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Jack Brown

Glazes and washes and wet palettes

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Bringing this topic up again but simply to put out there how awesome a wet palette is. I made mine tonight and the painting experience was so much better. Not a drop of my precious paint was wasted do to getting tacky or drying out and my speed increased immensely. If you are a new painter and are thinking that you don't need a wet palette to do your thing you are definitely right but you are depriving yourself of a really awesome tool. Search Youtube and make your own they are super easy and super cheap.

 

 

The three most important things I learned about tools to paint minis: buy the best brushes, thin your paints and use a wet palette.

 

I've mentioned it elsewhere, but to reiterate: I just use a ceramic dinner plate with a high lipped edge. Two thick, quilted paper towels (I use Bounty brand) and parchment paper (Reynolds brand) trimmed to be about a half inch smaller than the paper towels. Place in the plate, soak until the parchment no longer curls, drain off the excess water leaving the paper towel saturated. I put plastic wrap over the plate between sessions.

 

 

Well this seals it for me... I have been contemplating doing this. It's time.

 

Also, thanks Doug, I will try the Reynolds as well, thank you for the recommendation.

Edited by Arc 724
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Well this seals it for me... I have been contemplating doing this. It's time.

 

Also, thanks Doug, I will try the Reynolds as well, thank you for the recommendation.

Ditto here.

 

I never quite understood the advantages of doing wet palette vs the hassle of using and preparing them. But reading on how ridiculously simple it is to make and use, I will try it.

Edited by Cranky Dog
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I use my wet pallet for regular paints and washes/glazes. Just make sure I give it enough room so that I can add the necessary water and not run into other paints nearby. 

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I had issues with Reynolds Parchment. In the Texas climate, it wasn't letting enough moisture through and my paints kept drying out. Out of frustration I tried Reynolds wax paper and it worked much better, keeping my paints hydrated better. But the paper begins to deteriorate the more you work with the paint on top of it. Not acceptable as then your brush starts to pick up paper fibers along with the paint.  Now I'm going back to parchment and trying again.

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I had issues with Reynolds Parchment. In the Texas climate, it wasn't letting enough moisture through and my paints kept drying out. Out of frustration I tried Reynolds wax paper and it worked much better, keeping my paints hydrated better. But the paper begins to deteriorate the more you work with the paint on top of it. Not acceptable as then your brush starts to pick up paper fibers along with the paint.  Now I'm going back to parchment and trying again.

 

Depending where you are in TX, it might be dryer or wetter here, but I haven't had the problem you report with parchment. That said, I come very close to floating the parchment when I'm working with the palette. (I do drain most of the water not captured by the sponge before moving the palette.)

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I had issues with Reynolds Parchment. In the Texas climate, it wasn't letting enough moisture through and my paints kept drying out. Out of frustration I tried Reynolds wax paper and it worked much better, keeping my paints hydrated better. But the paper begins to deteriorate the more you work with the paint on top of it. Not acceptable as then your brush starts to pick up paper fibers along with the paint.  Now I'm going back to parchment and trying again.

 

Hmm, that's funny you say that with the Texas climate as I live in the middle of the desert (Las Vegas). I use Reynolds and it works just fine. I tried the wax paper and hated it, hated it so much.

 

Perhaps you aren't soaking your parchment paper long enough? A lot of people will actually boil the paper for a few minutes and all the fibers to break down a little bit which will allow for more water to be able to come through to the top. 

 

I usually let mine sit in very hot water for 10-15 minutes until it stops curling up, this is done in the wet palette I have. I place the parchment paper down, then put the sponge over it, then fill it with very hot water (probably around 130 degrees), let sit and come back to it a little later. It works like a charm.

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I had issues with Reynolds Parchment. In the Texas climate, it wasn't letting enough moisture through and my paints kept drying out. Out of frustration I tried Reynolds wax paper and it worked much better, keeping my paints hydrated better. But the paper begins to deteriorate the more you work with the paint on top of it. Not acceptable as then your brush starts to pick up paper fibers along with the paint.  Now I'm going back to parchment and trying again.

 

Hmm, that's funny you say that with the Texas climate as I live in the middle of the desert (Las Vegas). I use Reynolds and it works just fine. I tried the wax paper and hated it, hated it so much.

 

Perhaps you aren't soaking your parchment paper long enough? A lot of people will actually boil the paper for a few minutes and all the fibers to break down a little bit which will allow for more water to be able to come through to the top. 

 

I usually let mine sit in very hot water for 10-15 minutes until it stops curling up, this is done in the wet palette I have. I place the parchment paper down, then put the sponge over it, then fill it with very hot water (probably around 130 degrees), let sit and come back to it a little later. It works like a charm.

 

 

 

I'll have to try that.

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I usually let mine sit in very hot water for 10-15 minutes until it stops curling up, this is done in the wet palette I have. I place the parchment paper down, then put the sponge over it, then fill it with very hot water (probably around 130 degrees), let sit and come back to it a little later. It works like a charm.

 

 

Now that you say that, putting the sponge on top of the parchment to start with seems obvious.

 

Doh!

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I usually let mine sit in very hot water for 10-15 minutes until it stops curling up, this is done in the wet palette I have. I place the parchment paper down, then put the sponge over it, then fill it with very hot water (probably around 130 degrees), let sit and come back to it a little later. It works like a charm.

Doesn't need to be hot water. I just use cold tap water, which comes out of the tap at "OH MAH LORD IT'S COLD" this time of year.
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I usually let mine sit in very hot water for 10-15 minutes until it stops curling up, this is done in the wet palette I have. I place the parchment paper down, then put the sponge over it, then fill it with very hot water (probably around 130 degrees), let sit and come back to it a little later. It works like a charm.

 

 

Now that you say that, putting the sponge on top of the parchment to start with seems obvious.

 

Doh!

 

 

Haha! Doesn't curl, it came to me one day when I was trying to get it to lay flat and I was the same way. DUH! Doh!

 

 

I usually let mine sit in very hot water for 10-15 minutes until it stops curling up, this is done in the wet palette I have. I place the parchment paper down, then put the sponge over it, then fill it with very hot water (probably around 130 degrees), let sit and come back to it a little later. It works like a charm.

Doesn't need to be hot water. I just use cold tap water, which comes out of the tap at "OH MAH LORD IT'S COLD" this time of year.

 

 

I like the hot water, it just seems to work better/faster for me. 

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Must be the lack of humidity in that gods-forsaken land. Usually a couple minutes in cold tap water works here in the land blessed by the proper deities.

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Must be the lack of humidity in that gods-forsaken land. Usually a couple minutes in cold tap water works here in the land blessed by the proper deities.

 

That can certainly be the case, just like with wood here, it needs time to acclimate. For example, people who have hardwood floors need to put them in their homes in the boxes for like a month before actually installing. This is so that the wood acclimates with the lower humidity and doesn't change after it's been installed causing warping or gaps. I'd think that paper is the same way.

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I forgot / didn't hava time to pick up that Reynolds magic paper you have on the States on my trip, but I have to say that it is much different to any kind of wax/non-wax/cotton/parchment paper I have ever tried in Argentina. 

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I forgot / didn't hava time to pick up that Reynolds magic paper you have on the States on my trip, but I have to say that it is much different to any kind of wax/non-wax/cotton/parchment paper I have ever tried in Argentina. 

 

Dang, I should've just sent you home with some of it. The next time you are in the states, I can easily mail you a box, it's not very expensive here.

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