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Giant sizes, how have they changed?

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Wouldn't it be cool if there were giant casualty figures!? Dead and lying on the ground with great wounds!?

 

This would be one of the most popular figures ever ... for about 100 people.

 

Decisions about what to make, when made by companies who are likely to stay around, need to be expensive and low-risk, inexpensive and low-risk, or inexpensive and high-risk. Expensive and high-risk, even when the payoff might be commensurate, is the business equivalent of a Hail Mary pass -- when it works it can save a lost game, but you don't do it unless you have to.

 

Which is to say, "What Bryan said".

 

ps. Casualty figures are beloved of diorama builders, who are apparently a very vocal part of the audience, but have historically been poor sellers.

Yes. Our existing casualty markers are very popular with a very small segment of our market, but have the advantage of being low-cost/low-risk.

 

This actually makes me wonder if Bones casualty markers might do better, given that Bones Giants do much better than their metal counterparts...

 

I suspect in-game demand for casualty markers to be quite low, as in decades of gaming I have never thought to need even one, but personal experience is but anecdotal, and "anecdote" is not the plural of "data".

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I think casualty markers are one of those things that sound neat but are not much called for.

 

My memory is unclear, but I seem to recall someone giving a young relation a GW giant kit which may have included a vacuum-formed clear plastic giant casualty figure, possibly paintable but certainly not as solidly made as the figure itself.

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Darn, does that mean I'm never going to see that female stone giant I've always wanted?

 

Curses....

Time to talk to some concept artists, sculptors and manufacturers and start your own kickstarter!

 

A single female stone giant would make for a modest funding goal, and you could add other giant or giant-kin as stretch goals.

 

I know I'd love to see some other female giants, as none of the traditional ones well represented with females. I don't think I've ever seen a female version of a firbolg or a fomorian. Also, ettins, trolls, ogres, cyclops, titans, bugbears, minotaurs, you would have no shortage of stretch goals if the project took off.

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I think casualty markers are one of those things that sound neat but are not much called for.

 

My memory is unclear, but I seem to recall someone giving a young relation a GW giant kit which may have included a vacuum-formed clear plastic giant casualty figure, possibly paintable but certainly not as solidly made as the figure itself.

That vacu- formed marker was to designate how many models were hit by the falling giant, and would therefore have to make saves to avoid being crushed and killed.

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To be honest, my intent in starting this thread was to explore how the concept and scale of giants as monsters had changed over the years in roleplaying games, not to request particular types of giant or lament their lack. I got interested because of a chance remark made in another thread about how giants were treated in 5E D&D.

 

I'm sure ReaperBryan is correct about the economics of giant models, which even in lightweight less expensive plastic need to sell well enough to be worth the making. And like it or not, the official publications of this hobby skew mightily towards the male in monsters and characters. While Reaper is far above average in its treatment of female gamers and characters, I would not like to see it lose money chasing after something too niche with too limited an audience.

 

Papo and Schleich and other toymakers make plenty of somewhat larger warrior types, male and some female, which can stand in just fine for giants if need be.

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Darn, does that mean I'm never going to see that female stone giant I've always wanted?

 

Curses....

Stone giants had grey to blue grey hair in 1E (thought they did go bald in 2E to keep with the 1e AD&D MM Iconic illo), so just painting Yephima grey would be within canon. 

 

If Reaper ever did make a bald female giant, I kinda suspect she'd still be overly 'filled out' for a stone giant, like an Amber Rose rather than the strong and lithe look the race tends to have.

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It follows then that the Male Giants of each variety make business sense as First Forays into Giant types.

 

It follows that when sales are strong, Female giants of the same subtype are introduces, and for giant varieties whose highest-knowable demand version are unpopular, female versions of the same are potentially too high-risk for safe investment in sculpting, models, and materials.

 

So did the enormous giants Blorg, Frorigh and Gunther do poorer than expected? Because not only was the closest female to them the much smaller Frulla Krung, it seemed reaper went with much smaller giants overall until the Bones Cloud and Storm giants. 

 

Also has the sales boost from being an attractive female model for the female giants help mitigate than the statistical demand for numbers of male giants?

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I imagine the price of pewter had a lot to do with the overall mass of giant figures. Volume increases a great deal with just a small increase of height, leading to potentially very expensive figures.

 

People have enough uses for dragons to splurge on them when they are massive. Giants, maybe not so much.

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Some of the Privateer Press (Legion of Everblight) Heavy Warbeasts in metal were hollow-bodied, multi-piece kits. I don't know if that would help drop the price, but I really like metal minis over Bonesium.

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To be honest, my intent in starting this thread was to explore how the concept and scale of giants as monsters had changed over the years in roleplaying games, not to request particular types of giant or lament their lack. I got interested because of a chance remark made in another thread about how giants were treated in 5E D&D.

 

Well chances are if they were using HO scale minis in the infancy of the D&D game, the giants were probably represented by 2.5" plastic toy cavemen, vikings and knights, likely from the old Louis Marx playsets. After all this was the same era that turned those small plastic kaiju monsters imported as "dinosaurs" into Rust monsters, Bulletes and owlbears.

 

Now with these 32+mm minis all over the place, the giants are hovering around 4" to 5". If this scale creep isn't stopped soon, folks will need to break out the 6" Louis Marx cavemen, vikings and knights to remind these so called Heroic scale characters who REALLY is larger than life!

Edited by scorpio616
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So anybody know of any unattractive female giants? I'm pressing into service some copies of the Betty Page bodied Giganta from Heroclix, but if there are any figs that look like this Paizo female hill giant in the 3" to 6" tall range, it would be nice to know about them.

Coming this year is a Paizo female frost giant. I'm not sure how many giants will come out in their newest release thou as they've only shown a few releases so far.

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