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Just got back from it a little while ago. Really liked it. The shrinking/regrowing while fighting made the action a little hard to make out at times. While not Marvels best outing by far, it was still a thoroughly enjoyable movie. (And let's be honest, that bar is set pretty dang high at this point.)

What did everybody else think?

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I liked it. It continued the Marvel tradition they've got going of reinventing the genre or at least trying a new subgenre each time. They don't just make superhero movies, they make heist movies, spy movies, crime movies, etc., that just happen to have superheroes in them.

 

Not Really Spoilers, but Spoiler-ish-ish:

I also like that they went almost full comedy with this one. More conventional than Guardians, but just as comical.

 

This one is more family friendly, which is fine. Again, something different.

 

Best thing for me was how involved in their whole universe this has gone. At this point, they should feel free to discuss events in their extended universe, and they go right ahead and do it.

 

As mentioned, not their best. But Marvel's "lesser" flicks still seem more enjoyable than a lot of other studios' "better" flicks.

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Of course!! 

Howard the Duck and Cap??

I swear the entire theater was shocked into silence...

Edited by David Brawley
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Of course!!

Howard the Duck and Cap??

I swear the entire theater was shocked into silence...

Dude, spoilers tags!

Edited by Cranky Dog

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Of course!!

Howard the Duck and Cap??

I swear the entire theater was shocked into silence...

Dude, spoilers tags!

 

Opps, sorry...

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I want to see it this evening, but looking at advance bookings for my local cinema, the room is empty. Zero bookings. It's too depressing to be the only person in a movie theatre.

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 I personally love being the only or one of the only people in the theater... I get to enjoy the movie without distractions and can really get into it.

 

The only problem with a mostly empty theater is the lack of people to absorb the head-exploding volume of the sound on most movies these days... :rolleyes:

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I saw Kull the Conquerer in an empty theater, on it's opening night and it was awesome! (not the move, that was god awful and was out of theaters the very next day) I love seeing movies like that. Normally you have to go late at night to a movie that's been out for a while for that though.

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Just got back from this.  Nothing but PURE FUN!  I didn't want dark and epic.  That's what DC is for.

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Of course!! 

Howard the Duck and Cap??

I swear the entire theater was shocked into silence...

Yeah this is definitely not what I saw...

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Of course!! 

Howard the Duck and Cap??

I swear the entire theater was shocked into silence...

Yeah this is definitely not what I saw...

 

Should have stayed to the end-end... you know, after the ushers have swept the floor...

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Of course!! 

Howard the Duck and Cap??

I swear the entire theater was shocked into silence...

Yeah this is definitely not what I saw...

 

Should have stayed to the end-end... you know, after the ushers have swept the floor...

 

Just came back from it. Much preferred it to Avenger 2. Very good pacing. A good balance of action, story telling and humour without going over the top in any of them. Still amazing how almost no one in the theater stays until the very VERY end of the credits for the post-credit scene.

 

But like Girot, that is *not* what I saw.

 

 

I saw Bucky/Winter Soldier looking beat up in a warehouse, with Cap and Falcon (both in civilian) looking over him, wondering what to do next. And Falcon saying "I know a guy." And then a "Ant Man will return" text.

 

Now I don't know if you're pulling our leg David, or if there's more than one post-credit scene that different theaters show (not the first time to happen).

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