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Chris Palmer

Chris's Frostgrave & Ghost Archipelago Terrain Efforts

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I thought I would start my own Frostgrave terrain thread, since I started on my second ruin this week, and don't see my self stopping anytime soon. ::P: And, I didn't want to keep posting links in David's excellent Frostgrave terrain thread found here,
http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/65272-frostgrave-terrain/ , and detract from his efforts.


For those that missed it, I already posted my first ruin here in the Frostgrave thread in the Fantasy sub-forum:
http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/63635-frostgrave/?p=1252554

This week, I thought I'd take things to another level :rolleyes: and try my hand at a two-story ruin...
Two improvements I wanted to try this week were to add more debris on to the base; and to mount the building on a squared base to help it feel more like an urban building.

The main structure is made from cork tiles, and the extra details are made with balsa and bass wood.

22540100012_6df7603d2b_k.jpgIMG_5605 by cnjpalmer

22564866181_d1801c8ecc_k.jpgIMG_5606 by cnjpalmer

Edited by Chris Palmer
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That's a great start--looks sturdy too.  I recognize all of those materials, but I've never tried cork walls.  Might be worth a shot.

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That's a great start--looks sturdy too. I recognize all of those materials, but I've never tried cork walls. Might be worth a shot.

That's really cool, I wouldn't have thought of cork before.

 

 

Using cork for gaming terrain isn't my original idea, but I sure am a fan of it. (For a real master at it, search "Matakishi's Tea House", and click the "Making Things" link on the top menu, and then the "Making Buildings" link.)

I like this courser kind for stone, and the finer grained tiles for thinks like concrete or cinderblock.

Edited by Chris Palmer
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I love Matakishi's Tea House futuristic buildings... and I'd forgotten he(?) used cork for the off world colony...

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Yes, it's amazing what he achieves in cork.

 

I put together some quick statues with one of the last Halloween figure packs left at my local Dollar Store, and some left over plaster building parts.

 

22561318602_76dea2a6d3_k.jpgIMG_5611 by cnjpalmer, on Flickr

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Finished up the 2-story cork ruin this morning. I think it turned out pretty good. 

 

 I'm currently considering what to build next.  I'm considering doing a wizards tower, and attempting bend a sheet of cork into a round shape using an oatmeal canister as a base. (anyone have thoughts on bending cork?)  My other thought is some sort of twin square towers that have some sort of precarious bridge between them.  I also have in the back of my mind doing some sort of frozen dock for a Frostgrave waterfront...  I recently got one of the Reaper Dark Maiden figures, and will be getting the "Titans of the Tide" figures with the Bones III Kickstarter, and I've just started have vague ideas of some sort of ruined dockside with half sunk ships and an iced over harbor...

 

IMG_5629.JPG

 

IMG_5630.JPG

 

Shown with my previous attempt:

 

IMG_5633.JPG

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For bending cork... It might be easier to do with a couple thinner layers rather than the thick stuff... ::): Then you could have the seams of the layers offset, which should make it a lot stronger.

 

The new building looks great!

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For bending cork... It might be easier to do with a couple thinner layers rather than the thick stuff... ::): Then you could have the seams of the layers offset, which should make it a lot stronger.

 

The new building looks great!

Thanks!

 

Yes, thinner is a good option; but for stylistic similarity I'd really like to use this same kind of tile. Most of the thinner cork I've seen is the finer grained type. I'll definitely go thinner if I can't make this work.

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