatory to start with, an alcohol lamp, heat gun, sanding pads, and/or electric wax carver may be wanted down the road. That last is especially expensive.

- Safety risks: Not only is liquid wax hot, there can be a lot of flammable liquids in close proximity to heated surfaces and open flame. Glass alcohol lamps are basically molotov cocktails. Lighter fluid for smoothing is, well, lighter fluid. D-limonene for smoothing is rocket fuel.

- Wax shrinks from warm to cooled state.

- Cannot work in super thick volumes due to shrinkage cracking the surface. Building up in layers recommended.

- Area will smell of wax. The chemical smelling kind, not the scented candle kind.

- Wax sold literally as hardened 2.5lb bricks. Must be melted down and recast into smaller ingots before really usable.

 

All in all, an excellent material for sculpting busts and large scale figures (1/6 - 1/12), but probably not that great for 30mm minis. I actually like this a lot better than Super Sculpey Firm for busts though.

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I've just started to learn to use BrownStuff/Greenstuff mix for armatures, and wow it is SO much better for fine-proportion miniatures, so much easier to work with than Greenstuff alone. I've used Brownstuff before but I failed to appreciate what was special about it, but now I get it; Brownstuff is much denser than Greenstuff - Greenstuff is quite "spongy" by comparison - so it spreads more thinly than Greenstuff while retaining it's shape. There's no advantage I can see to using Brownstuff on a bulkier sculpt, but where I need to avoid adding bulk I am now using a 70% GS - 30% BS mix.

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